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  1. #1

    Default shaking cologne?

    is is bad to shake your cologne bottle before you spray?

    i'm thinking it will increase its scent concentration since the oils may settle and make it overall more effective and balanced.

    thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Well, the part that you're actually applying to yourself was already in the sprayer tube. It won't move even if you shake the bottle.

    Plus, I think that if the oil were settling, there would be a visible effect, especially with clear bottles. I don't there should be an issue.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  3. #3

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    hmm...bubbles
    Last edited by G Man; 13th March 2007 at 04:58 AM. Reason: i was mad

  4. #4

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Is it bad to shake them? I doubt it, but I also doubt there's any benefit. You could always spray one side of your body before shaking, then shake it like a polaroid picture and spray the other side of your body. Then see if you notice any difference during the day on the shook versus unshook side.

    Wasn't there a Halston fragrance that separated, when at rest, into two different colors, and one was supposed to shake vigorously so the two parts would mix before applying? I thought it was Catalyst, but a quick google suggests I'm remembering wrong. Hmm.
    Spray it, donít say itÖ
    WARDROBE

  5. #5

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    I've seen mentioned here that you ought not to shake them, because it exposes more of the fragrance to air than otherwise would be (the air in the bottle, but I suppose it might make a difference). Since there's no visual effect I've ever noticed other than the occasional bubbliness, I would be inclined not to shake.

  6. #6

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Quote Originally Posted by G Man View Post
    OK, seriously, who is the jerk off who is marking EVERY single one of my topics ONE STAR. It's annoying. I asked a good question...I'm sure others have thought of it before too. God... someone is a hater. I googled this already too, and all that came up was "shake the cologne" but that was only for home made colognes.

    whoever it is, step up.
    My friend,
    I think it is best if you decide that it just doesn't matter. You asked your question, and you can take comfort in the fact that members can and will reply to it if they believe they can be helpful to you. I note several examples of that on this thread already.

    Any further communication about this you can send to me by PM and I'll be glad to help out. That will keep your thread on topic, and get you more answers to what you really want to know, as well.
    --Chris
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  7. #7

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    I would agree with Schareid that shaking the bottle will shorten the life of the fragrance by putting oxygen into the juice. Oxygen is highly reactive and will over time destroy you cologne.

    I also agree with several comments which observed that because of the uniform appearance of the juice that shaking will have no benefit.

    So I would suggest making an effort to NOT shake your fragrances.
    In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane - Oscar Wilde

  8. #8

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    i actually don't shake like a can of creme..i turn it upside down a few times gently. it still causes bubbles though.

  9. #9

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    I usually shake...sometimes violently, but when I'm worried about not spilling my last bottle of Patou, I think it is normal to shake...or are you talking about shaking the bottle?..never mind!

  10. #10

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    It was the Halston Catalyst aftershave that separated and had to be shaken, to answer a previous question.

    I once found an old bottle of Obsession for women in one of my parents' bathroom cupboards that has been there for literally many years, untouched. I sprayed some on (enough to clear the tube... which was obviously too much), but it smelled totally wrong. The next day I went back, shook up the bottle, sprayed a few sprays to again clear the tube, and sprayed it on- and it was back to the Obsession that I remembered.

    I doubt, though, that any of our stuff is going to be sitting around long enough for this to happen. I also doubt that shaking too much is going to in any way "damage" the fragrance, by why take the chance?

  11. #11

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuffman View Post
    It was the Halston Catalyst aftershave that separated and had to be shaken, to answer a previous question.
    Cheers for that!
    Spray it, donít say itÖ
    WARDROBE

  12. #12

    Cool Re: shaking cologne?

    I shake 'em, I don't quite know why I do it though. Not very helpful, I know

  13. #13

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Hmmm... interesting topic. I never thought about shaking the bottle. My thinking is along with others that say because there does not appear to be any separation in the bottle, there is no need to do it. Also I have never noticed any real difference between the scent at the start of a bottle and that at the end of the bottle, but that could be because I cannot remember exactly what it smelled like when the bottle was new.

  14. #14

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    I find that it takes a bit of air in some bottles before a fragrance opens up.

  15. #15

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Ever seen a SA shake a frag bottle before spraying you or a card? Doubt it.

    Ever seen a frag box that said "Shake well before applying?" I haven't.

    Ever heard an industry expert say you should shake the bottle before applying? I haven't.

    Ever read on a perfume-related web site (perfumer, manufacturer, sales, blog, info, etc.) that you should shake the perfume before applying? I haven't.

    Ever heard or read from a reliable sources that you SHOULDN'T shake a perfume? I haven't.

    Do you know how much it gets shaken during transport from manufacturer to distributer to retailer (to eBayer) to you? A LOT!

