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  1. #421

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by perfaddict View Post
    Perhaps people's reasons for wearing feminine frags could be erroneously misinterpreted as excuses.

    Everybody has a unique reason for doing whatever they do. I wear some feminine frags because they smell great, are very well made, and do not make me feel like i am wearing a leotard and lipstick. Some fem frags are more butch than some masulines i have (Magie Noire by Lancome) yet some are just so creamy that i would feel cheated not being able to wear them for some reason or the other (Encre Noir pour Elle). Yet i am a card-carrying powerhouse frag lover.

    The feminine frags i like will be different from the ones another guy likes, simply because our tastes differ, not necessarily our perception of what is feminine and why we wear them.

    This is a very thought-provoking thread and thanks, jlouismi, for sharing.
    My pleasure, and thanks for your opinion, you make some very valid points

  2. #422
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Great discussion. I tend to wear a wide range of masculines, plus unisex and some of the more unisex feminines. I'm not a real fan of the most currently popular "feminine" notes and genres, like candy floss florals and lily of the valley. I do like powder, vanilla, and chypre, so that sends me over the line on a fair number of scents.

    I own designated feminines for only one reason - I like the smell. My wife owns others that I like, but that I would never wear, because they're not me. Others that she owns, I will sometimes poach for a wear, but by and large, if I really like a feminine, I'll buy it for myself or for both of us to share.

    My favorite feminine is Chanel no.5 Eau Première - I just love it. I tend to like powdery fragrances of all kinds.

    In the last couple of years, I've seen a lot of movement by perfumers back and forth across the rather blurry "gender line", and I think it's a good thing.
    * * * *

  3. #423

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    I absolutely agree with the topic starter and I have posted the same in another topic where things got a little out of hand.

  4. #424

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    One of the sweetest love stories we watched play out before us as children involved ladies perfume. An elderly couple who were always together, who could finish each other's sentences, who never were rivals, and who were ''in love'' almost like teenagers always wore fragrances. Elmer *always* had on rose scents. Finally somebody asked him why, as that kind of thing was ''odd'' especially in the 1960's and 70's in the northern Great Plains of the US. Elmer's eyes popped wide open and in the quietest, most confident, and manly sort of way, he gently said ''I always want to be reminded of my wife, and I can have her memory right here on my skin.''

    That's solid rocks jock stuff isn't it. When Elmer's friends reminisce, his perfumes often come up in the middle of many fond fond memories.

    It influenced my fragrance wardrobe from the very beginning. As of yet, I have never purchased a fragrance for myself that I would not be proud to have Mrs. J. wear herself and a number of hers I would use unhesitatingly, even if for a private and kind moment of heart.

    Mine: Shalimar, Chanel No.5, Kenzo Indian Holi, Kenzo Amour. Looking to add Amouage Lyric and Chanel No.19 EdP.

  5. #425
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    I disagree. I wear fragrances for the notes that i enjoy, not because they suggest feminine or masculine sides. I enjoy spices, vanilla, some flowers, aldehydes, cream musks, woods, citrus. I just don't feel that it's right to limit my olfactory experiences trying to put them in sex terms. It's what the industry try to sell and it's what most people will buy, but to me fragrance is above all the things art, and art cannot be restrained to this approach. Fragrance is one of the areas of my life that i feel most free. I just wear what makes me feel happy, I'm not searching for men, or woman fragrances, i just search for fragrances. My taste for fragrances went to this direction and to me it's pointless to waist my time not wearing some that i like just because it's marketed for another sex besides mine.
    I agree 100% with everything you said.
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  6. #426

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    ok, but what's your take on the subject then? Do you believe that those persisting gender cliches (boys prefer blue to pink, play with toy guns and cars rather than Barbies etc) are just a product of our education/society?
    There is alot of grey area in life and socialization. And it's not just about blue versus pink or barbies versus toy guns. Nor are we "...just a product of our education/society?". But education and society has a ton of effect and influence.

    Back on topic, anyone who has done enough sampling knows that there are many fragrances that are marked as feminine, that can EASILY be used by men ( without hesitation). And vice versa.

    Quote Originally Posted by Suppressor View Post
    I absolutely agree with the topic starter and I have posted the same in another topic where things got a little out of hand.
    Maybe you did something wrong.
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Nicole Miller (vintage), Opium pour Homme, Oxford & Cambridge...etc.

    Seeking decant/sample of Jil Sander Feeling Man, Cacharel Nemo, Bijan for Men EDC, Lanvin for Men, Giorgio VIP, Il Lancetti and other old school frags ....etc. I have samples to swap.

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  7. #427

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    If I'm in a department store, e.g., I'm always going to start at the men's counter for the simple fact that it's easier. Scents marketed to men tend to have the blends of notes I prefer more often than women's scents do, so it's just easier for me to start there. However, if I'm at a place like Barneys New York, where everything is mixed up, I don't give a damn if the SA sprays a women's, unisex or men's frag on a smelling strip for me. I just tell the SA what note combos I usually like, and go from there, and if I like it and can afford it, I'll get it.

