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View Poll Results: Are custom bottles important to you?

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43. You may not vote on this poll
  • Yes, I expect a custom bottle that expresses a fragrance's personality.

    11 25.58%
  • No, I care more about the fragrance, and the bottle is of little importance.

    32 74.42%
Results 1 to 23 of 23
  1. #1
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    Quarry's Avatar
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    Question A perfume house surveys your opinions

    BACKGROUND TO THIS SURVEY: While emailing staff at a perfume house on a routine matter, our interchange took an unexpected twist when I mentioned I was a graphic designer who had opinions about containers, labels, packaging and point-of-purchase displays. After a series of discussions, I volunteered to conduct a survey on this perfume house's behalf (they wish to remain anonymous). Your comments may help shape the industry, so please participate.

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes or No

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer

    [A dabber being a wand kept in the bottle and attached to the cap that, when pulled out, applies a drop of perfume when you touch it to your skin. A reducer being a small opening that allows you to invert a bottle to receive a drop of perfume on your fingertip which you then touch to your skin.]

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes or No

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.

    I'm sure any other concise comments about sprayers, bottles, and visual product identity would be useful, so please feel free to share them.
    In a world where 6 million people are added each month, every landscape matters.

  2. #2

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Interesting survey Quarry! I hope our voices will be heard.

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes, unless they are very unattractive bottles. Appearances also count.

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    No

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes, but only if it would have a distinct shape so that it's different from other bottles. I'd prefer a different colour though, I store all my fragrances in the dark anyway.

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    A dabber

    [A dabber being a wand kept in the bottle and attached to the cap that, when pulled out, applies a drop of perfume when you touch it to your skin. A reducer being a small opening that allows you to invert a bottle to receive a drop of perfume on your fingertip which you then touch to your skin.]

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Can be unpractical when you wish to give it a full wearing, but not bad at all for testing the scent on your skin.
    "Perfume is the dream that carries me."

    There is always the sky to look at

  3. #3

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Depends on what they want to do and how they price their perfumes. If the saving gets passed on to me then fantastic; if it enables a new company to start up without having to break the bank ordering custom bottles, then grand. But if they use it as an excuse to make more profits then I'll choose the pretty bottle that makes my dressing table look good thank you very much. Note: I DO think that non-frag-hags would find the look of the bottle important unless it's all part of the brand.

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes - hell, that can be a style statement all its own. Aluminium spray bottles seem popular. It speaks of modernity rather than luxurious opulence, but it all depends on what brand identity they're trying to project. There are a few directions you could spin this to create an identity but think of it this way - the Chanel bottles aren't much more than practical but they've become iconic.

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer
    Have never been lucky enough to have pure parfum but to get every last drop I guess a reducer - sounds easier to control and you've less risk of dripping precious jus on the carpet.

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes - mini edt.

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    It's a pain with a mini of an edt as you can't get enough out - different for an edp or parfum I imagine.

  4. #4

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Quarry View Post
    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little
    (c) Matters little


    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes or No
    Yes, as long as "less-expensive" doesn't mean "poorly made"


    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]
    Yes, that sounds great. I'm sure Musse would approve, too!


    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3...
    N/A


    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer
    I tend not to like wearing pure perfume (I've sampled some but never purchased). So maybe I'm outside the target market here. But I think I'd like either the Spray or the Reducer. Seems to me that the dabber goes back and forth between skin contact and the juice in the bottle, which could lead to contamination.


    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes or No
    Yes: bottles with reducer (Mugler Cologne splash bottle), minis with small openings (several).


    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.
    I don't mind the TM Cologne splash bottle, because I literally "splash" some into my hand and then press/slap it on wherever I want to wear it. This wouldn't work for a scent that needs a lighter application. I tolerate minis that "pour" rather than spraying, but I don't really like this style. I almost always prefer a spray applicator.


    other concise comments
    The best spray mechanisms in my opinion are those with a long "throw" like on the Creed bottles, so you can choose between a full spritz and a lesser amount. I know some folks dislike aluminum bottles (à la CSP & Montale), but I think they're fine. There is something appealing, I admit, about sturdier designs like a hefty glass bottle.
    Last edited by PaulSC; 31st August 2007 at 03:38 PM.
    Spray it, don’t say it…
    WARDROBE

  5. #5

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1--b;
    2--Yes;
    3 -- Depending on the price: the higher the price, the more attractive I expect the packaging to be;
    3b -- I knew that, but that's why I keep all the outer boxes if possible -- No;
    4 -- Reducer;
    5 -- Yes;
    5b -- I guess, I am a traditionalist!