    Shake it, don't shake it. It doesn't matter. It will smell the same.

    Furthermore, most perfume bottles are hermetically sealed. Air cannot get in unless you turn the bottle upside-down and spray until the tube empties of liquid. Then, if you turn the bottle right-side-up again and spray, you will see air bubbles come out of the tube on a couple of the first pumps - until the tube is full again. This is probably not a good idea. The less air in the bottle, the better. In fact, could the bottles be sealed at the factory with a slight vacuum in order to remove as much air as possible? Probably not, given that such little room remains for air in a full bottle and due to the extra costs and equipment that would be involved, but it would be possible.

  16. #16

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Quote Originally Posted by MadScientist View Post
    Furthermore, most perfume bottles are hermetically sealed. Air cannot get in unless you turn the bottle upside-down and spray until the tube empties of liquid. Then, if you turn the bottle right-side-up again and spray, you will see air bubbles come out of the tube on a couple of the first pumps - until the tube is full again. This is probably not a good idea. The less air in the bottle, the better. In fact, could the bottles be sealed at the factory with a slight vacuum in order to remove as much air as possible? Probably not, given that such little room remains for air in a full bottle and due to the extra costs and equipment that would be involved, but it would be possible.
    I'm sorry but air does get into the bottles to equalize the pressure when you spray. If it didn't you would very quickly not be able to get any fragrance out. It is simple physics. Chemistry tells you that exposure to oxygen will degrade a fragrance over time. While I agree that it will take a while, over time shaking the bottle will degrade the fragrance.
    In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane - Oscar Wilde

  17. #17

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Quote Originally Posted by oolong View Post
    I'm sorry but air does get into the bottles to equalize the pressure when you spray. If it didn't you would very quickly not be able to get any fragrance out. It is simple physics.
    You will not get enough of a vacuum inside a small perfume bottle to override the pump/pressure cabability of the sprayer. How is air getting into the bottle? There are no bubbles coming up from the sprayer if i turn it upside-down and spray, no matter how many times i spray. And there are no bubbles coming up from the bottom of the tube if I spray it right-side-up - everybody who has eyes can see this. So how exactly is air getting in there? If it is coming in from the top/cap upon each release of the sprayer, why are no air bubbles produced when I turn the bottle upside-down and spray? As I said, if you turn it upside down and spray until the juice in the tube is emptied, you MAY then get an exchange of air in and out of the bottle and MAY get an equalization of pressure because of the way the pump mechanism operates. It is not "simple physics," it is simple mechanics and fluid dynamics.

    Ever use spray-type concentrated laundry stain removers like Spray-N-Wash? Ever notice that the sides of the bottle tend to collapse inward a bit the emptier it gets? This is because there is no air getting in. A vacuum is being created. But the bottle is small enough and the trigger-pump powerful enough that the pump mechanism can overcome the vacuum pressure. Same concept.

    http://science.howstuffworks.com/question673.htm

    Quote Originally Posted by oolong View Post
    Chemistry tells you that exposure to oxygen will degrade a fragrance over time. While I agree that it will take a while, over time shaking the bottle will degrade the fragrance.
    There is only one way oxygen might get into the bottle, as i described, and I advise not doing it because yes, over time, oxygen exposure will degrade perfume - I don't disagree with that. I am just pointing out that under normal conditions, you are not going to get additional air into the bottle AND most people (granted, BNoters don't necessarily fall into the "most people" category) will use the juice up before the air already in the bottle can do enough damage to noticeably change the scent. In other words, it's essentially a mute issue.

    ---------------

    Assuming the pump works as I describe and that additional oxygen does not get into the bottle under normal use, wouldn't the juice degrade only to a certain point and then stop? I have only a basic knowledge of chemistry but I would not expect that an oxygen molecule could bind to a perfume molecule, destroy it (oxidize it; change its scent), and then move on to the next perfume molecule. Doesn't the oxygen molecule bind to the perfume molecule and essentially, stay bound? If so, I conclude that the small amount of oxygen left in the bottle at production time will only alter a very tiny portion of the juice, of which is not enough to cause a perceptible change, even over a long period of time.

    Light and heat are the evildoers you have to watch out for. I say you will not detect a difference in the scent of a cologne whether shaken, stirred, or calm.
    Last edited by MadScientist; 14th March 2007 at 07:21 PM.

  18. #18

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    MadScientist, I like your argument, very intuitive, but I just realized one thing. How do you explain the bubbles when you shake the bottle? Bubbles are formed when a liquid surrounds an air pocket. If liquid surrounds a vacuum, the bubble collapses and you have no bubble. I don't know how the air gets in, but I assure you it does. That being said, shaking the bottle will not increase oxidation of the cologne, because oxidation will stop once you have completely used up your oxygen supply. Observe iron. If left in a sealed box, it will only oxidize do a certain point because oxidization uses up the oxygen.
    - Rich

    PS - Forgot to mention that shaking a bottle is not advised. Essential oils are very fragile, and even shaking them may degrade their structure.
    As always, disregard most of what I say. It's not worth your heart health to actually worry about what a 23 year old guy from Kansas thinks. Even if he is really ridiculously good looking.