    Hell, I'll take a bottle of L'Arte di Gucci for Women any day over a bottle of Kenneth Cole Black For Men.

  8. #428

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfacing View Post
    There is alot of grey area in life and socialization. And it's not just about blue versus pink or barbies versus toy guns. Nor are we "...just a product of our education/society?". But education and society has a ton of effect and influence.
    That's my point though:
    Males and females get birthed with several differences in all kinds of areas and I believe that this extends to a degree on what they like and what they dislike. There's an ongoing debate under scientists about how much the environment (e.g. education, marketing etc.) and how much is inherited (recurring cliches). We can be sure that both are factors so that leads me to think that:

    For practical reasons evolution lead to different preference-patterns for males and females -> that lead to some kind of hardcoding in our genes and is inherited by birth -> that leads to some preconceptions (and cliches) of what we perceive as masculine or feminine.
    However...
    Humans are also able to redefine themselve to some extend ("ability to adapt") as reaction to their environment. Going against their hardwired preconceptions is possible (but might be perceived by others or themselves as irritating/unusual/strange/etc) and could be called "pushing their boundaries" (as someone in this thread did). Marketing is part of the environment and usually relies on cliches because that seems to click most easily (because of the above reasons, I guess) but can practically promote all kinds of ideas -> yes, they are giving impulses and try to change or stenghten our preconceptions by the way they market something. Of course there are many examples of 'false' categorizations of fragrances (eg. calling something masculine that smells like a pink powder puff) but nonetheless I think there are notes that register to us as masculine, feminine or universally appealing (unisex). Compositions dominated by notes of either side can be categorized in those categories, in my opinion. At least that actually makes it easier for customers to orientate (especially when one is not a fumehead knowing his stuff). It is prone to marketing manipulation or upholding preconceptions but still makes sense.

    Of course compositions usually contain masculine and feminine elements, just like men have a feminine side and women have a masculine side or like even salty meals often contain a grain of sugar (or ideally all the flavours). It's the way they are balanced that decides towards it leans. The grey area you speak of, is what I'd call unisex.

    Edit:
    With the OP in mind, I'd say, there's different kinds of men who wear 'female' perfumes:
    - those who wear female perfumes that are in fact just mislabeled and in reality are unisex or even leaning towards masculine
    - those who want to push their boundaries (same as those who say that there are no boundaries)
    - those who wear it because they want to be reminded of something (like the love of their love who wore this)
    - those who are feeling more feminine than masculine
    Last edited by Nasenmann; 26th September 2010 at 12:21 PM.

  9. #429

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    Of course compositions usually contain masculine and feminine elements, ...
    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    .. female perfumes that are in fact just mislabeled and in reality are unisex or even leaning towards masculine
    What are those masculine and feminine elements? Who exactly determines them? Do they change at different places and times? If they change, can they be called universal?

  10. #430

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by zliang View Post
    What are those masculine and feminine elements? Who exactly determines them? Do they change at different places and times? If they change, can they be called universal?
    I never came across a list nor have I enough experience in this field to be able to come up with one. A few examples from the top of my head:

    strawberry, rose, iris-> female
    oakmoss, vetiver, smoke -> masculine

    My guess is that many of these associations go back to the very early days of mankind.

  11. #431

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Pollux View Post

    Add historical facts - ie, Old Spice was targeted to women, proved a flop, rerelased for men.... and became a success.
    The first Old Spice product was a fragrance called Early American Old Spice for women, introduced in 1937. Old Spice for men followed in 1938.
    Merlin is my Hero.....

  12. #432

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    Edit:
    With the OP in mind, I'd say, there's different kinds of men who wear 'female' perfumes:
    - those who wear female perfumes that are in fact just mislabeled and in reality are unisex or even leaning towards masculine
    - those who want to push their boundaries (same as those who say that there are no boundaries)
    - those who wear it because they want to be reminded of something (like the love of their love who wore this)
    - those who are feeling more feminine than masculine
    Hmmmm.... interesting.

  13. #433

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Suppressor View Post
    I absolutely agree with the topic starter and I have posted the same in another topic where things got a little out of hand.
    Oh wow, to be honest i saw that, it was funny because i thought of this like a day before i was what you said, so i decided to make it a topic of discssion

  14. #434

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Nasenmann does have a certain point there with his categorisation why men may wear 'feminine scents'. Another element - not contradicting the others - I have written as my signature below.

  15. #435

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    With the OP in mind, I'd say, there's different kinds of men who wear 'female' perfumes:
    - those who wear female perfumes that are in fact just mislabeled and in reality are unisex or even leaning towards masculine
    - those who want to push their boundaries (same as those who say that there are no boundaries)
    - those who wear it because they want to be reminded of something (like the love of their love who wore this)
    - those who are feeling more feminine than masculine
    I happily wear, for example, Serge Lutens' Sa Majesté La Rose (a 'feminine' scent in some people's book) but I really don't identify with any of the above categories. I just like roses.

