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  1. #1

    Default Young Man/Old Man Scent

    What fragrances would you categorise as a young man's or an old man's scent and why ?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Oh man, you're just opening up a can of worms with this one.
    I believe this same question was posted recently, and things turned ugly quickly!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I think the only reason a person might associate a fragrance with a particular age bracket is that they have experienced people of that age wearing it or similar fragrance...or that they have not.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I generally think that these types of classifications are arbitrary. Everyone should wear the scent he likes, even if someone says it's for an old or young man. At most, there may be scents more or less suitable for a certain personality.

    If I had to choose some criteria by which to separate young man from old man scents, I'd say that the fresh and light fragrances are more suitable for young people, but that's just because youth equals in the eyes of the majority the fresh stage of ones life, both in terms of personality development and biological age of the body. A young man is fresh in the sense that he's been produced (conceived, born) not so long ago. If you see in a store a yoghurt which was manufactured in the same day and one that was manufactured a month ago, you'll say about the first that it's fresh and about the second that it's old.

    On the other hand, heavy, dark, sweet scents are associated with old people exactly because they are not fresh anymore, they are old, they've been produced long time ago and are close to the expiration term. So it would seem unsuitable for an old man to wear a fresh scent.

    I also heard about Eau Sauvage, Monsieur Givenchy and other fresh scents that are suitable for old man; but I think that's just because they know the year when those scents were produced, they know that those have been wored by individuals who are old today, and so they draw the conclusion that the scent it's suitable only for old people. If they wouldn't know the year when those fragrances were released I don't think they'll associate them with old people.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by Luca30
    ...
    On the other hand, heavy, dark, sweet scents are associated with old people exactly because they are not fresh anymore, they are old, they've been produced long time ago and are close to the expiration term.
    ...
    How close? Your own expiration term may long be there when Chanel 5, Guerlain's Habit Rouge, Musc Ravageur, or Koublai Khan are still going strong. Granny Smith and Beaujolais are also way beyond 'expiration term'.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by Luca30
    If you see in a store a yoghurt which was manufactured in the same day and one that was manufactured a month ago, you'll say about the first that it's fresh and about the second that it's old.
    I wholeheartedly agree about the yoghurt.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus
    How close? Your own expiration term may long be there when Chanel 5, Guerlain's Habit Rouge, Musc Ravageur, or Koublai Khan are still going strong. Granny Smith and Beaujolais are also way beyond 'expiration term'.
    I think you didn't understand. I wasnt talking about how long a heavy, dark scent will be manufactured. The Danone yoghurt may be still in production when I die, but that doesn't mean that all the particular yoghurts made under this brand will have more then a few days until they reach the expiration term.

    When people get old, they are not fresh (young) anymore, so many think that wearing fresh scents it's suitable for a young (fresh) man, while the heavy, dark scents are more suitable for older man exactly because they are not fresh (young) anymore; so if, for example, a 60 year old man would wear L'Eau d'Issey it could be accused that he's trying to look younger then he really is, because he's wearing a fresh scent which it's not very suitable for a decrepit body.
    Last edited by Luca; 29th June 2006 at 11:53 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Vintage Tabarome is one of scents said to be very appropriate for mature men. Are tobacco-heavy scents generally made for the mature user ?

  9. #9

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Like in all such matters, we are dealing with sociocultural constructions - of age as a category, as well as of what is associated with certain age brackets.

    The association of a certain scent with a certain age is thus entirely arbitrary - which could easily be proven by looking at highly variant scent perceptions in different cultures and historical epochs (the same applies to gender associations, an even more obvious example when it comes to perfumes - think Western Europe 20th century vs. 19th century, or Europe vs. Arab world).

    On the other hand, certain conventions can congeal in due time into traditions and almost appear self-evident and natural as a result. As pointed out, we would find a very rich and heavy scent, say Royal English Leather, out of place on a 16yr. old, as its qualities are associated with an established position in life, experience, maturity etc. We may also frown at a distinguished elderly gentleman bathed in CRAVE. But these are not just issues of age, obviously social status also plays its part. Fragrance, after all, was one of many means, and still is, of creating social distinction and projecting class membership - if only, say, in the supposedly 'classless' USA- by signifying financial prowess as well as a certain taste culture.