    And I think I know the name of the "House"!

  6. #6

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Hi Quarry - this is fascinating. I've been careful not to read other people's replies before posting so I'm not...unduly influenced!


    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?

    C) - I've actually been put off buying the Bond frags because I feel the emphasis and expense in production has been on bottle design where it should have been on the juice.

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?

    Hell yeah!

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?

    Yes. I don't feel I'm getting a worse experience from companies like Jo Malone, CB I Hate Perfume, Penhaligons and Diptyque just because they use plain bottles customised by labels - I actually prefer it for reasons I mentioned in q1. Etro strike a nice balance where you can buy the plain bottle or spend a little extra on the pretty engraved ones.

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    n/a

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?

    I prefer a spray (see #5 for expanded reasons on this). It's not difficult to press gently for a less forceful application, and most of my pur parfums are in small quantities in, for example, handbag sprays, which spray much less volume of juice per squirt than a larger bottle might.

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?

    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?

    I don't really like it - I also don't like dabbers for the same reason. I know this is just me being ultra-fussy, but I always feel that if I allow something to touch my skin and then go back into the perfume (this includes reducers where I feel I have to touch the open end of the bottle) it's contaminating the perfume I've spent so much on. I also find reducers are less controlable and I use a lot more in one application than I do from a spray bottle.

    One problem here is that pur parfums and some of my more expensive EDPs (Guet Apens and Guerlinade, I'm looking at you) often come with open necks, and I always worry about spilling some, slipping up and over-applying or knocking them over when applying. This is partly because these are things I've paid a lot for, so I'm very careful around them, but I don't like the fact that they cause me a (very small) amount of worry every time I use them.

    What else? Well, I really like refills. I've a few Guerlain sucriers which get refilled, and it's a nice way to use perfume where outside from the initial expense of buying the sucrier itself, you're spending less on repurchases because you're buying refill bottles rather than pretty bottles. I also buy refills and testers intended for shop use and ignore the bottle on occasion because I'm more interested in what's inside the bottle than the way it looks on a shelf (there are so many perfumes on my dressing table that it's impossible to stop it looking messy, and they all live inside their cardboard boxes anyway to keep them safe from light, so the bottles are not on display).

  7. #7

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1. c

    2. yes

    3. yes :wave: to PaulSC

    4. dabber

    5. yes

    5b. unpractical, hard to get the right amount
    Everything passes. Everything changes. Just do what you think you should do.
    --Bob Dylan

  8. #8

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) b. I like cool packaging, but I also like decent juice.

    2) Yes, as long as the savings is substantial (15+&#37. Proof: Thierry Mugler offers Angel refills at retail with the Angel Source, which on average saves Angel users about 35-40% compared to buying a new bottle. I've seen the cartridges that go in the glitzy dispensers... they're just plain aluminum bottles with the Angel and Thierry Mugler logos on it.

    3) Yes... the bottle design alone sounds cool.

    3b) Nope... I like the idea from the get-go.

    4) I've never used pure parfum, so no comment.

    5) Yes
    5b) It's hit or miss. When testing Bond No. 9's Wall Street from a splash-only sample vial (twice), I put way too much on. And Wall Street is pretty potent, so I couldn't wash off the excess juice. Same went for the time when I tried John Varvatos Vintage from a similar vial. OTOH, the Mugler Cologne splash sample vials and bottle work the way you want it to... not too much, not too little. I still prefer sprays, though, as it's significantly easier to control application.
    Last edited by MFfan310; 31st August 2007 at 08:36 PM.
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    2) Aventus - Creed
    3) Flower of Immortality - By Kilian
    4) L'Humaniste - Frapin
    5) Millesime Imperial - Creed

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  9. #9

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Dabber

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.

    It's kind of gross, and I do wonder about contact with my skin changing the composition of the fragrance.
    And he whose soul is flat -- the sky
    Will cave in on him by and by.

    —from "Renascence" by Edna St. Vincent Millay

  10. #10

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Fairly new at this, but...

    1) C

    2) Yes; emphatically yes.

    3) Yes. Besides, the best places for displaying nice bottles - windowsills and other well-lit places - are bad places for storing perfume.

    4) Spray would be my first choice, reducer my second, and dabber the least desirable of those mentioned.

    5) Yes

    5b) You have less control than a spray, and if the perfume is very liquid, one runs the risk of wasting perfume by having it run down ones finger and onto ones hand. When I'm using reducers I usually put a drop or two on each wrist rather than finger application.

