Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Note Glossary

  1. #1

    Default Note Glossary

    Is a large part of the attraction to fragrances trying to identify the note? (as a matter of opinion), or is there a more scientific (for lack of a better term) way to understand what you are smelling.

    Does a list of notes and what they are derived from available?, or is creating new notes by combining primary notes the whole idea of the creative process. (ie.yellow and blue makes green)

    I'd like to see some type of comprehensive chart where (for example) Neroli, Brazilian Rosewood, Sandalwood,Tonka etc. are listed and their associated notes identified.

    If this list doesn't exist, is there a better place than here to compile one? I understand it would be quite a time consuming task, but there isn't a deadline on completion...maybe it can never be completed! I'm thinking along the lines of Wikipedia type format.

    What's your opinion?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    In one of Luca Turin's blog posts, he discussed such a chart--or something close to it, I believe, created by Calice Becker, the creator of Beyond Paradise Men for Estee Lauder. There is also a book with adjectives describing the smells of different molecules, Turin also talked about it on his blog. A quick search of the PDF archive file will turn these up.

    Good question!
    De gustibus non est disputandum

  3. #3

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by CuyahogaJoe
    Is a large part of the attraction to fragrances trying to identify the note? (as a matter of opinion), or is there a more scientific (for lack of a better term) way to understand what you are smelling.

    Does a list of notes and what they are derived from available?, or is creating new notes by combining primary notes the whole idea of the creative process. (ie.yellow and blue makes green)

    I'd like to see some type of comprehensive chart where (for example) Neroli, Brazilian Rosewood, Sandalwood,Tonka etc. are listed and their associated notes identified.

    If this list doesn't exist, is there a better place than here to compile one? I understand it would be quite a time consuming task, but there isn't a deadline on completion...maybe it can never be completed! I'm thinking along the lines of Wikipedia type format.

    What's your opinion?
    It's a great idea! YOU do it!
    Seriously, I'm sure you would have a lot of help from many gracious basenoters. One thing I am finding is that knowing the notes sometimes ruins the mystique of a fragrance you love. For example, I never got the cedar note in Tam Dao until someone pointed it out. It hasn't detracted from my enjoyment of TD, but I am more aware of its components, and it is somehow less mysterious now.

    Sometimes it's better to just say, "I love this" without deconstructing it.

    Paul
    “Enjoy the little things, for one day you may look back and realize they were the big things.”

    ~ Robert Brault

  4. #4

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    Paul,

    Agreed! This is one of the points I was making in an earlier post describing L'Homme Sage (beauty defined is beauty lost, or something like that). However, I believe it increases the enjoyment of a thing for a mind like mine if I can deconstruct it to the point I understand why I like it so much.
    De gustibus non est disputandum

  5. #5

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by ifconfig
    Paul,

    Agreed! This is one of the points I was making in an earlier post describing L'Homme Sage (beauty defined is beauty lost, or something like that). However, I believe it increases the enjoyment of a thing for a mind like mine if I can deconstruct it to the point I understand why I like it so much.
    There's also the point of learning exactly what notes you enjoy and not for the purpose of selecting new frags to try. Since there's probably no chance I can test even 1/10th of all the scents out there, this is quite useful.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    I'm surprised nobody replied with "Sicilian Tangerine+ Brazilian Rosewood+ Coriander+ Damask Rose+ Sandalwood+ Vanilla+ Ambrette seed= Egoiste

    The reason I even brought it up is because of a particular note which I just can't wear...I call it the "Italian note". Trussardi L'uomo and uomo has it as does Biagiotti uomo, but I swear I smell it in Dior Jules which of course is not "Italian". If a glossary existed, it would be a simple matter of cross referencing an unsampled frag with one of known characteristics...this would then tell me which notes/frags to avoid. It's obviously a matter of inexperience (on my part), but then, a novice would be able to make better informed decisions as to his/her preferences.

    There is little doubt the task is daunting and that is exactly why I posed the challenge here. The membership could contribute as much or as little as anyone wanted. An increased understanding can only help not only individuals by directing them toward an acknowledged or familiar path, but I believe it would help the industry itself by understanding what the population might be drawn to.

    All of the intellectual property would become property of BaseNotes and if there is ever anything close to a completed glossary, the site's owner could publish it and perhaps even reward the contributors. (at the owners discretion of course)
    Last edited by CuyahogaJoe; 15th January 2007 at 10:18 PM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentsibility
    Sometimes it's better to just say, "I love this" without deconstructing it.

    Paul
    Agreed. I like to think of a scent in an intuitive way as to the mood, experience, or atmosphere it provokes for me much more than the specific notes my nose picks up. Nevertheless, AFTER I enjoy (or don't enjoy) that experience, it is fun to find out what notes go into creating it, but only because it is helpful in picking a future fragrance. For example, if I find that the number of scents I don't like consistently have tonka bean in them, I'd probably want to stay away from a fragrance called "Tonka Max" or something.

    But, at base, the intuition and relational stance towards a fragrance is much more enjoyable to me, not the science.
    Is there any point in saying everything? -Basho

  8. #8

    Default Re: Note Glossary

    Quote Originally Posted by ifconfig
    In one of Luca Turin's blog posts, he discussed such a chart--or something close to it, I believe, created by Calice Becker, the creator of Beyond Paradise Men for Estee Lauder. There is also a book with adjectives describing the smells of different molecules, Turin also talked about it on his blog. A quick search of the PDF archive file will turn these up.
    The chart by Calice Becker, I believe, does not deal with the character ("what does it smell") of the substances but rather their molecular properties, namely speed of vaporization and intensity of smell.

    I found a page that mentions this specific chart and explains it further: http://www.chandlerburr.com/newsite/...blished/11.php

Similar Threads

  1. What's your least favorite note?
    By Quarry in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 55
    Last Post: 2nd April 2009, 03:38 AM
  2. Need Help Identifying a Note
    By sakecat22 in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 3rd September 2007, 04:33 PM
  3. Tobacco note in L by Lolita Lempicka???
    By cherub in forum Just Starting Out
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 2nd January 2007, 07:12 PM
  4. Why cumin as a fragrance note?
    By sherrie11 in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 17th November 2006, 02:45 PM
  5. Tried Rive Gauche and Kouros today...
    By Scentronic in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 66
    Last Post: 13th August 2006, 03:11 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000