    In fan cultures, whether of wine, fragrances, or films, such social distinctions collapse, of course, as the obsessive preoccupation with what otherwise serves as a class/age/gender marker is transcended by a shared fetishization of the product at hand. Talking about basenotes here :-)))

    So, to get back to your question: what would be interesting to discuss is why certain fragrance qualities have come to be associated by some people with certain age brackets and what underlying motives there are for this - one might speculate that it involves maintaining/constructing one's own cultural identity by defining it against others ("this is old man stuff, I do not wear it because I am young and virile" or "this perfume is teenie crap, what I wear is distinguished and mature"). It can also evolve from collective generational experiences. If a generation of fathers happened to ubiquitously wear a mass market fragrance (soemthing only possible since the twentieth century) - say Old Spice, then the generation of sons might read this as a father = old man scent and reject it (or celebrate it) as such (as well as similar scents). Perhaps a current generation reared on aquatic-synthetic fragrances will grow old with this (though trends are so short lived these days) and it will transform from a hip young thing into an "old man" scent by 2040.

    I would not be surprised if some sociologist or cultural historian had worked on this. Lecture closed :-))
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    very aufschlussreich post, good_life. But please everyone, as KO said, this is a subject which gets heated very quickly. I urge everyone to take a look at this thread before posting any further: http://community.basenotes.net/showt...hlight=college

  11. #11

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by Luca30
    I think you didn't understand. ...
    Now that you expressed yourself more clearly, I am postive, I fail to understand. I was not exactly born in Cologne, but our favorite family bottles of 4711 and Imperial (Guerlain), are clearly not in question for a man who is maybe in your father's generation. All members of a bigger family use these. In Europe/my environment, nobody worries a second about my wearing M. Balmain until I die. In fact, they may be glad, I smell like a lemon and not like a yoghurt in decay!

    In general, European males consider their colognes an unimportant 'by the way', something rather personal like their hair, cut or dyed, a joke at times, a 'tatoo for the nose', and neither a philosophy nor a serious code of behavior! That may be very different in other parts of the world as I am now inclined to believe. But it does not worry me, as long as a lot of decent stuff is still produced here in abundance.
    Last edited by narcus; 30th June 2006 at 12:41 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life
    On the other hand, certain conventions can congeal in due time into traditions and almost appear self-evident and natural as a result. As pointed out, we would find a very rich and heavy scent, say Royal English Leather, out of place on a 16yr. old, as its qualities are associated with an established position in life, experience, maturity etc. We may also frown at a distinguished elderly gentleman bathed in CRAVE. But these are not just issues of age, obviously social status also plays its part. Fragrance, after all, was one of many means, and still is, of creating social distinction and projecting class membership - if only, say, in the supposedly 'classless' USA- by signifying financial prowess as well as a certain taste culture.


    So, to get back to your question: what would be interesting to discuss is why certain fragrance qualities have come to be associated by some people with certain age brackets and what underlying motives there are for this - one might speculate that it involves maintaining/constructing one's own cultural identity by defining it against others ("this is old man stuff, I do not wear it because I am young and virile" or "this perfume is teenie crap, what I wear is distinguished and mature"). It can also evolve from collective generational experiences. If a generation of fathers happened to ubiquitously wear a mass market fragrance (soemthing only possible since the twentieth century) - say Old Spice, then the generation of sons might read this as a father = old man scent and reject it (or celebrate it) as such (as well as similar scents). Perhaps a current generation reared on aquatic-synthetic fragrances will grow old with this (though trends are so short lived these days) and it will transform from a hip young thing into an "old man" scent by 2040.

    I would not be surprised if some sociologist or cultural historian had worked on this. Lecture closed :-))

    I agree wholeheartedly with everything in each of these paragraphs. Excellent post, good_life. If only I had time to make my basenotes posts so thorough and eloquent. It's all about the users knowledge of when the scent is from. Proof that perception is reality has never been more clear.

