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Thread: Eau d'Italie

  1. #1

    Thumbs up Eau d'Italie

    I have seen Eau d'Italie bottles in perfumery in Moscow, on my last trip this summer, but I did not have any feelings about it, that was not so attractive package for me and usually after tersting "floural" perfumes "chypers" do not leave such impression, at least in my case.

    Today I have read Interview with Sebastián Alvarez Murena from Eau d'Italie, and I have to admit I felt shame because I judged perfume by shape of bottle.

    What are your experiences with those perfumes?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    I love all Eau D'Italie fragrances and would some day get a full bottle of Sienne L'Hiver, Bois D'Ombrie and Paestum Rose.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Welcome to basenotes Johanna.

    I love this line. The Bois d'Ombrie and Sienne l'Hiver are my favourites and they are perfect for the fall and winter. The BdO is warm, woody, very boozy, with touch of leather in the drydown. The SlH is very cool, yet it smoulders, very nice effect. Both have fabulous sillage and lasts a long time... I can still smell it the next morning.

    Like you, while I appreciate the design of the bottles, I am not impressed and I think that they do not do the fragrance justice. They look like bottles of room deoderizers rather than personal fragrances.
    Last edited by dimples; 1st October 2007 at 03:29 AM.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Thanks for warm welcome, I am getting known with this site, today I researched fragrances at Google and bumped here and many other, mostly shops, around net. I like this place.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    I really admire the fragrance artistry of Bertrand Duchaufour in the Eau D' Italie line. I think he created all of their fragrances? I own the Bois d' Ombrie and I like it quite a bit. I will probably purchase the Paestrum Rose - one of the best rose based frags suitable for a man that I have smelled! However, their bottles lack any design interest or artistry at all. They look exactly like the tall aluminum tube bottles you would normally to room spray in. The look just keeps you from wanting to test it off the shelf! Even the graphics and labelling on the bottles are very uninspired. This is one fo the few cases where the packaging of the product will probably determine the success (failure) of the product in a commercial sense. What upscale retailer of fragrance would want to place these items on their shelves? Its a shame because the fragrances are winners.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Like you, Johanna, I was turned off from the bottle (looks more like a bathroom spray). However, I managed to pick up a few samples of Bois d'Ombrie, Sienne l'Hiver, and Eau d'Italie and was very impressed, in particular with Bois d'Ombrie. Nice stuff indeed.
    Last edited by Nicolas V; 1st October 2007 at 05:04 PM.
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    I love a good flacon as much as the next scenthound, but, hey, Comptoir Sud Pacifique has equally ugly, all purpose bottles. And Ava Luxe (another favorite) also offers up all of its frags in Plain Jane containers, too.

    Concentrate on the juice. Just TRY Bois d'Ombrie once and then tell me you're not as hooked as I am!

    Peggy: "Right now, we have to get to the mental institution. Something terrible has happened."
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    welcome, Johanna.
    I have only sampled Sienne l'Hiver, but must say it is a gorgeous and memorable fragrance. Reminds me of an outdoor church, incense by the river, cold winter air and woods.
    give these a try, if you can.
    "Like a lobster with a pearl in its claw, the beet held the jasmine firmly without crushing or obscuring it. Beet lifted jasmine, the way a bullnecked partner lifts a ballerina, and the pair came on stage on citron's fluty cue. As if jasmine were a collection of beautiful paintings, beet hung it in the galleries of the nose, insured it against fire or theft, threw a party to celebrate it. Citron mailed the invitations." Jitterbug Perfume by Tom Robbins p. 189

    What I am loving right now: Shalimar vintage extrait, Chanel Bois des Iles, Chanel no. 22, Le Labo Iris 39, Guerlain Iris Ganache

  9. #9

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    I own both Eau d'Italie and Bois d'Ombrie. There is something really special about this line. They all share this abstract, peaceful, etherial vibe. They are like quiet poems that allow you to fill in the blanks at some points...steering you quietly but allowing you to interpret and influence in your own way. I cannot wait for a new release from this line.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie



    The Eau d’Italie line (particularly Bois d'Ombrie, Sienne L'Hiver, and Paestum Rose) is the logical extension and perfection of a number of accords Bertrand Duchaufour first started working on when he put together L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Timbuktu (2004) and L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Dzongkha (2006). IMO, the most successful in the series is Bois d’Ombrie. It takes elements of Duchaufour’s CdG Avignon and CdG Kyoto and marries them with the inchoate, rough accords of Timbuktu and Dzongkha and makes a fragrance that has all engaging elements of the four aforementioned fragrances, but which is also smoother, more fully integrated, and eminently more wearable and satisfying than any one of the four and even all of the four combined.

    scentemental


    Last edited by scentemental; 8th October 2007 at 01:41 PM.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post

    The Eau d’Italie line (particularly Bois d'Ombrie, Sienne L'Hiver, and Paestum Rose) is the logical extension and perfection of a number of accords Bertrand Duchaufour first started working on when he put together L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Timbuktu (2004) and L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Dzongkha (2006). IMO, the most successful in the series is Bois d’Ombrie, which takes elements of Duchaufour’s CdG Avignon and CdG Kyoto and marries them with the inchoate, jagged accords of Timbuktu and Dzongkha and makes a fragrance that has all engaging elements of the four aforementioned fragrances, but which is also smoother, more fully integrated, and eminently more wearable and satisfying that any one of the four and even all of the four combined.

    scentemental

    I fully concur with scentemental - Bois d'Ombrie is the definitive Duchaufour. It opens with a burst of alcohol-like smell, but moves fast into a subtle woody leathery phase with hints of smooth alcohol/cognac over a sweet amber base. The leather is of the salty smoky variety, which probably makes the connection to Avignon/Kyoto. I also detect rooty iris like as in Iris Silver Mist. Understated, yet intriguing. If you like Timbuktu and Dzongkha, Bois d'Ombrie is a must.
    Last edited by zztopp; 8th October 2007 at 04:53 AM.
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post


    The Eau d’Italie line (particularly Bois d'Ombrie, Sienne L'Hiver, and Paestum Rose) is the logical extension and perfection of a number of accords Bertrand Duchaufour first started working on when he put together L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Timbuktu (2004) and L'Artisan Parfumeur’s Dzongkha (2006). IMO, the most successful in the series is Bois d’Ombrie. It takes elements of Duchaufour’s CdG Avignon and CdG Kyoto and marries them with the inchoate, rough accords of Timbuktu and Dzongkha and makes a fragrance that has all engaging elements of the four aforementioned fragrances, but which is also smoother, more fully integrated, and eminently more wearable and satisfying than any one of the four and even all of the four combined.

    scentemental


    Scentemental - I finally got to sample all four fragrances that you referenced above - by Bertrand Duchaufour and now that I have smelled all of them I can relate to those accords that are similar in Dzonghka, Timbuktu, Kyoto and Avignon. On my skin the effect from Dzonghka (sadly) turns vinegar-esque (specifically apple cider vinegar - a very tangy note). From Timbuktu it is slightly acidic but much more complex and warmer. Kyoto is the sweetest of the bunch - almost swallowing up the acid top notes in one big gulp as soon as it hits my skin and warms up. Avignon it's buried subtly under the smoke.

    Fascinating how the same molecules achieve such wildly different results.

    Getting back to the point of this post: Having said the above, I remember Bois d'Ombrie being the most vinegar-esque of all five. I felt like I was standing above a barrel of pickles, it was so strongly acidic. Perhaps I should try this one more time to see how it does a second time - but I'm almost scared to.

    One more thing: Do you think Harissa (which is my sotd) and Sequoia by Comme des Garcons share any of these 'accords' mentioned above - since they were both also done by Mr. Duchaufour?
    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple"

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  13. #13

    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Scentemental - I finally got to sample all four fragrances that you referenced above - by Bertrand Duchaufour and now that I have smelled all of them I can relate to those accords that are similar in Dzonghka, Timbuktu, Kyoto and Avignon. On my skin the effect from Dzonghka (sadly) turns vinegar-esque (specifically apple cider vinegar - a very tangy note). From Timbuktu it is slightly acidic but much more complex and warmer. Kyoto is the sweetest of the bunch - almost swallowing up the acid top notes in one big gulp as soon as it hits my skin and warms up. Avignon it's buried subtly under the smoke.

    Fascinating how the same molecules achieve such wildly different results.

    Getting back to the point of this post: Having said the above, I remember Bois d'Ombrie being the most vinegar-esque of all five. I felt like I was standing above a barrel of pickles, it was so strongly acidic. Perhaps I should try this one more time to see how it does a second time - but I'm almost scared to.

