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  1. #1

    Default Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    I've been reading reviews a while, trying to find new things I'd like. For years, I've worn Fahrenheit exclusively and I love it, but I want a bit of variation. I used to get Eau Sauvage as a present but it bored me.

    Now for the questions

    1) I generally don't like floral scents, I think they're too sweet. I like the scent of roses but don't want to smell it on people. I find that smells of flowers from dry-climate bushes, the desert even, are far more appealing to me. Is there a name for that type of scent? Any EDTs that smell like that?

    2) In reviews, notes are used that I can't distinguish. How does one learn to decompose scents? Are you just born with a good nose, is it experience with different EDTs, researching their notes and learning by association? Or is it possible to get pure sandalwood, vetiver, cedarwod etc. in isolation?

    3) I've explored a bit by reading reviews from people who said good things of Fahrenheit. Very happy with the discovery of Zino, Santos Concentrée, Van Cleef (thanks foetidus, I love your reviews). The only disappointment so far has been Lolita Lempicka. Too sweet for me. By the way, I find Santos sweet and even gourmandy, far more "friendly" than Fahrenheit, still my favorite. I was expecting something almost intimidating.
    Any recommendations of something at once invigorating and a bit dark?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by jaimes; 22nd October 2006 at 05:07 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    Hi, and welcome to basenotes!

    1. I can't answer this because I am not a fan of florals. I enjoy a rose note incorperated with certain scents but that is about the extent to what I care for in the floral world.

    2. There are kits you can get. I'm pretty sure you can get pure oils of single notes to compare certain confusing notes. I just use what I have smelled to figure it out. I've smelled so many and have read so many scent pyramids. I just figure it out eventually. There are many notes that I don't pick up on or overlook but I'm getting better with time. It's very difficult. Some people here can't even figure out many common notes because of poor olfactory senses. It's semi luck and lots of practice.

    3. No idea what you might be looking for. LL seems like something you'd like but if you don't then I'm not sure I can offer suggestions.

    Welcome, once again...

  3. #3

    Default Re: Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaimes
    I've been reading reviews a while, trying to find new things I'd like. For years, I've worn Fahrenheit exclusively and I love it, but I want a bit of variation. I used to get Eau Sauvage as a present but it bored me.

    Now for the questions

    1) I generally don't like floral scents, I think they're too sweet. I like the scent of roses but don't want to smell it on people. I find that smells of flowers from dry-climate bushes, the desert even, are far more appealing to me. Is there a name for that type of scent? Any EDTs that smell like that?

    2) In reviews, notes are used that I can't distinguish. How does one learn to decompose scents? Are you just born with a good nose, is it experience with different EDTs, researching their notes and learning by association? Or is it possible to get pure sandalwood, vetiver, cedarwod etc. in isolation?

    3) I've explored a bit by reading reviews from people who said good things of Fahrenheit. Very happy with the discovery of Zino, Santos Concentrée, Van Cleef (thanks foetidus, I love your reviews). The only disappointment so far has been Lolita Lempicka. Too sweet for me. By the way, I find Santos sweet and even gourmandy, far more "friendly" than Fahrenheit, still my favorite. I was expecting something almost intimidating.
    Any recommendations of something at once invigorating and a bit dark?

    Thanks!
    Welcome to Basenotes, jaimes.

    Thanks for the compliment. You've brought up an awful lot of ideas and I won't be able to address them all in one writing, but I'll try... I'll have to think awhile about dry florals because I'm not really a fan of most florals and I tend not to keep them in mind. Also there are some flowers that I tend to accept easily--jasmine, geranium, violet--and others I have a difficult time with in fragrances--tuberose and rose.

    I find the word "sweet" the most conflicting word in the fragrance vocabulary. To my mind you are right to call Lolita Lempicka sweet. When I use "sweet" that's about what I mean--sugary, like honey, or in many cases, tonka. I notice others call vanilla or almond "sweet." I don't consider them sweet except in combination with other notes. I call them by their names and don't lump them in any group. The "sweetness" you smell in Santos Concentree I would call "sharp green." "Green" is plant based, but it's not floral to my nose. I have to make a disclaimer, here --I don't think I have the copyright on those descriptions so they aren't sacred--and there are other reviewers here with better noses than mine (several men and most of the women who write reviews, actually, but then we all are "right" according to our own noses). Incidently, if that "sharpness" in a fragrance gets too strong and undistinguished and is then mixed with florals or vanilla or the like, I call it "perfumy." But your mentioning the Santos thing is really good --it helps me to understand where you are coming from.