    Just a thought: If a basenoter was told to smell Dunhill '30, Eau Sauvage, or 4711 (for instance), and not told the name or date of the fragrance, would they in any find them "old" smelling in any way at all? I think not. This is of course assuming the person had never experienced these scents. If Monsieur de Givenchy was repackaged and marketed as a 2006 Armani, I'm sure youngsters wouldn't hesitate to buy it.

    As a side topic, does anyone think that taste in cologne, like fashion, goes through cycles (ie, the "70's look" was in about a decade ago; now an 80's-ish style is coming back; recently, it's looking like a more vintage, old school, plaid sort of look was reintroduced)? I have not been around long enough, let also been into fragrance long enough to know about this.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    it's all relative and it really depends on who are you talking to: i have a friend who has a son (15yo ) that says that he wears a "young man's cologne": harry potter EDT, and that and "old man's scent" is curve wave for men and /or cool water game.
    go figure.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    In 25 years, Aqua Di Gio will be an old man's scent. 25 years ago, Azzaro PH was a young man's scent. I guess it's all perception.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus
    Now that you expressed yourself more clearly, I am postive, I fail to understand. I was not exactly born in Cologne, but our favorite family bottles of 4711 and Imperial (Guerlain), are clearly not in question for a man who is maybe in your father's generation. All members of a bigger family use these. In Europe/my environment, nobody worries a second about my wearing M. Balmain until I die. In fact, they may be glad, I smell like a lemon and not like a yoghurt in decay!

    In general, European males consider their colognes an unimportant 'by the way', something rather personal like their hair, cut or dyed, a joke at times, a 'tatoo for the nose', and neither a philosophy nor a serious code of behavior! That may be very different in other parts of the world as I am now inclined to believe. But it does not worry me, as long as a lot of decent stuff is still produced here in abundance.
    Well...they shouldn't worry about you wearing M. Balmain. Anyone should wear what he likes. I was just talking about the reason someone could associate a certain type of scent with a certain age. For most, a fresh scent it's suitable on a fresh (young) body, while a non-fresh scent it's suitable more on a non-fresh (not young) body. Why scents like L'Eau d'Issey, AdG, L'Eau par Kenzo, Cool Water, Chrome etc are in general regarded as young man type of scent, while scents like Antaeus, Heritage, Habit Rouge, Cristobal, Gucci PH, M7 etc are in general regarded as old man type of scent? Of course, it remains to be established what young man and old man mean. There are many young man who are old on the inside and old people who are just kids on the inside, so, if we speak about how appropriate it's a certain scent for someone, I think this has more to do with how old is a person on the inside and not so much with the age of the body, but, in most cases, others perceive only the age of the body of a certain person and not how young or old that person feels; a young man can feel very old and tired on the inside and so he may like to wear scents that are not regarded as very suitable for a young man, and an old man can feel very young and energetic on the inside and so he may like to wear scents that project this image.
    Last edited by Luca; 30th June 2006 at 08:00 AM.

  16. #16
    Explorator Dumpsterorum
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    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by Luca30
    .....because he's wearing a fresh scent which it's not very suitable for a decrepit body.
    Quote Originally Posted by Luca30
    .....they are old, they've been produced long time ago and are close to the expiration term.....
    Yes, it's always such a nuisance for me to have to stop and try to gather up those obnoxious tattered gauze windings dragging along behind me as I shuffle...



    Oh, and please don't use the word expiration around me again!

  17. #17

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent



    Are you old? When I'll be old, I won't mind if someone will tell me that I'm expired. It will be the true and I don't want someone to use all kinds of euphemisms when he will refer to my age....

  18. #18

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Charlie Chaplin was fathering children as an octogenarian and Goethe was laying the chicks, philosophers such as Isaiah Berlin or Gadamer had razor sharp intellects at 85 and bloody 100 years. And then there are senile, mentally wasted twenty-year olds. Sure old age has its physiological frustrations, but every age has its unique qualities as well. I do not ever want to be a stupid smelly pubescent 16 yr. old again and I'm sure I'll have ways of enjoying life at 70, if I make it - including dousing myself with Moinsieur Balmain and tangoing with my equally aged wife. "Expired" is definitely a post- and not a pre-mortem concept. Like the mummy.
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life
    "Expired" is definitely a post- and not a pre-mortem concept. Like the mummy.
    Expired it's a term used by manufacturers of different products, to designate the fact that the quality of a product it's no longer the one by which the product was meant for consumption.