    A few general comments:

    There seems to be an ever-growing trend of buying things - especially luxury goods - online, where the packaging matters a lot less. A nice label and a nice website will do a lot to make people forget about the bottle.

  11. #11

    TaoLady's Avatar
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    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Quarry View Post
    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes or No

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer

    [A dabber being a wand kept in the bottle and attached to the cap that, when pulled out, applies a drop of perfume when you touch it to your skin. A reducer being a small opening that allows you to invert a bottle to receive a drop of perfume on your fingertip which you then touch to your skin.]

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes or No

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain. Works well with intensely concentrated frags.
    Hope that does it!! (And please keep us posted...you do lead the most interesting life!! )
    "The world is ruled by letting things take their course. It cannot be ruled by interfering." Lao Tze

  12. #12

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Dabber/Reducer

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Not really, it's just better than spraying for higher perfume concentrations

  13. #13

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    Somewhat to Very Important. With over a million bottles at the fragrance counter, it makes me reach for it even more over the others, as well as, I love pretty looking bottles.

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    No

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    No

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    No, why can't you have both?

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray...on the go in the morning, hard time carefully dabbing, as well as Pure Parfums range from 15-30% perfume oil, very much like most 20% EDP, so no big difference.

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    No

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    N/A
    Last edited by Niemand; 1st September 2007 at 12:32 AM.

  14. #14

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    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    Quote Originally Posted by Quarry View Post
    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?

    (a) Very important, --- The important thing is matching a bottle to the personality of the
    fragrance. My HG -- kai -- is pure casual sexy, and I'm happy with
    the 'custom' touch of mere purple string on a roll-on.

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?

    Yes -- With a big ol' caveat : I don't like cheap. CB IHP is a brand identity of and a grand persona of cut the crap, --hard to carry off. I know cheap when I see cheap and nothing about my perfume hobby embraces cheap or utilitarian. 'Less expensive' is fine but it must be special and appropriate. I despise polyester and vinyl. I just do.

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?

    Maybe. It better be a hell of a label to outweigh mass production K-Mart bottles.

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?

    No. Please. I do know that.

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?

    Reducer


    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?

    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?

    I have original violet glass bottles of Highland Lilac--all one piece of solid glass and it STUNS me that they changed to run-of-the-mill clear sprayers. Mass market strikes again! Reality TV is a mindset I abhor.

    I'm sure any other concise comments about sprayers, bottles, and visual product identity would be useful, so please feel free to share them.
    Must we be so manic depressive? Can't we keep a luxury option with a REFILL alternative??????
    Please, spritz responsibly.

  15. #15

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?

    (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?

    Yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?

    Yes

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?

    Dabber

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?

    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?

    Not my favourite kind of bottle but I can manage it occasionally.

    I'm sure any other concise comments about sprayers, bottles, and visual product identity would be useful, so please feel free to share them.

    I like most functional, simple, streamlined bottles like the classic Chanel bottle and both Serge Lutens bottles (extra points for the choice of spray in the export bottles).
    "Wovon man nicht lesen kann, darüber muss man schreiben."

  16. #16
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    The juice is the drug. The rest is irrelevant. Beautiful bottles can be sold separately.

  17. #17

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]
    Yes A pretty bottle is nice, and will sometimes sway me towards a perfume (eg Alien) but ultimately it's the juice that counts. All my bottles that come in packaging stay in it, anyway.

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer

    I prefer not to touch the perfume if I can help it, and spray gives a more controlled application. All my pure perfumes are splashes or dabs, though.

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.
    I dislike it as a rule (see #4), but in most cases there's not much choice.
    Last edited by Indiscreet; 1st September 2007 at 07:07 AM.

  18. #18

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) (c) Matters little
    I must admit there are some gorgeous bottles out there and I will sometimes covet one, but it would never make me buy a juice I didn’t like, nor would a simple functional bottle ever stop me or even slow me down.

    2) Yes – hands down.

    3) Yes – and I have.


    4)I don’t mind a dabber in a small bottle, but I would prefer not to risk contaminating a full ounce.

    I am happy to spray, even pure perfume.


    5) Yes
    5b)Reducers are a bit annoying but not a deal killer.Tiny openings can be trouble, you sometimes have to shake them to get anything out and it's easy to overdo.

    Let me add that I am always very grateful when a scent comes in a splash bottle with an extra atomizer cap included. This is a small expense for the manufacturer that I am happy to pay a bit extra for. It’s so much easier if you use purse atomizers and it’s good to have an alternative if the sprayer malfunctions. And let’s just not even contemplate the unhappy time with pliers that happens when a fused-on spray head fails.