    One more thing: Do you think Harissa (which is my sotd) and Sequoia by Comme des Garcons share any of these 'accords' mentioned above - since they were both also done by Mr. Duchaufour?

    Most definitely Mike. There's a sharp woody aroma chemical that shows up in the GdG incense fragrances by Duchaufour and in Sequoia. I can't recall Harissa immediately to mind; it's been a long while since Iast I tried it (used to have a bottle and sold it), but I'll see if I can dig a sample up. A vague memory suggest that one would probably find echoes of the others in Harissa. Duchafour is a really talented perfumer. Don't know much about him. I sure would like to read some kind of biography on him though.

    It's funny how skin chemistry works; on me Bois d'Ombrie becomes a smooth sailing dream of fragrance; whereas, many of the other aforementioned creations maintain their rough edges and acidic vinegariness on my skin.

    You wouldn't think it, but I have found Bois d'Ombrie works very well in hot humid whether, which tends to round it out and also extend it's diffusivity.

    scentemental
    Last edited by scentemental; 15th October 2007 at 09:19 PM.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post

    Most definitely Mike. There's a sharp woody aroma chemical that shows up in the GdG incense fragrances by Duchaufour and in Sequoia. I can't recall Harissa immediately to mind; it's been a long while since Iast I tried it (used to have a bottle and sold it), but I'll see if I can dig a sample up. A vague memory suggest that one would probably find echoes of the others in Harissa. Duchafour is a really talented perfumer. Don't know much about him. I sure would like to read some kind of biography on him though.

    It's funny how skin chemistry works; on me Bois d'Ombrie becomes a smooth sailing dream of fragrance; whereas, many of the other aforementioned creations maintain their rough edges and acidic vinegariness on my skin.

    You wouldn't think it, but I have found Bois d'Ombrie works very well in hot humid whether, which tends to round it out and also extend it's diffusivity.

    scentemental
    Okay - thanks for confirming this. I swear, I got deja vu the past few days when I wore all of these.

    It just seemed like a total aligning of the planets, when I started to test these scents and then I read your post last week coincidentally at the same time. It was quite a nice surprise to be wearing these scents specifically for the purpose of seeking out Mr. Duchaufour's 'signature' style. And like you said, the sharp woody aromas were there each time.

    I don't know about him personally either. This style of 'impressions' that bleed from one work of art over to another reminds me of the paintings of Jasper Johns. Great stuff!

    Also, the Harissa accord that differentiates it from the others is the hot red pepper at the top (probably the best use of red pepper this side of Piment Brulant by L'Artisan...yet another Bertrand Duchaufour scent) and the tomato leaf at the drydown.

    I will also add that Sequoia revealed in its second full wearing to me, a medicinal / eucalpytus accord that turned me off slightly to it. Which is fine by me, since my boyfriend loves it and will use the rest of the bottle. But when I got to the middle notes, I almost immediately felt a strong association with Pomegranate Noir by Jo Malone. Does anyone else see the similarity? It seems as if Jo Malone copied the middle notes of Sequoia - note for note. Quite tacky, if you ask me...someone call Chandler Burr!!!
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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Eau d'Italie

    I have 3 samples ( Eau, Ombrie and Paestum.)
    If someone likes try, PM! :-)
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    Just to show you how skin chemistry is different, I got to try the Bois d'Ombrie and the Sienne l'Hiver at Jock's house. Those two and then the CDG 8 88 I wore on my hands and wrist. Off the bat,the CDG smelled best with the Sienne l'Hiver #2. On me, the Bois d'Ombrie had a bit of a charcoal-like smell, not distracting but I did not get the whiskey or heavy incense out of it (though Barry sprayed some Montale scent on him and I COULD detect whiskey - heck, you wear that and get pulled over, they ARE going to give you a breathalyzer).

    Anyway, after a couple of hours, the Sienne l'Hiver was still as strong as it was after 30 minutes and rounded out. Barry told me to spray some of the CDG on my neck as I kept bringing my nose to my face to smell it. Wife felt that the CDG went a bit powdery but she preferred the Sienne l'Hiver . Id be inclined to agree, but costs factors in. CDG for 1.7 ounces is around $105 I think, and the Sienne l'Hiver for 3.4 is about $120.00. Since it projects more after 2 hours, Id be inclined to get that over the CDG.

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