    When I used the term expired in relation with old humans, I had in mind mainly the body, about which, if someone is sincere with himself, will admit that it's indeed expired, in the same way an apple could be expired; you could eat it, but I don't think that it will have a very pleasant taste or feel nice when you touch it.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Again this is relative. The majority of obese people in my country with the accompanying disastrously poor health are young. Under 40.
    Meanwhile I see old "cats" at my gym, 50 + with incredible physique.

    While I myself sometimes generalize, often to simplify our complex world temporarliy, this is IMHO very hard to do in this particular area. So many other factors play a role here, especially socio-cultural ones.

    Wear what makes you feel good, if you´re comfortable with it and have a decent self esteem no fragrance will be weird or age-inapropriate. Simple as that.

    MMM

  21. #21

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    If a young man is unhealthy and looks bad, thats probably because of his lifestyle (what he eats, his job, the way he takes care of his body).

    There are also exceptions around old people, people who look younger then they really are; this is also an efect of their lifestyle.

    But, in general, old people don't feel or look like young people; their bodys are not beautiful anymore (they are maybe for the persons who love them) and they have much more diseases than young people. All bodys, with the passing of time, disintegrate slowly, until they won't be able to perform their functions.The body of old people (or any other old body for that matter) doesn't listen to them like it did when they were young; with each day they become more and more separated from their body, until a final separation. So we can say that a body expires slowly.

    But I think the discussion deviated...
    Last edited by Luca; 30th June 2006 at 11:07 AM.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I never bought into the old man / young man issue.

    What is an old man? To an 18 year old, is it 30? To a 25 year old, is it 40? To a 30 year old, is it 50? To a 50 year old, is it 70.

    I would think that an 18 year old would consider a scent he/she associates with a 30 year old to be an old scent, where less than a decade before, the 30 year old who was in his early 20's thought that same scent was a young man's scent.

    I shop for fragrances in all the deaprtment stores in New York. Never once did I see an "old man" (again, how old is "old"?) not sample the modern scents, nor have I ever seen a sales associate not market the latest scents on "old" men.

    I think the more appropriate way to address this is not old/young but in style/not in style, meaning that young people of the past wore different scents than young people today and those older scents are now associated with the people who bought them in the past and are older.

    Honestly, I think that the only people who think about this are hobbiests and I really doubt that any one in the general public would even think to know the difference. The only exception I think would be if a person has memories of a person older than them wearing a particular scent, like Aramis or Old Spice.

    I'm glad I'm 52. I can wear the older scents and also the newer ones. I can wear Habit Rouge one day and Bulgari Aqua the next. Except for Old Spice, no one from the general public has ever commented on "age" concerning a fragrance.

    Forget this nonsense. It's only a topic invented by hobbiests like us who analyze everything.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeFromManhattan
    I never bought into the old man / young man issue.

    What is an old man? To an 18 year old, is it 30? To a 25 year old, is it 40? To a 30 year old, is it 50? To a 50 year old, is it 70.

    I would think that an 18 year old would consider a scent he/she associates with a 30 year old to be an old scent, where less than a decade before, the 30 year old who was in his early 20's thought that same scent was a young man's scent.

    I shop for fragrances in all the deaprtment stores in New York. Never once did I see an "old man" (again, how old is "old"?) not sample the modern scents, nor have I ever seen a sales associate not market the latest scents on "old" men.

    I think the more appropriate way to address this is not old/young but in style/not in style, meaning that young people of the past wore different scents than young people today and those older scents are now associated with the people who bought them in the past and are older.

    Honestly, I think that the only people who think about this are hobbiests and I really doubt that any one in the general public would even think to know the difference. The only exception I think would be if a person has memories of a person older than them wearing a particular scent, like Aramis or Old Spice.