    Without wanting to get off-topic, whilst it is true that the old 'nature vs. nurture' debate is still raging in the (social-/ )sciences, I really believe there is enough cross-cultural evidence to show that, what is assumed in one place and time to be 'masculine' or 'feminine', rarely, if ever, holds good universally.

    Who then, gifted with intelligence and freedom, wants to have their choices limited by the vagaries of 'fashion' or 'culture'?

  16. #436

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    I get many unsolicited compliments from women when I am wearing fragrances marketed to women. Especially fragrances such as Hypnotic Poison, Apres l'Ondee, Sous le Vent and Boise Torride. Women tell me they find them sexy. I also get great compliments on the scents many people on the boards call "boring" such as Guerlain Homme, and Bleu de Chanel.

  17. #437

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    That's my point though:
    Males and females get birthed with several differences in all kinds of areas and I believe that this extends to a degree on what they like and what they dislike. There's an ongoing debate under scientists about how much the environment (e.g. education, marketing etc.) and how much is inherited (recurring cliches). We can be sure that both are factors so that leads me to think that:

    For practical reasons evolution lead to different preference-patterns for males and females -> that lead to some kind of hardcoding in our genes and is inherited by birth -> that leads to some preconceptions (and cliches) of what we perceive as masculine or feminine.
    However...
    Humans are also able to redefine themselve to some extend ("ability to adapt") as reaction to their environment. Going against their hardwired preconceptions is possible (but might be perceived by others or themselves as irritating/unusual/strange/etc) and could be called "pushing their boundaries" (as someone in this thread did). Marketing is part of the environment and usually relies on cliches because that seems to click most easily (because of the above reasons, I guess) but can practically promote all kinds of ideas -> yes, they are giving impulses and try to change or stenghten our preconceptions by the way they market something. Of course there are many examples of 'false' categorizations of fragrances (eg. calling something masculine that smells like a pink powder puff) but nonetheless I think there are notes that register to us as masculine, feminine or universally appealing (unisex). Compositions dominated by notes of either side can be categorized in those categories, in my opinion. At least that actually makes it easier for customers to orientate (especially when one is not a fumehead knowing his stuff). It is prone to marketing manipulation or upholding preconceptions but still makes sense.

    Of course compositions usually contain masculine and feminine elements, just like men have a feminine side and women have a masculine side or like even salty meals often contain a grain of sugar (or ideally all the flavours). It's the way they are balanced that decides towards it leans. The grey area you speak of, is what I'd call unisex.

    Edit:
    With the OP in mind, I'd say, there's different kinds of men who wear 'female' perfumes:
    - those who wear female perfumes that are in fact just mislabeled and in reality are unisex or even leaning towards masculine
    - those who want to push their boundaries (same as those who say that there are no boundaries)
    - those who wear it because they want to be reminded of something (like the love of their love who wore this)
    - those who are feeling more feminine than masculine
    I wear feminine frags and I'm not:
    - searching for mislabeled fragrances that are in reality unissex or towards male
    - not looking to push my boundaries
    - don't want to be reminded of someone
    - don't feel more feminine than masculine

    I cannot understand why is so hard for some people to see fragrances as aromas and art. Is what i search for, without looking in any of this kind of evolutionary sex differences that seems to be what everyone is thinking when trying or wearing a fragrance. I just like some smells, and if they aren't fully executed in a male fragrance, i'll search for something marketed female, period. Or if i try something that is marketed for woman and i love the smell, i will not think that the aroma will make me remind of someone, or that will make me look better than anyone, or that aroma will make me push my boundaries or whatever the non sense argument that seems to pop to justify the use. I only search for notes, for the bunch of notes that i like or that i want to understand. It's so more simple and fun when you leave behind all the constraints and complicated ideas and focus on what really matter: the combination of aromas that produces something pleasant, unique and that fullfill you. It's what I search on a fragrance.

  18. #438
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by zliang View Post
    What are those masculine and feminine elements? Who exactly determines them? Do they change at different places and times? If they change, can they be called universal?
    Excellent questions. One hypothetical answer is that fragrance preference differences are mostly or even completely historical, where that includes all culture, marketing, etc. This could mean that the differences are somewhat arbitrary, but that they simply reflect the existence of sexual dimorphism, rather than its exact nature. At the other extreme, there may be statistical preferences due to the dimorphism itself. My current view is that there is a rather fuzzy dipolar dimorphism in fragrance preference, which reflects more directly the cultural handling of dimorphism, rather than the dimorphism itself.

