WWD.com

NEW YORK — For her fourth fragrance, pop icon Jennifer Lopez said she is looking to showcase a few facets that helped catapult her to stardom: among them, her vivacious energy and dance ability.

"Live Jennifer Lopez is probably revealing the core of my inner being, more an attitude and a way to think," Lopez told WWD. Her fragrance portfolio includes Glow by JLo, launched in September 2002; Still Jennifer Lopez, launched in October 2003, and Miami Glow, launched this February. The new addition launches in October. "[I see it as] a complex and still changing, evolving spirit with a constancy that is the fast-paced living, sexy, vibrant energy I express through anything I commit to."



The plan to head back to her roots, so to speak, was hatched after the decision was made to launch a new Lopez scent project. "When we decided to do a new fragrance, we looked back to what we had already," said Lopez. "Glow by JLo is about natural beauty, skin, youth. Still Jennifer Lopez is more sophisticated and for unique moments. So when I thought about what I really love, it clearly appeared that I had to say something about dance, the very first artistic passion I had and still have. I wanted to transmit all that energy; you know, the rhythm, that feeling of being totally in control.

"This fragrance is really complementary of the previous ones," continued Lopez. "All of them are different, but at the same time, a facet of my personality. [For instance,] Glow was more about intimacy, while Still was about sophistication and glamour."

The successful Lopez franchise is Lancaster's second-largest after Davidoff, and Catherine Walsh, senior vice president of cosmetics and American licenses for Lancaster Group Worldwide, has every intention of making Live as large as its predecessors. "We feel, hands down, that this fragrance will be very trendsetting — it goes to the core of who Jennifer is," said Walsh, noting that the brand did significant consumer research among a large database of Lopez fans at its jenniferlopezbeauty.com site.

As far as age targets go, Walsh noted that they're somewhat fluid. "With Glow, we had positioned it at 18- to 24-year-olds, and we saw 14- and 15-year-olds buying it; for Miami Glow, it was the same thing. Still Jennifer Lopez we'd positioned for the 25-plus market, and 18-year-olds bought it. No matter what we do, [we] found that this brand is youthful. Hands down, it starts around 18, but doesn't quite go to the 45-year-olds that Glow did at first."

Lancaster is aiming for a top-10 positioning with the scent. Walsh declined to give a dollar figure, although industry sources estimated that it could do $20 million to $25 million at retail in the U.S. in its first year on counter.

Live Jennifer Lopez, concocted by Lopez in cooperation with Dominique Ropion of International Flavors and Fragrances, is an upbeat fruity floral. Top notes are of sparkling Sicilian lemon, vivacious Italian orange and juicy pineapple; a heart of fruity redcurrant, heady peony and piquant violet, and a drydown of caramel, tonka beans, vanilla and sandalwood.

The lineup will include eaux de parfum in two sizes, 1.7 oz. for $39.50 and 3.4 oz. for $49.50, as well as a 6.7-oz. shower gel for $20 and a 6.7-oz. body lotion for $25. In selected global markets the portfolio will also include a 1-oz. eau de parfum. This size will not be distributed in the U.S.

The faceted glass bottle, which has touches of purple, yellow and green, appears to change shades depending on which way it is turned, noted Charlotta Perlangeli, vice president of global marketing for the Jennifer Lopez brand at Lancaster Worldwide. Lancaster will reinforce that feeling of constant movement with spinning platform displays in store. The bottle was designed by Lopez and Guy Williams.

The Lopez franchise is distributed in 60 countries, all of which will get Live Jennifer Lopez in October, with the exception of Austria, Switzerland and Germany. Those markets will get it in spring 2006. In the U.S., it will be available in 2,200 U.S. department stores.

Outside of the U.S., the United Kingdom, Germany, Spain, Italy and the Netherlands are large markets for the brand, said Perlangeli. Australia and Japan are also significant, and emerging markets for the Lopez oeuvre include China and Latin America, she added.

National print advertising, featuring an energetic Lopez dancing across the page, will break in November fashion, beauty and lifestyle magazines, added Perlangeli. It was shot by Jean-Baptiste Mondino. A TV campaign, the first the Lancaster team has ever done for the Lopez line, will begin running in early December. Also shot by Mondino and directed by Select's Olivier van Doorne, it features Lopez in 5-inch stilettos, energetically dancing.

"The war chest behind this will be huge," promised Walsh. "We plan on making this almost like the rebirth of the brand." That war chest will include more than 18 million scented strips and 25 million blowins, as well as eight million vials and scented postcards. As well, added Perlangeli, the brand is working on a number of Internet initiatives for the launch, including an interactive dancing game that will debut on jenniferlopezbeauty.com. Video installations featuring Lopez are planned in department stores.

Now that Lopez is on fragrance number four, the question naturally arises — are there more scents in store for her franchise? "If the success goes on, why not," Lopez said. "I truly enjoy developing fragrances and I have so many ideas that I'd like to explore."

Could one of those concepts include a men's scent for husband Marc Anthony? "One day, maybe," said Lopez, "but you know, before getting to a men's fragrance, I'd love really to build solid women's lines and to feel the right moment to develop a male fragrance."