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  1. #1

    Default Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    After the thread with the pictures of everyone's enviable refrigerator collections, I was also inspired to put my, in comparison with only 20 some, humble collection in the the refrigerator (who needs food?) as well ... It could be my *complete* imagination but the first blast of fragrance has across the board been more intense and more satisfying than when kept at room temperature. Fragrances which I love but with which I've had longevity issues now seem more intense initially (such as Td'H, Black XS and CdeG Vettiveru) and have seemed to have more staying power on my skin. Perhaps it has something to do with the more dramatic temperature change once applied to warm skin... whatever the case, I'm very happy I moved the cold cuts out of the drawer and crammed my stash in there instead. I highly recommend this as it's made a big difference in the whole experience. The added bonus of the crisp cold initial blast is icing on the cake.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I don't know about longevity, but I too find most fragrances smell nicer initially when refrigerated, with the exception of the Orange Vertes. I know it's heresy to Some around here, but that's how I do's it...
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I would keep them in the fridge but I don't because.....I live on the 3rd floor of my parents home (doing post secondary, trying to save money), and the fridge is on the 2nd floor in the kitchen. When I get out of the bathroom in the morning, I hate going downstairs, into the fridge (moving the watermelon and eggs out of place) just to apply my SOTD then run back up, bit inconvenient.

    I could keep a portion in the fridge and have the ones I use more often in my closet, but I have a very tiny collection, I wear them all frequently.
    Last edited by nsamadi; 13th October 2007 at 06:04 AM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Well now that GICaesar has mentioned that some find it heresy to do so, I've been looking around to find other opinions. It seems similar to coffee or wine or any "fine" acquisition... the opinions vary a great deal. I was just reading a REALLY long thread on Now Smell This and someone quoted LeLabo (famous for giving their fragrances a one year only shelf life) as saying refrigeration is best for long term storage. I guess I should have titled this thread "Refrigeration... thoughts?" I still stand by my original statement though I wouldn't dream of putting my coffee in the fridge because of moisture. Other opinions welcome I also just read on Sephora's website that, according to their fragrance expert, refrigeration does not extend the life of a fragrance and that it will actually disrupt the delicate balance of oils in perfume and eau de parfum concentrations. They -- also -- say that if stored out of light at room temperature, a fragrance will last 6 months to a year (seems absurd), so who knows? I might be making room for the eggs again after all.
    Last edited by nthny; 13th October 2007 at 06:26 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I'm not an expert on this subject, but I asked a Guerlain manager who told me that putting fragrances in the fridge can actuallly damage the juice and create a sediment. They suggested normal room temperature outside of light as the best storing.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Guerlain View Post
    I'm not an expert on this subject, but I asked a Guerlain manager who told me that putting fragrances in the fridge can actuallly damage the juice and create a sediment. They suggested normal room temperature outside of light as the best storing.

    We are talking what here...a temperature difference of say, 25F from ambient room temp to refrigerator storage? That assumes a refrigerator constant temp of about 50-55F and not as blastingly cold as it could be set to and an ambient room temp that averages about 75-80F degrees.

    My understanding of the volatiles in fragrance is that the colder the temperature, within reason, the less unwanted chemical reaction will take place and less volatility of components such as alcohol, which should only expend itself as a carrier upon spray, splash or roll-on, and not unduly into increasingly larger volumes of captive air in the container of the juice as the fragrance level is lowered with use.

    It seems to me that cold storage should enhance quality preservation by slowing down heat induced chemical breakdown of components. And any precipitates from that cold should reenter solution when the juice is warmed/shaken.

    Any thoughts?
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  7. #7

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Guerlain View Post
    I'm not an expert on this subject, but I asked a Guerlain manager who told me that putting fragrances in the fridge can actuallly damage the juice and create a sediment. They suggested normal room temperature outside of light as the best storing.
    I'm not an expert or chemist, but as kbe said, it's normal when you have something dissolved in something else (ie fragrance oils dissolved in alcohol) that when you lower the temperature, it lowers the amount of solute (the oils) that the solvent (in this case the alcohol) can have dissolved in it - that creates sediment as the undissolved substance solidify. But then, when you raise the temperature again, the alcohol is more capable of dissolving more oil, and the sediment disappears.

    I've actually seen this process with some of my lutens. In the fridge a couple of them (particularly the Haute Concentrations) devellop a tiny it of powder on the bottom. Leave it out of the fridge for a few minutes and it's gone.

    All I can say is that most of my collection smells great being in the fridge, and since I started doing that I've never had a single fragrance gone bad, whereas before it did used to happen.