    Translation: gender differences in fragrance reflect marketing, which through the scientific innocence of the desire to make a buck, reflects fairly accurately the somewhat arbitrary cultural desires to reflect or not reflect dimorphism. If there is a biological component, it's likely small and hidden, but may be discernible by cross-cultural statistics.
    * * * *

  19. #439
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    I wear feminine frags and I'm not:
    - searching for mislabeled fragrances that are in reality unissex or towards male
    - not looking to push my boundaries
    - don't want to be reminded of someone
    - don't feel more feminine than masculine

    I cannot understand why is so hard for some people to see fragrances as aromas and art. Is what i search for, without looking in any of this kind of evolutionary sex differences that seems to be what everyone is thinking when trying or wearing a fragrance. I just like some smells, and if they aren't fully executed in a male fragrance, i'll search for something marketed female, period. Or if i try something that is marketed for woman and i love the smell, i will not think that the aroma will make me remind of someone, or that will make me look better than anyone, or that aroma will make me push my boundaries or whatever the non sense argument that seems to pop to justify the use. I only search for notes, for the bunch of notes that i like or that i want to understand. It's so more simple and fun when you leave behind all the constraints and complicated ideas and focus on what really matter: the combination of aromas that produces something pleasant, unique and that fullfill you. It's what I search on a fragrance.
    Again, I am in total agreement.
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  20. #440

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    While reading this thread I have got the sensation that some people think there has got to be an justification why so many of BNs break out of those stereotypes.

    All this "natural order" and "sorting" is really frustrating to me.
    I mean why, for the love of god, does there have to be a reason to like whatever you like?

    I, for one, simply wear what I like and I neither do I think this reflects on some kind of missing masculinity on my part nor do I try to subconsciously push my own horizon further.

    Jasmine only appealing to women? Thats ridiculous, heck, we all have got the same olfactorial buds.
    And about that pink/blue - girls/boys thing, lately I have seen considerably more guys wearing pink than girls.
    And since many guys wear frags in order to attract women wouldn't it make sense to wear notes that "naturally" appeal to women insteat of something society has established as "masculine"?


    There have been so many great posts in this thread that I think the topic would have been settled if it WAS ABLE to be settled. We wont come to a conclusion here.
    Ultimately there's no discussion of tastes and it's certainly not worth raising arguments over it.


    Just my two cents.
    Smellin good

  21. #441

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by timaru View Post
    While reading this thread I have got the sensation that some people think there has got to be an justification why so many of BNs break out of those stereotypes.

    All this "natural order" and "sorting" is really frustrating to me.
    I mean why, for the love of god, does there have to be a reason to like whatever you like?

    I, for one, simply wear what I like and I neither do I think this reflects on some kind of missing masculinity on my part nor do I try to subconsciously push my own horizon further.

    Jasmine only appealing to women? Thats ridiculous, heck, we all have got the same olfactorial buds.
    And about that pink/blue - girls/boys thing, lately I have seen considerably more guys wearing pink than girls.
    And since many guys wear frags in order to attract women wouldn't it make sense to wear notes that "naturally" appeal to women insteat of something society has established as "masculine"?


    There have been so many great posts in this thread that I think the topic would have been settled if it WAS ABLE to be settled. We wont come to a conclusion here.
    Ultimately there's no discussion of tastes and it's certainly not worth raising arguments over it.


    Just my two cents.
    Word!

  22. #442

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    I never came across a list nor have I enough experience in this field to be able to come up with one. A few examples from the top of my head:

    strawberry, rose, iris-> female
    oakmoss, vetiver, smoke -> masculine

    My guess is that many of these associations go back to the very early days of mankind.
    Let's take oakmoss. It's an important component in chypres. So, what was the first chypre? AFAIK, it was Chypre de Coty (1917) which was marketed for women. Did they get it wrong?

    Also, rose. It is commonly used in male fragrances in the Middle East.

  23. #443

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by timaru View Post
    And since many guys wear frags in order to attract women wouldn't it make sense to wear notes that "naturally" appeal to women insteat of something society has established as "masculine"?
    Because to women, they smell nice, not attractive. You might just smell like one of her girlfriends.

  24. #444

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    Because to women, they smell nice, not attractive. You might just smell like one of her girlfriends.
    Not really

  25. #445

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    Because to women, they smell nice, not attractive. You might just smell like one of her girlfriends.
    I think that most of the ones who wears feminine marked fragrances choose those that works for them. A fragrance may work on one man but the same fragrance may not work on another man. I know girls who like to wear masculine marked fragrances. Does that make them lose their femineity? No, not at all. Girls use masculine fragrances on the same basis as many men choose some feminine marked fragrances: BECAUSE IT WORKS ON THEM.
    Last edited by Siifter; 26th September 2010 at 05:02 PM.

  26. #446

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    Not really
    please explain

  27. #447

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    please explain
    The underlying scent of a man is a bit musky, while a woman is more ambery. That gives fragrances slightly different characteristics on men vs. women.
    Last edited by tott; 26th September 2010 at 05:18 PM.

  28. #448

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    Because to women, they smell nice, not attractive. You might just smell like one of her girlfriends.
    Interesting, then, how I get compliments that contain words like "sexy" or "hot" not only for sweet, floral ("womentypical") mens frags but especially for Shalimar etc.
    All woman that compliment on these are gay I take it?
    Smellin good

  29. #449

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by timaru View Post
    Interesting, then, how I get compliments that contain words like "sexy" or "hot" not only for sweet, floral ("womentypical") mens frags but especially for Shalimar etc.
    All woman that compliment on these are gay I take it?
    Come on dude, you know thats not what im saying, thats my entire point since you mentioned Shalimar, certain notes in Shalimar are easily found in masculine scents.... so if you are called 'sexy' and 'hot', might be because they recognise the femininity in Shalimar, with that 'masculine' note thats appealing to a woman.