    I'm glad I'm 52. I can wear the older scents and also the newer ones. I can wear Habit Rouge one day and Bulgari Aqua the next. Except for Old Spice, no one from the general public has ever commented on "age" concerning a fragrance.

    Forget this nonsense. It's only a topic invented by hobbiests like us who analyze everything.
    Excellent post. I agree 100%.
    I'm 35, btw.

    KO

  24. #24

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Well said, Mike!

  25. #25

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I've said it before...My dad who is 54 wears AdG...he loves it. (no accounting for taste, I have tried to force Guerlain and Creed and such on him) There is no such thing as a young man/old man frag. You're only as old as you feel...Hell, he's 54 but feels/acts like a 23 year old who is actually responsible...(a far too random thing in these days) Fragrances do not dictate age...I like somethings that my grandpap likes, and somethings that my younger brother likes...if it smells good, it smells good....These threads get under my skin. When did a fragrance tell you that you couldn't wear it cause you are too young/old....this is ridiculous...wear what YOU like and that's that.....

  26. #26

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Luca, I know you have points you are trying to make, but c'mon now... are you really trying to have Scentemental show up at your door and whoop your ass? Tell him he's old and he'll give you an "old fashioned" ass whooping. The point is, just like how both new and old scents can smell good, you just got your ass beat no matter how you look at it.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    ..... ehmm - "Old Spice" - wearing by higher rank soldiers in Saigon-HQ, also from lower ranks - and in the dschungel of Vietnam!
    "Charly" was happy about this well "fragrance track"!



    Is it now an "old man's frag"? Or is it a real classics of today!





    .
    My 10 July favorites

    George F. Trumper Wellington Cologne
    Riva L'Altra Follia di Aquarama "Light"
    4711 Acqua Colonia Vetyver & Bergamot
    Cartier Déclaration d'un soir
    Atkinsons The British Bouquet
    Etro Gomma
    Rancé 1795 - Collection Privée Eau de France
    Penhaligon's Endymion
    Pal Zileri - Collezione Privata Viaggio d'Africa
    Floris Elite

  28. #28

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Giraffe
    Luca, I know you have points you are trying to make, but c'mon now... are you really trying to have Scentemental show up at your door and whoop your ass? Tell him he's old and he'll give you an "old fashioned" ass whooping. The point is, just like how both new and old scents can smell good, you just got your ass beat no matter how you look at it.
    I don't have a point to make. It's just an opinion on why certain types of scent are regarded as suitable for a young man, and why other types are regarded as more suitable on an old man.

    I didn't say that older men can't wear light and fresh scents like L'Eau d'Issey, AdG, Chrome, Blue Label, Cool Water, Higher Energy and the like; or that young men shouldn't wear dark and heavy scents.

    I'm 23 year old and most scents that I like and wear are not light and fresh, even if someone would tell me that they are more suitable on older men. My father is the exact opposite: he doesn't like dark and heavy scents, but light and fresh.

    I was just trying to show why the majority of people thinks that light and fresh scents are more suitable on young men, and why dark and heavy scents are in general regarded as suitable more on an older man.

    When an older man wears a light and fresh scent, the scent just seem to have no relation with the wearers body and mind, because in general one cannot associate a light and fresh scent, a scent that projects an image of energy, vitality and naivete, with a decrepit body and a disillusioned mind.

    Regarding the dark and heavy scents, I think that these kind of scents are associated more with older men because, while the older man doesn't have the same energy and vitality as a young man has, it's supposed to be more mature on the inside, with a more profound thinking and deeper feelings; and thats the image a dark and heavy scent projects about its wearer.
    Last edited by Luca; 1st July 2006 at 03:06 PM.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I know this has degenerated into a whole age divide snipe war however.....
    As a gay man I constantly see how youth/body obsession is carried to a circus-like level of extreme. It's not good for anyone at all. The boxing in of peple by age bracket is extremely linear thinking and closes eole off from the tapestry of human experience which we should be experiencing and celebrating rather than circumscribing.
    I'm surprised though that no one has mentioned marketing in this discussion. I find that the scents that people mention as "young person scents" are those most widely marketed and flooded onto the market. Remember when ckone was "the" scent of youth? Think egoiste or paco at their time. I think it's more tied in to the way youth culture is manipulated as demographic marketing in general. It is in with all the other products that the supposed key demographic has shoved down its throat. Just the same as music, clothing or movies. It all smacks of inoffensive lowest common denominator logic. And I also don't think it's closely related to the actual frag. Cool Water which I find immensely bland and JPG which is widely controversial have occupied the same market position. Put Royal English Leather or Pour Monsieur into a sexy broad appeal re-branding and watch how quickly they become a fad for 20 yr olds.
    m

