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  1. #1

    Default Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Got a package of samples:
    I've decided I don't have the same tastes as Luca Turin (great nose aside). Beyond Paradise was DBF on me, quite awful, and I can't really believe he called Tommy Girl by Tommy Hilfiger a great American scent. It turned slightly ozonic/synthetic, and didn't seem special enough to rate 'great'.

    Maybe he's part of the reason we're subjected to so many hairsprayish floral, synthetic/ozonic fragrances anymore - his nose sails right past that stuff.
    Of course, not everyone has the problems with synthetic florals I do. :'( When I get that department store reaction, it distorts the other notes, so in reality, I can't make any judgment call on the scent other than it's synthetic smelling. Which includes both Tommy Girl and Beyond Paradise. The synthetic that's giving me trouble, his nose seems to love.

    I know the synthetic usage in fragrances is increasing just by the experience I've been having with older fragrance nips I win on ebay. Many of those turn out to be pleasant but forgettable florals, which I have absolutely no problem wearing. It's been nice wearing them, whether they're memorable or not, because I can wear them so easily and they really are kind of pleasant! That's not an experience I'm used to having with a department store floral. So I know things have changed with the florals.
    What with all the newer, unusual fragrance notes and more extensive use of synthetic notes, fragrances have become more of a mine field, and more of a quest. I don't recall my mother and her friends saying the kinds of things we say about perfumes now... I do miss being able to just put on a floral, and whether it was outstanding or not, at least it was pleasant. BTW, I do like Quelque Fleurs Original. It seems quite pleasant and non-reactive.

  2. #2
    Ladylonestar
    Guest

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Flathorn, what does "DBF" mean? :-?

    To this day I haven't even sniffed Tommy Girl. Guess it's time I give it a try. As for Beyond Paradise, I don't like it. However, one of our former members, who also doesn't like Beyond Paradise, smelled something great on a co-worker and was surprised to find out that she was wearing Beyond Paradise.

    I don't recall my mother and her friends saying the kinds of things we say about perfumes now... I do miss being able to just put on a floral, and whether it was outstanding or not, at least it was pleasant.
    No, my mother didn't either. But neither did I until a few years ago when I discovered a fragrance chat site. Independence Day! I never even knew there were fragrance categories/families until that time. I wore what I loved to smell and I still do. Even today it's rare to find people who discuss fragrances as we do, except online, of course. And perfume blogs are cropping up almost daily.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Quote Originally Posted by Ladylonestar
    what does "DBF" mean?
    It's Death By Flowers - a horrid thing to do to your nose.

    I would have dismissed Tommy's Girl if Luca hadn't rated it so highly. Now I'm merely mystified. I suppose if he has the ability to smell a wide range of notes, he can deem certain fragrances complex and cohesive that I can't get the full impact or nuances of, which is what I believe must be going on there. I was surprised as I thought it was somewhat generic. Who knows until at least a decade has passed, which fragrances will be representative of their time, and yet be able to transcend it and become a stand-alone classic. I certainly can't. But, that being said, I don't need to like or wear it if it doesn't work for me. I think part of being a 'good' nose must to also be a fairly 'universal' nose, which I can never be. My chemistry and nose is so decidedly chypre I feel I can hardly give advice or recommendations other than say "If you like chypres, you may like this..."

    How the internet changes things, from the small to the large. Ten years ago, I would have found it inconceivable a person such as me, who loved smells all her life, but didn't equate it to perfumes, or lived in an environment perfumes were an accepted part of (I grew up on a homestead in the bush) could be sharing with others around the world who truly love and cherish the olfactory experience. I didn't know it existed, and I guess I would never have allowed it to blossom if I had, as my mother, only appreciated fragrance within it's social context, and never ventured on a fragrance forum.
    I also would never had the courage to go visit the old-timer up the lake wearing Eau Rosee. He said "How come you're wearing stinky water today?" (that's what the older ones call cologne). But you know, he commented on it later, and said it smelled like something his wife used to wear (she's long dead), and I know he meant it as a compliment, and it took him out of his day to day existence a bit. To me that's the power of a nice appropriate fragrance. For him, I think, it was the touch of femininity that was long absent from his life. I almost suspect he's kept the bottle of 'her perfume', whatever it is. I have to admit, after that experience, I saw the specialness of a signature scent - I certainly hope I can find one to fill that special spot.

  4. #4
    Ladylonestar
    Guest

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    It's *Death By Flowers...
    Thanks. I didn't know that. Learn something new almost every day!