  30. #450

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    please explain
    A scent can smell quite different on a man and on a woman. Since your skin will take part on the final aroma on you, this doesn't mean that wearing a flower fragrance or something that woman may enjoy will make you smell like a woman.
    But you'll only be able to see this if you sample lots of woman fragrances too. If not sample on you, you'll not understand and will still think that this misconceived idea is true. And it isn't true.

  31. #451

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    Come on dude, you know thats not what im saying, thats my entire point since you mentioned Shalimar, certain notes in Shalimar are easily found in masculine scents.... so if you are called 'sexy' and 'hot', might be because they recognise the femininity in Shalimar, with that 'masculine' note thats appealing to a woman.
    Not really too. But, again, it's hard to explain this for someone that seems restricted to what the industry says you i'll like or you won't like

  32. #452

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Top Notes
    Bergamot .


    Middle Notes
    Iris, Opopanax .

    Base Notes
    Vanilla.

    Which is the masculine note, then?
    I dont think any of these is fitting into your pattern of typical masculine.


    I didnt mean the sarcasm quite that bad but as I said earlier, I just dont agree

    And I think I will leave it at that. Really I have no intention to contribute to a dispute if not even argument that IMO cant be settled satisfactactory for both sides on a common point.
    Smellin good

  33. #453

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    A scent can smell quite different on a man and on a woman. Since your skin will take part on the final aroma on you, this doesn't mean that wearing a flower fragrance or something that woman may enjoy will make you smell like a woman.
    But you'll only be able to see this if you sample lots of woman fragrances too. If not sample on you, you'll not understand and will still think that this misconceived idea is true. And it isn't true.
    While i understand the concept, and it makes sense, personally, i know what i can smell, regardless of skin. The scent of my skin isn't that strong unless i apply something to it. Perfume is stronger than skin scent, and regardless of how strong the skin scent is, i think i'll be able to tell something that smells very floral on someone.

  34. #454

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by timaru View Post
    Which is the masculine note, then?
    Remember, when i started this post, i did say some notes are compounded differently, so a vanilla in a 'feminine' scent might not be the same smelling vanilla in a 'masculine' scent.

  35. #455

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    ...
    I said I'l leave it at that
    Smellin good

  36. #456

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    While i understand the concept, and it makes sense, personally, i know what i can smell, regardless of skin. The scent of my skin isn't that strong unless i apply something to it. Perfume is stronger than skin scent, and regardless of how strong the skin scent is, i think i'll be able to tell something that smells very floral on someone.
    Well, if you just think this way, there's nothing that can be said.

  37. #457

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    This scent gender apologia is headed nowhere and it's become a daily debate on this forum. Be honest about what? Guys get a life, it's only perfume.

  38. #458

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    I don't think that is gender apologia, a dispute or an argument.

    See, I am sorry if some of you get the impression that I think there is anything wrong with men wearing fragrances that are categorized as feminine. I don't and I have been known to do it myself. Personally, I feel a bit uncomfortable if I think I smell too feminine in public and I am not as keen on pushing my boundaries too far but to each his own, right? I actually kind of admire people who are doing that on purpose and don't care for the opinion of others.

    All I say is that I believe that there are hardwired preconceptions and that the three categories are justified because they do make it easier for me and many others to find fragrances with certain characteristics.

    As has been noticed, I should also have added that some people don't need any reason to wear something but the artitstry of it. That is something so obvious, that I didn't even think of it...

  39. #459
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by timaru View Post
    Top Notes
    Bergamot .


    Middle Notes
    Iris, Opopanax .

    Base Notes
    Vanilla.

    Which is the masculine note, then?
    I dont think any of these is fitting into your pattern of typical masculine.


    I didnt mean the sarcasm quite that bad but as I said earlier, I just dont agree

    And I think I will leave it at that. Really I have no intention to contribute to a dispute if not even argument that IMO cant be settled satisfactactory for both sides on a common point.
    Given Shalimar's historical role as an early, genre-defining oriental, its fundamental structure (vanilla, citrus, florals, amber/opoponax + or - civet) is to some extent or another the basis for countless "unisex" and "masculine" orientals, including, though hardly limited to:

    Jaïpur Homme
    Habit Rouge
    Pi
    Musc Ravageur
    New York
    Maharadjah
    Burberry London
    Roma Uomo
    Cristobal

    Dolce & Gabbana pour Homme
    JHL
    Escada Homme
    Eau Lente
    Opium pour Homme
    Rochas Man
    Body Kouros
    Égoïste
    Minotaure

    ...even Bulgari Black (just add rubber)!

  40. #460

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Even I'm getting tired of this gender stereotype thing. Who could have thought of that? Me? The one who have started 75 "Is this or that fragrances wearable for a man?"-threads. The administrators should put up a thread policy where these sort of threads is strictly prohibited.

