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  1. #1
    Thrax
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    Default Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Why is it that when a cheap brand makes a scent that is similar to something made by an expensive brand, it's a "copy"? And when a expensive brand makes a scent that is similar to something a cheap brand made, they "re-worked it"?

    Also, why is it that when a cheap brand makes a scent that is identical to another cheap brand's scent, they are just "similar"?

    Isnt it a bit unfair to say that a cheaper brand "copied" or "ripped off" a expensive brands scent just because they made something that happens to be similar to it?

  2. #2
    DustB's Avatar
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Just a quick answer why those things are true: because.

    But I don't think they're true. I think all those words are applied equally to cheap, expensive, or even middle range scents. I've seen the expensive brands accused of ripping off scents plenty. I think all those words can be or are synonyms for each other and which scent a person prefers probably dictates which other ones get that person's pajorative words. I could rather ask you: why do you think copied and ripped off and reworked are only applied in the ways you suggest? I think it suggests how YOU think the relationship between expensive and inexpensive brands comes out.

    But, as if this is only a quick question that you need someone to answer, and as if there is a quick answer easy to relate, my anwer is my first one. The answer is because.
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  3. #3
    Thrax
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by DustB
    But, as if this is only a quick question that you need someone to answer, and as if there is a quick answer easy to relate, my anwer is my first one. The answer is because.
    LOL! Because. Thats easy to accept! Perhaps it's one of those mysteries of the universe.....it just happens.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Well, anything to do with designer fashion companies or companies producing luxury goods carries with it very elitest notions.

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Old Navy, they're cheap and of average quality, anyone wearing them wouldn't be labled "fashionable"

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Armani, people think that they're top of the line, amazing quality, and whoever is wearing them is "fashionable".

    The Old Navy jeans sewed by some poverty stricken woman earning pennies a day in Bangledesh.

    The Armani jeans were produced in Italy.

    The only actual difference is perhaps a slight difference in quality and the name branded upon the pants.

    However, Armani's name alone justifies a 1000% markup or more over the Old Navy jeans.


    There are millions of people so shallow that anything that carries a name that has this mystical reputation and can be associated with their favourite movie stars is obviously many times better.

    Same thing with fragrances. If a cheap brand makes something which is actually really good, it's still a cheap cologne. If Armani releases some boring, garbage cologne (think City Glam for men) to the average person it's still an "awesome, high quality fragrance!"

    It's all just fancy brand elitism. People dismiss cheap things and don't give them any credit. If something's expensive then it must be good.

    Haha I'll get flamed for this, but to me I think of Cool Water vs. Green Irish Tweed. If I wear Cool Water, I'm unoriginal, just copying everyone else wearing a crappy cologne that was ripped off from something else. But if I wear Green Irish Tweed, I've got impeccable taste!

    Bottom line, we give things credit based upon their price in a lot of cases. The designer fashion industry doesn't make billions of dollars and get to charge 15X more for their products than average companies because of the quality. It's a social statement.

  5. #5
    zztopp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Its about time that the fragrance industry implement patent protection for fragrance formulas.
    -

  6. #6
    Thrax
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by acehimself
    Well, anything to do with designer fashion companies or companies producing luxury goods carries with it very elitest notions.

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Old Navy, they're cheap and of average quality, anyone wearing them wouldn't be labled "fashionable"

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Armani, people think that they're top of the line, amazing quality, and whoever is wearing them is "fashionable".

    The Old Navy jeans sewed by some poverty stricken woman earning pennies a day in Bangledesh.

    The Armani jeans were produced in Italy.

    The only actual difference is perhaps a slight difference in quality and the name branded upon the pants.

    However, Armani's name alone justifies a 1000% markup or more over the Old Navy jeans.


    There are millions of people so shallow that anything that carries a name that has this mystical reputation and can be associated with their favourite movie stars is obviously many times better.

    Same thing with fragrances. If a cheap brand makes something which is actually really good, it's still a cheap cologne. If Armani releases some boring, garbage cologne (think City Glam for men) to the average person it's still an "awesome, high quality fragrance!"

    It's all just fancy brand elitism. People dismiss cheap things and don't give them any credit. If something's expensive then it must be good.

    Haha I'll get flamed for this, but to me I think of Cool Water vs. Green Irish Tweed. If I wear Cool Water, I'm unoriginal, just copying everyone else wearing a crappy cologne that was ripped off from something else. But if I wear Green Irish Tweed, I've got impeccable taste!

