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  1. #1

    Default Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    I applied Guerlain Vetiver to the filter of my Space Gard (sic) High Efficiecy Air Cleaner and cranked the thermostat so the furnace would cycle.

    I am in Vetiver Heaven, the whole house smells Guerlain-y although the warm air was primarily the hesperidic topnotes.

    Waiting to determine longevity, etc.

    If this works, I am going to disassemble the air ducts in my car and apply it to those filters, too.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Hallo Veronica,

    I do the same with my washing machine when I wash my pullovers or underwear. It's a heaven!!!

  3. #3
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    Quarry's Avatar
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    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Imagination is intelligence having fun.
    In a world where 6 million people are added each month, every landscape matters.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Aprx 30 minutes / 2 ml. It was great while it lasted.

    I just don't want to go the diffuser route - well, maybe for in the car.

    They have diffuser rings for incandescent lamps but with three curious cats that could spell *t-r-o-u-b-l-e. Not to mention *f-i-r-e *h-a-z-a-r-d. I suppose I'd have to mix the EDT with jojoba or silicone-based oil so it wouldn't evaporate too quickly. And I was trying for constant whole-house coverage.

    Back to the drawing board.

    ___________________

    Alicka61: Have you tried the vetiver-scented handkerchief with the delicates in the dryer trick?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    I like science experiments, but why not just use a soapstone diffuser? Your house will smell like any fragrance you put into it for hours. I prefer essential oils with mine, however.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    I LOVE science experiments. The more dangerous the better!

    The whole house? Soapstone? Hmmm....

  7. #7

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    The whole house? Soapstone? Hmmm....
    You fill the reservoir with water, and add your fragrance to it. Below the reservoir, a tea candle warms the water. I guess there's a minimal fire hazard here. Nothing worse than an ordinary candle, though.

    Oh, and some Holmes humidifiers have a little spot on top to add stuff like Vicks products. It works with fragrance as well. No hazards here.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Not to worry. After previous experiments which involved gasoline and electricity, I keep an A B C fire extinguisher handy.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Veronica
    I keep an A B C fire extinguisher handy.
    Impressive. I keep a CO2 extinguisher on hand in the garage and den, and a dry chemical one in the kitchen. (Did I mention I like science experiments, as well?)

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Veronica, Octothorpe, not to be a Dolly Levi here, but you make a lovely couple.
    In a world where 6 million people are added each month, every landscape matters.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters

    Quote Originally Posted by Quarry
    Veronica, Octothorpe, not to be a Dolly Levi here, but you make a lovely couple.
    Ooops... I'm already taken. At least until the drugs wear off. Besides... Minnesotans and Wisconsinites are sworn enemies. Didn't you hear?

  12. #12

    Default Re: Science Experiment: Furnace Filters


    I've been doing that air conditioner trick for a while now with some of my frags that i don't wear but still like and want to sniff. Nothing complicated about it. Just give your air filter a few spritzes (right through the metal filter guard) whenever you want to scent the house. It doesn't matter if the unit is blowing hot or cold air. It will almost instantly permeate the whole house and last 30 min to an hour.

    As far as a diffuser...

    I use those porous ceramic light bulb rings for oils and perfumes. To use with a perfume, just spray several sprays into the grooved side, add a little water, let it soak into the ring, then put onto a 60-100 watt light bulb. As long as you let all the liquid soak into the ring before putting it onto a light bulb, there should be no fire-hazard. I have found that a 60 watt bulb is about the minimum to produce enough heat to activate the oil or frag.

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