  41. #461

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Killer_Vavoom View Post
    This scent gender apologia is headed nowhere and it's become a daily debate on this forum. Be honest about what? Guys get a life, it's only perfume.
    First of all, this is a discussion for those who wish to be involved in it, this is a website about PERFUME, and ALL things perfume would be discussed, if it was only perfume, this website wouldn't exist, so while i can appreciate you taking the time to click on this forum discussion and leave your opinion, i dont appreciate the 'get a life' comment, especially seeing as you are on this website just like the rest of us.

  42. #462

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Siifter View Post
    Even I'm getting tired of this gender stereotype thing. Who could have thought of that? Me? The one who have started 75 "Is this or that fragrances wearable for a man?"-threads. The administrators should put up a thread policy where these sort of threads is strictly prohibited.
    why? because you say so? excuse me if there are people who wish to discuss this kind of thing, you clicked on this post, you got involved, i didnt tell you to, so if you dont like these kind of threads, dont click on them, its that simple I have the right just like you do to talk about all things concerning perfume. and its not stereotyping, im starting a discussion for people who are INTERESTED, if you are not interested, dont get involved. I think the administrators should prohibit so called perfume know it all's that leave comments that discourage people from talking about what they want to talk about.

  43. #463

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by rickbr View Post
    Not really too. But, again, it's hard to explain this for someone that seems restricted to what the industry says you i'll like or you won't like
    Im not restricted to anything sir, If you can show me where i said i prefer mens fragrance because im a man then i will agree with you, it seems funny how some people think buying fragrances according to gender is a bad thing, you have to excuse those of us who just want to smell nice....

  44. #464

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Ken_Russell View Post
    As many experienced Basenoters correctly pointed out, long I before did, the masculine/feminine separation came very late, in comparison to the true age of perfume history from day one onwards and was initially there mainly for marketing purposes

    Besides, I do find myself all the time discovering truly masculine notes in e.g. Le Dix by Balenciaga, the female Opium by YSL or Ispahan by Yves Rocher
    The genderfication of scent is only about 100 years old or so. In the past, people (who could afford it, that is) just used fragrance--period.

    I agree with Ken that it's all marketing. Colour the bottle pink and it will sell to women; colour it dark blue, and it will sell to men.

    Case in point, I find Womanity very gender neutral. Of course, the juice is pale pink and the bottle covered in "artsy" decor, and the name has "woman" in it.

    Still, TRY the scent and use the nose to judge.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  45. #465

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    First of all, this is a discussion for those who wish to be involved in it, this is a website about PERFUME, and ALL things perfume would be discussed, if it was only perfume, this website wouldn't exist, so while i can appreciate you taking the time to click on this forum discussion and leave your opinion, i dont appreciate the 'get a life' comment, especially seeing as you are on this website just like the rest of us.
    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    why? because you say so? excuse me if there are people who wish to discuss this kind of thing, you clicked on this post, you got involved, i didnt tell you to, so if you dont like these kind of threads, dont click on them, its that simple I have the right just like you do to talk about all things concerning perfume. and its not stereotyping, im starting a discussion for people who are INTERESTED, if you are not interested, dont get involved. I think the administrators should prohibit so called perfume know it all's that leave comments that discourage people from talking about what they want to talk about.
    You seem to be very good at pointing the finger at others and scolding them. Of course, you yourself are quite rude with your thread title. "Be honest". As if men who appreciate scents marked as feminine are liars or "BSing". Not only is your thread title rude, but you refuse to appreciate the responses of others.
    Seeking: Bottles/decants : of Feeling Man, Gucci pour Homme, Essence of John Galliano, Nicole Miller (vintage), Opium pour Homme, Oxford & Cambridge...etc.

    Seeking decant/sample of Jil Sander Feeling Man, Cacharel Nemo, Bijan for Men EDC, Lanvin for Men, Giorgio VIP, Il Lancetti and other old school frags ....etc. I have samples to swap.

    More HERE
    Please PM me !

  46. #466

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfacing View Post
    You seem to be very good at pointing the finger at others and scolding them. Of course, you yourself are quite rude with your thread title. "Be honest". As if men who appreciate scents marked as feminine are liars or "BSing". Not only is your thread title rude, but you refuse to appreciate the responses of others.
    First of all, im a grown man and i am not interested in internet forum arguments, the 'be honest' comment is applicable to some, as i first said this is not applicable to all, you know full well im not saying what you are implying, and its funny how no one else commented and said it was rude, but as soon as someone posts something i dont appreciate and i reply im the one thats held into account..... whatever man, i dont appreciate other people's responses who dismiss these threads (and therefore me) because i wish to talk about this... im not pointing fingers at anyone, im simply responding to some of the unfair criticism that is pointed at these threads. So thank you for your response, its greatly appreciated!

