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Thread: Scent Fatigue

  1. #1

    Default Scent Fatigue

    Well this has me alarmed. I mainly buy fragrances because they smell good to ME. Once the alleged "scent fatigue" sets in, though, I won't be able to smell what I love anymore! That'll probably lead to over-application and the peeving-off of those around me. So, my question(s) is:

    When does scent fatigue set in?
    How long and how does it take for scent fatigue to dissipate?
    Is scent fatigue only present with one particular scent, or with your sense of smell in general?
    -------------
    And out of the darkness, a voice spoke. "Smile, and be happy, for it can always be worse." So I smiled, and I was happy, and it did get worse.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    As with most anything, it's going to vary by person and situation.

    Onset of olfactory fatigue for me can be as short as ten minutes.

    Since the 'fading' of the fatigue is gradual, it's hard to say precisely how long it takes. I would say it is at least hours. You might want to try using a nasal spray and see if you can speed the process. As I understand it, the hairs in your nose get coated with the fragrance and re-radiate it.

    I've noticed that I lose the stronger notes of a fragrance. (like the vanilla in Obsession) I haven't done a test, but I'm pretty sure my overall sense of smell is not as sharp once I've entered OF.

    The general answer to the problem is not to apply as much fragrance near your head. (or on it!)

    I switched my application method from pulse points on wrists and neck to on my chest under my undershirt for that reason. Where before, the fragrance on my neck would cause OF and the fragrance would evaporate off the warm skin of my pulse points in four hours or so, now on hair and some on the undershirt, it doesn't evaporate as quickly and if I want to smell it, I can tuck my nose in my shirt and pluck at my shirt for a bellows-type action. This will present the fragrance for up to twenty hours or so later. Of course, this method produces less sillage.

    The other answer is to stay on pulse points but carry an atomiser to reapply. With that you have to be careful not to overapply (which is tricky when you're already in OF).

    Hope this helps

  3. #3
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    Wink Re: Scent Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by radix023

    I switched my application method from pulse points on wrists and neck to on my chest under my undershirt for that reason. Where before, the fragrance on my neck would cause OF and the fragrance would evaporate off the warm skin of my pulse points in four hours or so, now on hair and some on the undershirt, it doesn't evaporate as quickly and if I want to smell it, I can tuck my nose in my shirt and pluck at my shirt for a bellows-type action. This will present the fragrance for up to twenty hours or so later. Of course, this method produces less sillage.
    ...and I thought I was the only Basenoter who did that
    Our job is to live joyfully in this world of sorrows--Joseph Campbell

  4. #4

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    Thankfully, i haven't had any scent-fatigue episodes (yet).
    I think it might be a good idea to change your scent on a daily basis.
    As for the questions, i think it's a very personal experience and it varies a lot.
    I'd say it takes between 4 days to a week to dissipate, as some people have told me.
    And it's more particular to one scent.
    If it involves the sense of smell in general, there might be other variables involved, included (not to intentionally scare you) personal health.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    I've never had scent fatigue and never will. The only people who get it are those who use one single scent exclusively for three of four days in a row.

    Don't believe me? When was the last time you walked into McDonald's and failed to smell the french fries or big Macs in front of you? Or the smell of coffee? (Alternatively, substitute whichever favourite food place you usually go to).

    They're all odors that you are smelling. One doesn't suddenly stop smelling odors just because they're in scents. One only stops smelling any odor that one is constantly exposed to - which is a very handy trait for sewer workers and the like.
    Renato

  6. #6

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    Yes up to a point - are the smells associated with McDonalds as noticeable after you've been in there for half an hour?

    I would say not.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by Dante
    Yes up to a point - are the smells associated with McDonalds as noticeable after you've been in there for half an hour?

    I would say not.
    Would a big Mac smell like a big Mac, or french fries smell like french fries after half an hour?

    I would say yes.

    There is a difference between not orienting on odors as opposed to not actually smelling those odors. We automatically filter out the vast majority of things we smell, hear and see - otherwise we would be overwhelmed by detail. This process is referred to as orienting.
    Renato
    Last edited by Renato; 17th January 2007 at 03:39 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato
    There is a difference between not orienting on odors as opposed to not actually smelling those odors. We automatically filter out the vast majority of things we smell, hear and see - otherwise we would be overwhelmed by detail. This process is referred to as orienting.
    Renato
    I am assuming the initial post refers to the former.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Scent Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by castorpollux
    Thankfully, i haven't had any scent-fatigue episodes (yet).
    I think it might be a good idea to change your scent on a daily basis.
    As for the questions, i think it's a very personal experience and it varies a lot.
    I'd say it takes between 4 days to a week to dissipate, as some people have told me.
    And it's more particular to one scent.
    If it involves the sense of smell in general, there might be other variables involved, included (not to intentionally scare you) personal health.
    I was thinking of doing that, actually!
    Well, now I just have to go and find five more scents and $250.
    This should get interesting if I ever get my art sold off.
    -------------
    And out of the darkness, a voice spoke. "Smile, and be happy, for it can always be worse." So I smiled, and I was happy, and it did get worse.

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