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  1. #1

    Default Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    I recently picked up Heritage EDP from the Geurlain shop at 68 Champs in paris, so last night I did a wrist to wrist with the EDT.

    These are my initial impressions;
    The EDT seems to have a bigger citrus and volatile top note rush, where the EDP kicks in with immediate woods. Both have a light lavender note lurking behind the foreground.

    As they move into the middle the sheer smoothness of the EDP is striking as the high quality oakmoss creeps in underscored by the vanilla and dry wood wheras the EDT seems to veer off into a more floral direction as the guerlainade comes to prominance here. I love this accord, it is quite similar to the middle of habit rouge and is also evident in the EDP but a little later on and a little more subdued.

    The EDT then stays with this accord which sinks slowly into vanilla and wood while the EDP remains strikingly smooth with a prominent oakmoss and wood with a little spice and less vanilla.

    Interestingly they seem to have similar longevity and projection to me.

    Any thoughts anyone?

    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 4th October 2006 at 10:15 AM.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

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  2. #2
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Thanks for the informative review hirch_duckfinder (love that name btw). I could use some time in Paris. Heritage is a substantial fragrance. I haven't tried the EDP. Does the EDP box list oakmoss as an ingredient?

  3. #3

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by pluran
    Thanks for the informative review hirch_duckfinder (love that name btw). I could use some time in Paris. Heritage is a substantial fragrance. I haven't tried the EDP. Does the EDP box list oakmoss as an ingredient?
    I could use some more time there too - so much to explore. It says "tree moss". I assume it is oak
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

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  4. #4

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder
    I could use some more time there too - so much to explore. It says "tree moss". I assume it is oak

    There are differences between Oakmoss and tree moss:

    Oakmoss, Evernia prunastri, is a lichen and one of the most commonly used fixatives in both women's and men's fragrances. Lichen is a category of fungi that live in a symbiotic relationship with hard porous surfaces like trees trunks, branches, etc. and rocks. Sometimes lichens can also co-exist with certain forms of algae.


    Tree Mosses, Evernia furfuracea and Usnea barbata, are also lichen, and are also used quite often in perfumery, but more so in men's fragrances. These are found growing on pine trees or spruce trees and are sometimes misleadingly called oakmoss, when in reality they should be called tree moss or fir moss. The reason they're mislabelled or misrepresented is because sometimes they are substituted as cheaper, inferior alternatives to true oakmoss, which grows only on oak trees, particularly the Quercus robur species of oak. Tree mosses tend not to have the animalic leather undertone of oakmoss, but basically work the same way as a fixative to slow down the rate of evaporation of lighter more transient notes while providing a less complex aromatic profile than oakmoss.

    scentemental


    Last edited by scentemental; 4th October 2006 at 08:04 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental
    hirch_duckfinder,

    Oakmoss and tree moss are two different things:


    Oakmoss, Evernia prunastri, is a lichen and one of the most commonly used fixatives in both women's and men's fragrances. Lichen is a category of fungi that live in a symbiotic relationship with hard porous surfaces like trees trunks, branches, etc. and rocks. Sometimes lichens can also co-exist with certain forms of algae.


    Tree Mosses, Evernia furfuracea and Usnea barbata are also used quite often in perfumery, but more so in men's fragrances. These are found growing on pine trees or spruce trees and are sometimes misleadingly called oakmoss, when in reality they should be called tree moss or fir moss. The reason they're mislabelled or misrepresented is because sometimes they are substituted as cheaper, inferior alternatives to true oakmoss, which grows only on oak trees, particularly the Quercus robur species of oak. Tree mosses tend not to have the persistent heavy animalic profile of oakmoss, but basically work the same way as a fixative to slow down the rate of evaporation of lighter more transient notes.

    scentemental


    Thanks for that! It is Evernia Furfuracea which is listed on the box. I never knew there was a distinction. I was just aware of a mossy smell, quite smooth, not heavy and animalic. Do you have any thoughts on heritage edp v edt scentemental?
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

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  6. #6

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder
    Thanks for that! It is Evernia Furfuracea which is listed on the box. I never knew there was a distinction. I was just aware of a mossy smell, quite smooth, not heavy and animalic. Do you have any thoughts on heritage edp v edt scentemental?
    I should qualify my previous, clumisly phrased statement somewhat with regard to oakmoss and its animalic note: Oakmoss does not have a heavy animalic note per se, but in absolute form, it has quite a complex scent profile part of which is a persistent leather-like undertone. Oakmoss can and frequently does deepen and complicate the animalic component of fragrances it's added to by the persistence of this leather-like undertone from the top notes through to the drydown, and, of course, how prominent such an undertone is depends on how much the use of oakmoss absolute is diluted within any particular fragrance. This leather-like undertone is not part of the scent profile of tree moss.