    Time is short now and I have to get to work, but let me recommend, off the cuff, two of the--what I would call "driest" fragrances (not floral or almondy or sweet at all) I know and love: Sud Est by Romeo Gigli --discontinued but still available rather inexpensively although getting rarer--and Diptyque's L'Eau Trois. You might also try Yatagan by Caron but I dislike it immensly because I can no longer handle the castoreum in it. As for Fahrenheit, I love it and don't know of anything in its category. Try Grey Flannel, on the off chance that you can handle the violet. It's very inexpensive.
    Sorry to cut this short, but I have to get to work now...Good Luck!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    Thanks EnviYus and foetidus for your welcome and replies.

    I decided to experiment with scents two weeks ago, and there's a lot I need to learn and try before I can properly formulate what I mean. It will be interesting.

    The flowers and bushes I'm thinking of are not "floral" in the sense of violets and roses. They contain a lot of resin and don't smell sweet. They probably make more sense as "green" then, but drier. When I head to Spain this spring or summer I'll try to get the names and translate them.

    I want to try different houses and classes to start acquiring vocabulary. I'm going to try M7, I'll get samples of L'Eau Trois and L'Eau Lente, and I'll look up Sud Est. By the way, I was very intrigued by DK Men, which you seem to like a lot, foetidus, as I love the smell of gasoline. Shame it's discontinued.

    I used "sweet" for both LL and Santos, I'm realising. Definitely not the same thing, but when I wear Santos and smell my wrist, I just want to smell closer and take a bite. I love it, and it stays on me forever. In no way floral, I agree.

    It's interesting that scent can be so defining of a person. I'm taking my first steps here, but I feel that "Fahrenheit over Eau Sauvage" is as good a characterization of me as "Radiohead over Coldplay" or "Magic Johnson over Michael Jordan". I guess that's what so many addicts are doing, trying to map themselves.

    Thanks again!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    Quote Originally Posted by jaimes
    ...They contain a lot of resin and don't smell sweet. They probably make more sense as "green" then, but drier. When I head to Spain this spring or summer I'll try to get the names and translate them.

    ...By the way, I was very intrigued by DK Men, which you seem to like a lot, foetidus, as I love the smell of gasoline. Shame it's discontinued...

    ...when I wear Santos and smell my wrist, I just want to smell closer and take a bite. I love it, and it stays on me forever. ...

    It's interesting that scent can be so defining of a person....
    Thanks again!
    Resinous--ok. There's L'Artisan's Timbuktu--begins a little sweet and fruity but dries down very dry. A L'Artisan less dry than Timbuktu and several reviewers got "sweet" out of it, but I didn't is Fou d'Absinthe. Not exactly resinous but worth a try is Fredric Malle's Vetiver Extraordinaire which is a dry, almost bitter take on vetiver. If you want a lot of incense with your resin try Comme des Garcons' Zagorsk which is a fantastically resinous incense fragrance. Then in CdG's Series 1 there is Tea which I dislike but it has a strong tar note in it.

    Since you are from Spain, how do you feel about Sybaris? I find this one of the darkest of the 80's classics--it's a favorite of mine.

    Yes it's not good that so many of these fragrances are discontinued. Something a little similar to DK Men in its drydown--not its top notes is Nemo by Cacharel; it has been discontinued more recently than DK Men and it has a sweet opening rather than the gasoline opening of DK Men, but the dry downs are quite similar.

    Scents can define a person--that's a good way of putting it. I guess I'm a "DK Man over a CK One" kind of guy--I like that!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Dry climate flowers. Vocabulary?

    Great recommendations. I just received a box with samples. L'Eau Trois is definitely a dry one! I prefer Eau Lente. Sud Est will be arriving soon. Also tried M7 and liked it, though if I over-applied it, I would feel like an impostor. I can tell this little new hobby is going to consume a lot time and money.

    I have very little experience with Spanish fragrances. My father switched to Agua Brava after a lifetime of lavenders from English houses, and that's about it. Sybaris has a promising name, I'll check it out when I'm home for Christmas.

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