  30. #30

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by marczilla
    I know this has degenerated into a whole age divide snipe war however.....
    As a gay man I constantly see how youth/body obsession is carried to a circus-like level of extreme. It's not good for anyone at all. The boxing in of peple by age bracket is extremely linear thinking and closes eole off from the tapestry of human experience which we should be experiencing and celebrating rather than circumscribing.
    I'm surprised though that no one has mentioned marketing in this discussion. I find that the scents that people mention as "young person scents" are those most widely marketed and flooded onto the market. Remember when ckone was "the" scent of youth? Think egoiste or paco at their time. I think it's more tied in to the way youth culture is manipulated as demographic marketing in general. It is in with all the other products that the supposed key demographic has shoved down its throat. Just the same as music, clothing or movies. It all smacks of inoffensive lowest common denominator logic. And I also don't think it's closely related to the actual frag. Cool Water which I find immensely bland and JPG which is widely controversial have occupied the same market position. Put Royal English Leather or Pour Monsieur into a sexy broad appeal re-branding and watch how quickly they become a fad for 20 yr olds.
    m
    Eloquently put. I couldn't agree more.

  31. #31

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I'll 2nd the kudos to this quote:


    Quote Originally Posted by marczilla
    I know this has degenerated into a whole age divide snipe war however.....
    As a gay man I constantly see how youth/body obsession is carried to a circus-like level of extreme. It's not good for anyone at all. The boxing in of peple by age bracket is extremely linear thinking and closes eole off from the tapestry of human experience which we should be experiencing and celebrating rather than circumscribing.
    I'm surprised though that no one has mentioned marketing in this discussion. I find that the scents that people mention as "young person scents" are those most widely marketed and flooded onto the market. Remember when ckone was "the" scent of youth? Think egoiste or paco at their time. I think it's more tied in to the way youth culture is manipulated as demographic marketing in general. It is in with all the other products that the supposed key demographic has shoved down its throat. Just the same as music, clothing or movies. It all smacks of inoffensive lowest common denominator logic. And I also don't think it's closely related to the actual frag. Cool Water which I find immensely bland and JPG which is widely controversial have occupied the same market position. Put Royal English Leather or Pour Monsieur into a sexy broad appeal re-branding and watch how quickly they become a fad for 20 yr olds.
    m
    Well said.


    Speaking within the 'box' of this weeks tabloids, I cant see much difference between a 20 something frumpy overweight person trying to pour themselves into a pair of skintight jeans, and an older gentleman of squared away appearance wearing this weeks new bubblegum fragrance.
    If it makes them happy, great. In either of these instances, I wouldnt expect many points on the fashion runway (which is what threads like these seem to emulate, if not by intention)

    It appears that our cultures youth is scared senseless of the natural progression of age, with good reason. They too (if they live long enough) will one day be subject to the same opinions of those younger than themselves. The opinions of a youth obsessed culture. Scentemental was right on in the other thread that touched on these things. Aging doesnt need to be the dirty, stinky affair that some of the posts here would like to indicate. There are numerous examples to the contrary.

    I note with disturbing consistency the increasing division of the age groups here at basenotes. Comparable to a nice coffee shop where all ages could meet, drink coffee together and talk. Then something happens, its hard to define but its right along with whats happening here. I go back to that same coffee shop a few years later and its a high school hangout.

    been fun.

  32. #32

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    45 years old here :-)

    My taste in fragrances is never dictated by any age factors. I like such a broad spectrum of them, from old classics like Guerlain Vetiver through to new releases like my current fave Terre d'Hermès.