    With regard to your question about the differences between Héritage EDT and Héritage EDP.

    Sometimes in the reformulation of the EDP version of a fragrance, the perfumer will down play the diffusivity of the original EDT fragrance and this is why sometimes EDPs don't always smell stronger initially than the EDTs. This is particularly the case with Guerlain's Héritage EDP. The patchouli, pepper, coriander combination in Héritage EDT gives it a very initial in-your-face
    spikey, somewhat prickly quality. In the EDP version the patchouli, pepper, coriander combination is toned down and integrated more fully with the other element of the fragrance so that the initial impact of the EDP isn't as in your face as the EDT's. Despite the fact that the EDP is stronger in terms of percentage of perfume oils, the EDP doesn't seem, at least initially, to be stronger. It's mellower, smoother, quietly richer. That's a direct result of the patchouli, pepper, coriander's initial diffusivity making less of an impact. If you do a side-by-side test, however, you will see that the duration of the EDP, its steady output, is definitely what, over time, distinguishes it from the EDT and, in my opinion, makes it superior. The famed Guerlinade basenotes seem to be somewhat more present earlier in the drydown of the EDP and this is what also adds to the more refined richer feel the EDP has over the EDT.

    I hope this helps.

    scentemental

    Last edited by scentemental; 4th October 2006 at 08:10 PM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental
    I should qualify my previous, clumisly phrased statement somewhat with regard to oakmoss and its animalic note: Oakmoss does not have a heavy animalic note per se, but in absolute form, it has quite a complex scent profile part of which is a persistent leather-like undertone. Oakmoss can and frequently does deepen and complicate the animalic component of fragrances it's added to by the persistence of this leather-like undertone from the top notes through to the drydown, and, of course, how prominent such an undertone is depends on how much the use of oakmoss absolute is diluted within any particular fragrance. This leather-like undertone is not part of the scent profile of tree moss.

    With regard to your question about the differences between Héritage EDT and Héritage EDP.

    Sometimes in the reformulation of the EDP version of a fragrance, the perfumer will down play the diffusivity of the original EDT fragrance and this is why sometimes EDPs don't always smell stronger initially than the EDTs. This is particularly the case with Guerlain's Héritage EDP. The patchouli, pepper, coriander combination in Héritage EDT gives it a very initial in-your-face quality. It's spiky and somewhat prickly. In the EDP version the patchouli, pepper, coriander combination is toned down and integrated more fully so that the initial impact of the EDP isn't as in your face as the EDT. Despite the fact that the EDP is stronger in terms of percentage of perfume oils, the EDP doesn't seem, at least initially, to be stronger. It's mellower, smooth, quietly richer. That's a direct result of the patchouli, pepper, coriander's initial diffusivity making less of an impact. If you do a side-by-side test, however, you will see that the duration of the EDP, its steady output, is definitely what, over time, distinguishes it from the EDT and, in my opinion, makes it superior. The famed Guerlinade basenotes seem to be somewhat more present earlier in the drydown of the EDP and this also adds to the more refined richer feel that the EDP has.

    I hope this helps.

    scentemental

    Yes. Thanks. I'll redo my test with those thoughts in mind.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  8. #8

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Anyone know where to find the EDP version of Heritage in the States? Would love to have a bottle if it's not too terribly expensive.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    i could slap myself silly for not discovering my fondness for heritage edt before i was in paris ...all along it was sitting here...yet at the time i didnt give it more appreciation...then i went to paris...and sought out at what was at the time those things i was interested in...came back with lots of stuff and the necessary justification with my wife was required but i got what i wanted... i was at guerlain...the last stop on my travels...and although "everything" was there <except my budget...which was gone...oh why was it the last stop... > it wasnt until i came home that i realized how profound the heritage was for me and how close i was to the source for getting the edp...which i only became aware of after expressing my thoughts here....