  47. #467

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by mrclmind View Post
    I get many unsolicited compliments from women when I am wearing fragrances marketed to women. Especially fragrances such as Hypnotic Poison, Apres l'Ondee, Sous le Vent and Boise Torride. Women tell me they find them sexy. I also get great compliments on the scents many people on the boards call "boring" such as Guerlain Homme, and Bleu de Chanel.
    Lucky you! Perhaps it has nothing to do with those fragrances. Perhaps you've simply underestimated your own personal magnetism? As I understand it women will find a way to compliment a guy they find attractive.

    But back to topic, it seems we all have various reasons for indulging in these feminine-marketed scents. Some enjoy them for the notes and composition. Others may be experimenting with socially constructed boundaries to determine what works well under specific social situations. And then there are those who rationalize it in terms of what they perceive to be 'masculine' or 'feminine' notes. All of these arguments sound sensible to me. I don't really see why one person's considered opinion should override that of another when all of them could co-exist side-by-side. Truth, as I understand it, has many facets. But forcing opinions down people's throats has only one - it's called 'tunnel vision'.
    Last edited by Diamondflame; 26th September 2010 at 10:39 PM.

  48. #468

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest


  49. #469

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    Lucky you! Perhaps it has nothing to do with those fragrances. Perhaps you've simply underestimated your own personal magnetism? As I understand it women will find a way to compliment a guy they find attractive.

    But back to topic, it seems we all have various reasons for indulging in these feminine-marketed scents. Some enjoy them for the notes and composition. Others may be experimenting with socially constructed boundaries to determine what works well under specific social situations. And then there are those who rationalize it in terms of what they perceive to be 'masculine' or 'feminine' notes. All of these arguments sound sensible to me. I don't really see why one person's considered opinion should override that of another when all of them could co-exist side-by-side. Truth, as I understand it, has many facets. But forcing opinions down people's throats has only one - it's called 'tunnel vision'.
    I'm in agreement.

  50. #470

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    It's so funny that I've been gone from Basenotes for months, and this is still a hot topic here (and of course I still get drawn into the conversation). I don't think the people who are against men wearing feminine fragrances will ever get over their prejudice. But I don't really understand why it's such an issue. It's not like anyone is tying them down and forcing them to wear a feminine fragrance or anything. If you don't like something, don't spray it on yourself. If you are wearing something you don't like, the great news is that perfumes don't last forever, so the scent will be gone very soon.

    Live and let live I always say.
    Last edited by mrclmind; 27th September 2010 at 12:33 AM.

  51. #471
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    The genderfication of scent is only about 100 years old or so. In the past, people (who could afford it, that is) just used fragrance--period.
    Thanks for the reminder, Primrose. People really need to ponder this one to get around the conditioning. The overall historical neutrality of fragrance use and the frequent flip-flopping of gender-typing of notes is the red pill of fragrance appreciation. Although there are occasional examples of sex differences in fragrance behavior in cultures throughout history, for the most part, fragrance has served as a differentiator between the haves and the have-nots. And, when there have been differences in fragrance behavior, it is interesting to see that these differences are often quite the opposite of what we NOW regard as masculine or feminine.

    Or take Blue Pill Pour Homme and go back to marketing's matrix.
    Last edited by Redneck Perfumisto; 27th September 2010 at 12:43 AM. Reason: Redundancy removed
    * * * *

  52. #472

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    I admittedly find it easier to wear fragrances with traditionally "masculine" notes and accords, but a lot of masculine fragrances simply bore the crap out of me. My favorite scents all seem to combine masculine and feminine accords in ways both subtle and not so, so that I get the best of both worlds. Neither extreme (uber-macho or uber-femme) really appeal to me, at least in terms of scents I actually want to wear. Hence my love of fragrances like Angel, Opium, Fahrenheit, Kouros, Dior Homme, and Aromatics Elixir; all of them, to a certain extent, cherry-pick from both sides of the gender divide in their note compositions and personalities.

  53. #473

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Question is: what would people from back then choose, if they had access to todays fragrances and to a daily shower.

  54. #474
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Nasenmann View Post
    Question is: what would people from back then choose, if they had access to todays fragrances and to a daily shower.
    Acqua di Gio Pour Homme for the women, Angel for the men, and Big Macs all around!

    Fragrance is probably one of the few technologies that can be dropped on a less technological culture without harm - but likely not without comedy.

    But seriously, it would be a fascinating experiment. We can observe cultural differences in fragrance preferences right here and now, but doing so with past cultures would be REALLY interesting.
    * * * *

  55. #475

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    Acqua di Gio Pour Homme for the women, Angel for the men, and Big Macs all around!

    Fragrance is probably one of the few technologies that can be dropped on a less technological culture without harm - but likely not without comedy.

    But seriously, it would be a fascinating experiment. We can observe cultural differences in fragrance preferences right here and now, but doing so with past cultures would be REALLY interesting.
    Scent is just scent. I agree with mrclmind that "live and let live," and I will add "to each his own." My old perfume poster boy, le Comte, would have said, "Chacun a son gout." He was fond of eau de Cologne and eau de jasmin.