  19. #19

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    I understand how pump sprays work and I also understand the extreme difficulty of maintaining a vacuum over an extended time, the potentially years it takes to empty a bottle of cologne. Labs with top end equipment would be hard pressed to do that. I think the error in your logic is to assume that air infiltration occurs at the same time as the spraying rather then over time. We can argue about this all day but the next time you empty a bottle of fragrance I challenge you to force open the top. I think you will find that there is not a vacuum.
    In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane - Oscar Wilde

  20. #20

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Quote Originally Posted by MadScientist View Post
    Air cannot get in unless you turn the bottle upside-down and spray until the tube empties of liquid.
    Ok, I'll restate: The bottle/pump is not designed to allow air in.

    Quote Originally Posted by oolong View Post
    I'm sorry but air does get into the bottles to equalize the pressure when you spray.
    Quote Originally Posted by oolong View Post
    I think the error in your logic is to assume that air infiltration occurs at the same time as the spraying rather then over time.
    I do not assume that air infiltration does not occur. YOU stated it. We're not talking precision mechanics here - just cheap spray pumps. Flaws in materials and construction will allow oxygen infiltration over time. I would not expect to hear a sucking sound if I pried off the spray pump of an empty perfume bottle that had been emptied over time. However, I wouldn't be surprised to hear a sucking sound from a bottle that one intentionally sprayed until empty and then immediately pried open.

    Quote Originally Posted by _R$_ View Post
    "Bubbles are formed when a liquid surrounds an air pocket. If liquid surrounds a vacuum, the bubble collapses and you have no bubble."
    I think the nature of a total vacuum would preclude it from ever existing as a bubble inside a liquid, but I get your point (I'm not a physicist though so I can't intelligently get into the details of liquid/vacuum interaction). I would not expect there to be a total vacuum or even a good vacuum inside a perfume bottle, only a vacuum in the sense that the pressure is less on the inside than on the outside but not strong enough to retard the function of the spayer. There is air inside the bottle so you will get air bubbles if you shake the bottle. I haven't said anything to imply that the "pocket" of non-juice inside a perfume bottle is a total vacuum.

    This really is a very interesting debate and I'm happy to continue but to sum-up and maybe clarify my original post: I have never heard, read, or seen anything to indicate that shaking perfume would affect it, bad or good. In my experience, a frag will not be perceptibly affected if shaken.

  21. #21

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    you know how on most perfume bottles there's the spray mechanism and the ring around it that you sort of push the spray mechanism into? does that make any sense? like you have the sprayer and the donut shaped thing that it stands inside? i think maybe the seal between these two is not airtight and this is how air gets in. but of course when i tip it outside no fragrance pours out, so maybe i'm wrong. but i agree, the bottles are not so carefully put together as to be airtight

  22. #22
    DON'T DRINK AND DRESS

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    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    My bet is that outside air enters the bottle during the recovery phase of the spray stroke.

    One way would be to employ a very simple one way 'bladder', normally closed over a hole in the inside of the spray/cap mechanism, that would keep liquid in the bottle even when turned upside down, while only allowing air in to equalize pressuren and never allowing air or liquid to escape the bottle through the hole. Then a return to a position that prevents both air coming in and liquid going out such opening would seal the bottle again, until another a vacuum is formed inside by spraying, to move the bladder and open the hole for air to enter again.
    'Those who grow too big for their pants will be exposed in the end'--anon

  23. #23
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    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    This is easily the most insane thread I've ever seen.


    I'd guess that maybe the air seeps in slowly through the seal gradually as the vaccuum inside increases.

    I think picking it up and using it does just about all the mixing that may be required.
    Lately I've been wearing:
    Windsor, Bois de Santal, Original Santal, Elixir, Douro, Endymion, Reflection, Arcus, Marwah

  24. #24

    Default Re: shaking cologne?

    Ultimately I mostly agree with MadScientist. Shaking a cologne does not make much difference for the typical fragrance user. It makes about as much sense as keeping your fragrances in some form of refrigeration. For the typical user who uses up their fragrance within a few years of purchase, it is really does not make sense to worry about it. For people with a significant investment in many expensive fragrances who want maximize the shelf life, I feel it is a genuine consideration, especially for fragrances with a splash application rather then spray.
    In all matters of opinion, our adversaries are insane - Oscar Wilde

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