    Bottom line, we give things credit based upon their price in a lot of cases. The designer fashion industry doesn't make billions of dollars and get to charge 15X more for their products than average companies because of the quality. It's a social statement.
    Great post here. You gave exactley the answer I was looking hoping to get.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    ask luca turin

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by acehimself
    Well, anything to do with designer fashion companies or companies producing luxury goods carries with it very elitest notions.

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Old Navy, they're cheap and of average quality, anyone wearing them wouldn't be labled "fashionable"

    If I buy a pair of jeans from Armani, people think that they're top of the line, amazing quality, and whoever is wearing them is "fashionable".

    The Old Navy jeans sewed by some poverty stricken woman earning pennies a day in Bangledesh.

    The Armani jeans were produced in Italy.

    The only actual difference is perhaps a slight difference in quality and the name branded upon the pants.

    However, Armani's name alone justifies a 1000% markup or more over the Old Navy jeans.


    There are millions of people so shallow that anything that carries a name that has this mystical reputation and can be associated with their favourite movie stars is obviously many times better.

    Same thing with fragrances. If a cheap brand makes something which is actually really good, it's still a cheap cologne. If Armani releases some boring, garbage cologne (think City Glam for men) to the average person it's still an "awesome, high quality fragrance!"

    It's all just fancy brand elitism. People dismiss cheap things and don't give them any credit. If something's expensive then it must be good.

    Haha I'll get flamed for this, but to me I think of Cool Water vs. Green Irish Tweed. If I wear Cool Water, I'm unoriginal, just copying everyone else wearing a crappy cologne that was ripped off from something else. But if I wear Green Irish Tweed, I've got impeccable taste!

    Bottom line, we give things credit based upon their price in a lot of cases. The designer fashion industry doesn't make billions of dollars and get to charge 15X more for their products than average companies because of the quality. It's a social statement.
    quite right, BUT: there's also the case where company x invests a lot of time and money in designing a scent, a car, a household appliance, an electric shaver and then some company y rips off cheaper copies, cheaper because they are often of inferior quality plus have a much higher profit margin due to saving all those research & development costs. Ask the Chinese.
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  9. #9
    zztopp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life
    quite right, BUT: there's also the case where company x invests a lot of time and money in designing a scent, a car, a household appliance, an electric shaver and then some company y rips off cheaper copies, cheaper because they are often of inferior quality plus have a much higher profit margin due to saving all those research & development costs. Ask the Chinese.
    Or ask the drug companies like Pfizer who have to compete with generics after their patents expire.
    -

  10. #10

    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life
    quite right, BUT: there's also the case where company x invests a lot of time and money in designing a scent, a car, a household appliance, an electric shaver and then some company y rips off cheaper copies, cheaper because they are often of inferior quality plus have a much higher profit margin due to saving all those research & development costs. Ask the Chinese.
    Well, that's the thing about international trade. Patents in country X don't necessarily apply in country Y. There are laws around this. If a company has a patent on a certain product and an international manufacturer rips it off completely they won't legally be able to sell it in that market. It really varies though, patent law gets terribly complex.

    As for having patent protection on fragrances? I think that would be impossible. Unless you go by an exact formula, there's nothing to stop another company from just changing around a few little things to circumvent such a rule. And due to the subjective nature of something like a fragrance's scent, it's impossible to create some sort of objective policy regarding "similarities" outside of actual ingredients.

    The pharmaceutical industry is different. The sole major point of drug patent periods is to maintain an incentive for companies to invest large sums of money into R&D, that's it.

  11. #11
    zztopp's Avatar
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    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by acehimself
    The pharmaceutical industry is different. The sole major point of drug patent periods is to maintain an incentive for companies to invest large sums of money into R&D, that's it.
    With a rise in use of complex synthetic molecules in the fragrance industry, it looks like patents arent far away. The *patented* Calone(R) synthetic molecule created by Pfizer and responsible for the "aquatic/marine" smell in many fragrances is just one example (this was in the late 60s).
    -

  12. #12

    Default Re: Just a quick question that I need someone to answer.

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp
    With a rise in use of complex synthetic molecules in the fragrance industry, it looks like patents arent far away. The *patented* Calone(R) synthetic molecule created by Pfizer and responsible for the "aquatic/marine" smell in many fragrances is just one example (this was in the late 60s).
    Well yeah, obviously if a fragrance company is using a specifically patented ingredient in it's product others can't just rip it off.

    However, simply producing a fragrance that is designed to closely copy the general scent of another one without using the exact same formula isn't something that I can see being regulated.

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