    I recall having a female roommate from the Middle East who wore Brut. New to the U.S. and not aware of gender distinctions, she simply wore what appealed to her.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  56. #476

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    I think there's something about the title of this thread that comes across as slightly hostile, and it may have added some extra heat to a topic that's nearly always contentious. It's as though it's saying guys who wear female fragrances are being inherently dishonest by wearing them.

    Quote Originally Posted by mrclmind View Post
    It's not like anyone is tying them down and forcing them to wear a feminine fragrance or anything.
    Oh... OH... We weren't supposed to be doing that? Well now I feel silly. I had some vintage Poison ready and everything.

  57. #477
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    I recall having a female roommate from the Middle East who wore Brut. New to the U.S. and not aware of gender distinctions, she simply wore what appealed to her.
    Exactly. I can just imagine it - and the idea of an old "masculine" fougère - particularly Brut - on a woman sounds rather fashionable.

    There have been several cases where my wife complimented me very strongly on a new fragrance, and immediately got a worried look on her face - like it was TOO appealing to her. The next question out of her mouth is whether it was for women. I usually toy with her at that point on the whole gender thing.
    * * * *

  58. #478
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by Sugandaraja View Post
    I think there's something about the title of this thread that comes across as slightly hostile, and it may have added some extra heat to a topic that's nearly always contentious. It's as though it's saying guys who wear female fragrances are being inherently dishonest by wearing them.
    I felt something similar before reading the actual post. I was thinking that maybe it implied people who said they were wearing "feminines" weren't always being honest about the reason. But after reading the post, I felt it was more an invitation to be honest and not simply spout the BN party line - whatever one might perceive that to be.
    * * * *

  59. #479

    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    why? because you say so? excuse me if there are people who wish to discuss this kind of thing, you clicked on this post, you got involved, i didnt tell you to, so if you dont like these kind of threads, dont click on them, its that simple I have the right just like you do to talk about all things concerning perfume. and its not stereotyping, im starting a discussion for people who are INTERESTED, if you are not interested, dont get involved. I think the administrators should prohibit so called perfume know it all's that leave comments that discourage people from talking about what they want to talk about.
    It was a joke. Couldnt you tell?

  60. #480
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    Default Re: Male 'female fragrance wearers'......be honest

    Quote Originally Posted by jlouismi View Post
    why? because you say so? excuse me if there are people who wish to discuss this kind of thing, you clicked on this post, you got involved, i didnt tell you to, so if you dont like these kind of threads, dont click on them, its that simple I have the right just like you do to talk about all things concerning perfume. and its not stereotyping, im starting a discussion for people who are INTERESTED, if you are not interested, dont get involved. I think the administrators should prohibit so called perfume know it all's that leave comments that discourage people from talking about what they want to talk about.
    I wouldn't dream of censoring anyone on Basenotes. You have every right to post anything you truly want to discuss, and of course, people have every right to respond. That includes the right to point out that:

    1. What you're posting has been thoroughly discussed in the past.

    2. They disagree with your point of view.

    3. They may find your manner of presenting the issue or participating in the discussion a bit confrontational.

    It has often happened in the past that newer members on Basenotes (I notice that you joined about three months ago) have been questioned, or even rebuked, for being argumentative or somewhat overheated.

    I would like to say that I believe once one launches a thread, while one may feel a certain attachment to it and to the responses it evokes, the thread belongs to the community, and others feel just as free to be frank in their expression as the original poster. What is expected, however, is a certain degree of civility in the conversation, and enough respect for other members to avoid overreacting and becoming heated in one's manner of expression.

    I feel that the last sentence in your post which I quoted comes a little too close to stepping over a line. As a long-time observer on Basenotes, I have seen that newer members who persist in coming across as that heated are occasionally the ones who get themselves banned, and not older members who merely observe that a thread is going over what seems old territory for long-term members.

    I assure you that I think your posts seem quite interesting, and that I admire your passion for scents. I would simply say you might want to moderate your tone, at least to the extent of avoiding expressions such as "so called perfume know it all's" (sic) and asking the "administrators" (I think you mean the moderators) to ban entire classes of people. That comes across as being a kind of ad hominem statement, a sort of personal attack on the person(s) disagreed with. I believe that we are all here to learn, and that any understanding that we may have gained is held in the humble knowledge that we have received it from others or from our own experience and long, hard efforts at research. I have never read any Basenotes member describe him/herself as an "expert" (not even the industry professionals who post here). I can only conclude that in using the expression "so-called," you are the one doing the calling. And no one likes to be characterized in a negative way.

    If this seems to be a rebuke to you, please take it as the gentlest possible one. So forgive me for giving unsolicited advice, but I assure you that I mean it entirely in a friendly way, as a means of helping you enjoy your time here in the most constructive possible fashion. Please don't censor yourself, but please do consider the feelings of others whenever you may disagree with them. Peace, brother, and since I haven't had the pleasure of saying it before, Welcome.
    Last edited by JaimeB; 27th September 2010 at 09:51 AM.
    Yr good bud,

    JaimeB

    "Why spend life seeking that which does not satisfy? Why remain a slave, when freedom waits? Let your life shine; illumine the world with your truth!"

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