    i looked for the heritage edp here and received a reply from scentemental...then a decant...and i wont wax poetic about my revelations...but i will say i am so thankful for receiving this...although i am jealously guarding this decant until i am able to purchase a bottle....the significance of being able to compare the edt and edp from an enthusiastic vantage point has been tremendous in my experiences with fragrance thus far....

    having recently some means towards exploring the realm of fragrance niche/designer/natural/synthetic/etc....i must say this forum is a complete delight and although i definetly "listen" to many voices here and am delighted each time...i'm reminded of an interviewer asking Nick Lowe about his recent album and he replied "its round and black with a hole in the center"....lol
    all the best
    sobranie

  10. #10
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    ...
    Last edited by pluran; 28th January 2007 at 01:15 AM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    bump

  12. #12

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    I intended to respond to this thread, but then I saw pluran's current avatar and completely lost my train of thought.

    I'll be back after I recover.
    Last edited by TwoRoads; 5th December 2007 at 10:58 PM.
    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and sorry I could not travel both and be one traveler, long I stood and looked down one as far as I could to where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, ...... I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. - Robert Frost

  13. #13

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Yeah, I've read all this before and hence the more was surprised why the EDP's drydown doesn't seem smoother, richer..than the EDT's - again, to my nose. I agree on the sillage difference (EDT having more sillage, EDP wears closer to the skin), yes, the top notes of EDT can seem a bit odd/sharp first compared to EDP. Btw, I also get the civet-like note/element in the EDP which tvlampboy mentioned in another thread once. Also agree that the EDP perhaps lasts longer than the EDT although EDT last good 8 hours on me. What I lack in EDP is the creaminess/fullness of the EDT's drydown or at least the creaminess in EDT is more pronounced than in the EDP and that's why I find EDT's drydown fuller and more fluid than the EDP's. Don't know what note (I don't think it's vanilla) or combination of notes makes the creaminess more pronounced in EDT for me, perhaps scentemental could explain better.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Just wondering, does the Bois du Portugal resemblance that people talk about with this fragrance apply to the EDT version, the EDP version, or both? Thanks.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    I can't see much resemblance with BdP (and reformulated Heritage EdT).

  16. #16

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Since this old thread has been bumped, I just wanted to weigh in on something a little bit removed and maybe only slightly relevant... I have Heritage EDT and EDP (vintage edt and modern EDP)-- they're quite different and I think I reviewed their contrasts before.

    The thing that provoked me to chime in here is that I'm wondering how reformulations could impact their differences. Is it fair for me to compare the vintage EDT to the reformulated EDP? I just recently got the reformulated Habit Rouge EDT and in comparing it to the vintage EDT, there is a huge difference. I initially liked the reformulation better, but now I'm not so sure-- the reformulation has an air of modern, hedione-heavy girly perfume to it. It's like the vintage is a deep red velvet sofa with a lushness to it; the reformulation is the same sofa but with one of those clear plastic furniture guard covers-- and it won't come off! Kind of a very dense blast of white musk as well-- and I get this same feeling with the modern version of Heritage EDP, whereas I get none of it in the vintage EDT.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    Quote Originally Posted by Indie_Guy View Post
    Since this old thread has been bumped, I just wanted to weigh in on something a little bit removed and maybe only slightly relevant... I have Heritage EDT and EDP (vintage edt and modern EDP)-- they're quite different and I think I reviewed their contrasts before.

    The thing that provoked me to chime in here is that I'm wondering how reformulations could impact their differences. Is it fair for me to compare the vintage EDT to the reformulated EDP? ...
    IMO, if you're comparing vintage EdT to 'new' EdP, there's going to be some sort of disconnect because to me, the vintage EdP shares much more of that wonderful softness that vintage Heritage has - just a lot fuller and deeper in the vintage EdP.

    'New' Heritage (both versions) gives me a headache.
    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple"

    -- Jack Kerouac

  18. #18

    Default Re: Heritage EDP v EDT reviews

    The vintage EDP has a much more pronounced civet note in it than any of the other Heritage incarnations I've tried. I really love it. I actually like the new EDT and EDP as well, but they aren't nearly as animalic as the older EDP.

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