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    My chemistry and nose is so decidedly chypre I feel I *can hardly give advice or recommendations other than say "If you like chypres, you may like this..." *
    And yet your wardrobe leans heavily toward florals and orientals, including florientals. *I think they far out number your chypres.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Quote Originally Posted by Ladylonestar
    And yet your wardrobe leans heavily toward florals and orientals, including florientals. I think they far out number your chypres.
    Yes - I see... that's interesting. Of course all the two starred ones are ones I'd swap in a heartbeat, and the three stars are so-so to me. But leaving them out, there are still lots of florientals/orientals. Perhaps I'm more versatile than I resigned myself to be. [smiley=2vrolijk_08.gif]

    When I first discovered my chypre tendencies, it seemed like every favorite fragrance turned out to be a chypre in disguise - one site said my favorite natural refreshing fragrance, Eau Dynamisante was a fresh chypre. Another, Comme Une Evidence, was called a floral chypre. It seemed to go on and on without let-up. I do tend to like that mossy note, but there were others I liked I had no idea were chypres or semi-chypres (Sublime was listed that way somewhere).
    Somewhat encouraging...
    I looked at your wardrobe - there's a few sweethearts there. Seeing L'Origan and Emeraude was a thrill. Do you think they're formulated the same as they were in the 60/70's? I've been reluctant to buy new bottles because there was some discussion they weren't the same. And Crepe De Chine - my mother used to wear that, but I haven't seen it in so long, I forgot about it. My sisters and I were forever using her fragrances on dates, and would wear ours the rest of the time. We always got more compliments on her selection than ours.

  6. #6
    Ladylonestar
    Guest

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    Yes - I see... that's interesting. Of course all the two starred ones are ones I'd swap in a heartbeat, and the three stars are so-so to me. But leaving them out, there are still lots of florientals/orientals.
    I don't recall exactly which ones without double-checking, but I think some of the chypres that are in your wardrobe are actually floral chypres.

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    Perhaps I'm more versatile than I resigned myself to be.
    It does seem so.

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    When I first discovered my chypre tendencies, it seemed like every favorite fragrance turned out to be a chypre in disguise - one site said my favorite natural refreshing fragrance, Eau Dynamisante was a fresh chypre. Another, *Comme Une Evidence, was called a floral chypre. It seemed to go on and on without let-up. I do tend to like that mossy note, but there were others I liked I had no idea were chypres or semi-chypres (Sublime was listed that way somewhere).
    Well, yes, there seems to be some disagreement from time to time when it comes to categories. I know Fendi is a chypre (another floral chypre) and to me, it leans far more to the oriental side, at least on my skin it does. As for Sublime, I've seen it categorized several ways including floral and, yes, it is listed as a chypre at osmoz.com (another floral chypre, in fact). To my nose, it's a floral.

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    Somewhat encouraging...
    Yep. Well, you may not be a "type". You may be like me -- you love what you love no matter the category.

    Quote Originally Posted by flathorn
    I looked at your wardrobe - there's a few sweethearts there. Seeing L'Origan and Emeraude was a thrill. Do you think they're formulated the same as they were in the 60/70's? I've been reluctant to buy new bottles because there was some discussion they weren't the same. And Crepe De Chine - my mother used to wear that, but I haven't seen it in so long, I forgot about it. *My sisters and I were forever using her fragrances on dates, and would wear ours the rest of the time. We always got more compliments on her selection than ours.
    Thank you. I don't know anything about L'Origan being reformulated. Well, for that matter, I don't know anything about Emeraude being reformulated either. I think it was Artisankey asking about this last year and we had some discussions. I purchased a vintage gift set off ebay. I can't say there's much difference, but the vintage is definitely aged, not really "off" after it's on the skin awhile but when first applied you can smell that "age" in it. It does seem to me that today's Emeraude that can be purchased at any drug store is much lighter than days of old, but it's still Emeraude. Emeraude and Chypre were my maternal grandmother's favorites. I even wore Emeraude in my early 20s.

    My Crepe de Chine is from Long Lost Perfume. It's beautiful -- somewhat like a blend of Estee and Aphrodisia. Please feel free to PM or email me if I have anything at all you'd like to sample -- and that includes chypres!

  7. #7

    Default Re: Tommy Girl /Beyond Paradise

    These two scents do nothing to me. Tommy Girl is somewhat better than other ozonic florals - it has some appealing citrusy fruity freshness. But it never rocked my world and I will be surprised if it ever will. Beyond Paradise has the obnoxious artificial floral notes that sting my nose. I guess this is what many refer to as "death by flowers". The colourful bottle is the best thing I can say about this perfume.
    Ayala Moriel, Perfumer
    Ayala Moriel Parfums http://www.ayalamoriel.com/
    Visit my SmellyBlog: http://www.smellyblog.com/

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