  19. #19

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    b

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    yes

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    reducer

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    don't like to contaminate parfum with finger
    I buy eye droppersfor bottles of parfum or pour them into vials so I don't contaminate the whole bottle.

  20. #20

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) Do I care if it's a custom designed bottle? - c) not important

    2) If the bottle added to the cost significantly, would I prefer if the perfume house used less expensive containers? - Yes. I'd rather have them spend the money on the juice or the development of new scents. I don't collect perfume bottles, so the appearance of the bottle means little to me.

    3) Would I consider buying fragrance in a cobalt-blue lab bottle? Absolutely! Actually, I think I've had more scents in plain lab bottles than I have in fancy ones. Shows you what a noob I am :' )

    4) Spray, dabber, reducer? Reducer - I tend not to put on large quantities of any scent at once. Maybe 3 drops. This way - I can smell it and people close to me can smell it but I don't blow out the room. Especially if it's a scent with strong silliage. And I always fear the dabber will contaminate the perfume after I touch it to my skin.

    5) Have I ever used a reducer? Yes. I prefer this method of application (please see my response to question 4).

    I hope this helps!

  21. #21

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    Matters little
    Although I must admit that I adore sturdy square or rectangular bottles.
    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Sure
    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]
    Yes
    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray
    So much so that I even decant my perfumes into the tiniest spray bottles
    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes
    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.
    I don't like it at all.
    If it can't be spray, then a dabber is way better than a reducer...I always seem to produce little streams of perfume along my wrists and neck instead of drops when using a bottle with a reducer.
    Last edited by Lady_in_Black; 2nd September 2007 at 05:14 PM.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]Sniffing around
    I'll stop wearing black when they make something darker

  22. #22

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (a) Very important, (b) Somewhat important, (c) Matters little

    b. - Somewhat important, as I can't deny a pleasing presentation is part of the fun.

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes or No

    Yes, I would rather have less-expensive containers and better quality fragrance. (However not necessarily more fragrances- only if the fragrances are of high quality, very imaginative, and creative.)

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes or No [if yes, skip to question #4]

    Most certainly yes.

    3b) If you answered "no" to question #3 and you knew that your fragrance would have greater stability/longevity/fidelity when stored in an opaque, blue bottle, would you change your answer?
    Yes or No

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Spray, Dabber, Reducer

    A REDUCER, thank you!

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes or No

    Yes.

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    Please explain.

    If it's a reducer that drops out the fragrance one drop at a time, I think it's a great way to apply fragrance. Since you're never touching your finger to the perfume it would seem to keep the rest of the juice sanitary so that it hopefully keeps longer. It's also possible to use something like a cotton ball or q-tip if you don't want to use your finger.

    More: Since I'm a graphic artist I do understand the importance of making a product look attractive to the general populous. However because of the volatile nature of perfumes, I would much prefer them to come in opaque bottles. Then, have a pleasingly elegant/fun/gothic -whatever the current marketing campaign is- packaging around a more plain bottle. I always store my perfumes in the boxes they come in anyway, so only see the bottle when I take it out for use.
    Scent is such a lovely, simple pleasure!

  23. #23

    Default Re: A perfume house surveys your opinions

    1) If you like a fragrance, how important is it to you that it be presented in a custom-designed bottle?
    (c) Matters little

    2) If you knew that custom bottles added substantial cost to your fragrance or impaired the number/variety of fragrances a company could release to market, would you rather a perfume house choose less-expensive containers?
    Yes

    3) Would you consider buying a high-end fragrance in a laboratory-style, cobalt-blue bottle as long as an attractive label made it apparent that it contained a quality fragrance?
    Yes

    4) For pure perfume (as opposed to edt, edp, cologne), do you prefer a spray, a dabber, or a reducer to apply this concentrated form of scent?
    Reducer (thank you for explaining the term), but I prefer an opening large enough for a Q-tip to apply.

    [A dabber being a wand kept in the bottle and attached to the cap that, when pulled out, applies a drop of perfume when you touch it to your skin. A reducer being a small opening that allows you to invert a bottle to receive a drop of perfume on your fingertip which you then touch to your skin.]

    5) Have you ever used a reducer or bottle or mini with a small opening that requires fingertip application?
    Yes

    5b) If yes, do you have an opinion about this manner of application?
    I prefer an opening large enough for a Q-tip to fit through.

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