  33. #33

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Back when I was a lurker on this board, a very knowledgeable gent who sadly doesn't post here anymore (I believe he went by the moniker Opalsdad) commented after sampling some of the fresh/aquatics that while he liked some of them, he wouldn't consider wearing any of them, because it would be like "mutton served as lamb." A wonderfully evocative phrase, and one that I personally can relate to. But let's make a deal: stop referring to certain fragrances as "old man" scents (how about the more respectful "mature") and we won't tag some of the more popular scents worn by the younger set as "unsophisticated", "common" or some similar pejorative label. In short, we can discuss that some scents may tend to appeal more to a certain age group, but let's do so in a gentlemanly and respectful manner. Because if we can manage to keep it respectful, we can have an interesting and involved conversation that won't lead to hurt feelings and angry outbursts, and perhaps we might even get a little closer to understanding the topic at hand, which I think was the reason the discussion was initiated.

    So, to continue the discussion, let me ask a question: most of us categorize scents to some extent as better for formal/office/dress-up versus those that are better for clubbing/informal/casual. Does some of this categorizing correlate to your perception of the age appropriateness of a fragrance? Why or why not? Give examples.

  34. #34

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    Just what we old folks need, again, another thread in which the privileged young can trot out all their prejudices and cant and tell us how imperfect we are and how miserable our lives now that we're no longer young and have so few fragrances available at our disposal. Got to follow the rules folks and the rules say that only young people can enjoy the fresh stuff, and remember folks if you wear the fresh stuff, the young people will think you want to be like them, because as we old people know, we really want to be like the young people right because they live such rich full lives and we, after the decrepitude of turning sixty, slowly crawl to oblivion smelling of dark and heavy scents. Give me a break! Do you really believe these caricatures? You might; I certainly don't.

    You people are really making your mark in the Basenotes pantheon of serious posters. I urge everyone to check out the posts of those people interested in these kinds of ridiculous questions, and you will clearly see that the common denominator to the sum of all their posts is that they add very little to the sum of knowledge on this board and have nothing original to say. This is why they start such sterile, inflammatory topics such as these.

    I have learned nothing about fragrances in this post, but a lot about the posters. I find talk of the "decrepit bodies" of 60 year olds, talk of "lack of energy and vitality," and talk of old people being compared to expired perishables dehumanizing and deeply offensive.

    I would again urge the moderators to examine whether there is one iota of value in anything said in this post that relates to fragrances. At the very least, this post belongs in the Off Topics section, where people can trot out their narrowmindedness and cramped souls with somewhat more immunity. Personally, however, I don't think it belongs anywhere on this forum.

    For all those intelligent, openminded, worldly posters
    who engage these offensive posters--with a clearly vast range of lived experience and broadened perspectives, not to mention a sense of irony--I simply say STOP and DON'T. These kinds of posts will eventually shrivel up like their cramped little souls and their circular, provincial-minded logic. The reason I don't engage these posters except at the general level is because I don't respect these people. If I did, they would be the kind of people that make Basenotes an interesting and informative place through a sharing of knowledge and experience about fragrances, and they're not, and, of course, they wouldn't be posting about and on such irrelevant topics if they were.

    I am stating clearly for the record so the moderators can see and take note that I am deeply offend by the nature and comments in this thread.

    For those of you who feel the same way, I suggest you register your feelings the same way I just have.

    I commend Adrian, whom I very harshly and mistakenly upbraided in a previous post on this same offensive topic for his concise and thoughtful statement after which all this absurdity should have ceased and this post should have sunk into the depths of Basenotes oblivion where it belongs.

    scentemental

    P.S. I find the casual, carefree nature with which this thread was started particularly offensive as if asking the question in such a flippant and open manner justified it.


    Last edited by scentemental; 2nd July 2006 at 06:34 AM.

  35. #35

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    I agree with Scentemental.
    I'm 35 yrs. old and look much younger, but also find the nature of some comments here very crass, inflammatory, and obviously... simple-minded and immature.

    KO
    Last edited by knightowl; 2nd July 2006 at 06:53 AM.

  36. #36

    Default Re: Young Man/Old Man Scent

    This thread needs to stop, period.

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