    I think when you have a zillion fragrances you need a fridge cause you're not using the bottles fast enough. But even if I only had three bottles I'd still refrigerate them I just like them that way
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  8. #8

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I think you should put them in a fridge, and set the fridge to 13-15 centigrade - which is not too far from what room temperature in central Europe used to be in the 19th century (17-18). I can't imagine constant 22-24 degrees being good for frags, much less storing them in a bathroom where taking a shower briefly pushes it up to 30 or more.

    I read about the half to one year shelf life in a perfume book as well (the otherwise very reliable H&R guide), but from empirical experience this is plain nonsense.
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    The Osmotheque House of Perfumes in Versailles (developed by Jean Kerleo - Jean Patou's nose for 30 years) recommends temperatures of approx. 50 f for most fragrances and 40 f for pure citrus. Osmotheque preserves many of the rarest fragrances in the world.

  10. #10

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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    As a solution composed sometimes of natural oils, good fragrances would seem to 'prefer' to be kept in a cool (10c) environment. I'm of the opinion that a dedicated wine cooler, which typically operates in that perfect 9-11c range, is the way to store fragrances. At a price of around $100 USD, it seems like cheap insurance against valuable colognes going rancid.

    As far as storing in a typical fridge (2-5c), when I received my first authentic Creed (GIT) I put it in the fridge overnight because I decided I didn't want my new prized frag to ever go bad.

    By morning when I went to wear it, the oils and fats (ambergris?) had congealed too much and wouldn't flow through the sprayer. The juice came out from the tube/nozzle junction and made a wonderful smelling mess all over my hands (which of course, I proceeded to wipe all over my neck and chest, not to waste a drop).

    Once I kept that GIT at room temperature the problem didn't repeat. This experience leads me to think that typical refrigeration temperatures are too low for fragrances, at least the top-shelf ones that have significant proportions of natural oils.

    I'm moving across country soon, but once I get settled I may invest in the aforementioned wine chiller and see how it works with my collection.

    We love our frags too much to let them die prematurely!
    Last edited by AceyMan; 13th October 2007 at 03:36 PM. Reason: typo, grammar

  11. #11

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Well, low temp is good to preserve your fragrance because it helps slow down the moleculer proces just like almost in any other things that you want to preserve, but bare in mind that just like a wine or some other foods, if you want to get the real taste of it, you have to bring it to the temperature where it functions best. Just like drinking a cold red wine, applying a cold fragrance doesn't work good. The reaction time of the upper, middle and lower notes does not function as they are synchronised on room temperature. because of sudden temp. difference upper and middle notes react faster because they have the tendancy of reacting faster. On the other hand the lower notes would react slower and because of that it would last longer. My advice would be; if you want to experience the opening and middle note phase of the fragrance, then you should bring the frahranc eto room temperetare before applying it, by taking it out the fridge like one hour before. But if you want that basenotes should last longer then no need to do that. Years ago I was able to test the fridge reaction of some fragrances. I had the time and the supply for that when I was involved in a cosmetic-fragrance shop, but now I don't have the time and supply for it. What I can remember is that some fragrances reacted rapidly on the opening phase but they were slow on the following phases and this made them last longer, but with some fragrances there was a bit gap between the phases and first you assume that it is done, but it was becoming alive again but slowly. I can remember that some fragrances smelt different than when they were kept in the room temperature. Depending on the alcohol and water amount ih the fragrance I don't advice to go lower than 50F/10C That is if you want to keep the fragrance for a very long time. Otherwise I would not advice to go lower than 60F/15C if you intend to use the fragrance time to time.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bytebuster View Post
    My advice would be; if you want to experience the opening and middle note phase of the fragrance, then you should bring the frahranc eto room temperetare before applying it, by taking it out the fridge like one hour before.
    That would defeat the purpose of keeping it in a fridg. You would be causing the frag to experience frequent and more intense temperature fluctuations which is probably almost as harmful as storing it exposed to light and/or heat. If you're that anal about experiencing the "proper" drydown, get some 3-5 ml atomizers, fill them with your frags, and keep them sitting out at room temperature while storing your full bottles in the fridg.

    If you're going to keep your frags in a fridg, keep the temp at 50-55 F, not the 38-45 temps in most food refrigerators. At that temp., I've never had a problem with my Creeds or any other frag having sediment and I've not been able to perceive any noticable change in the drydown.

    Keep in mind that any frag industry "expert" has a good reason for telling you that cold will damage the juice. If you're preserving it, it will most likely be longer before you buy more. They don't want that.
    Last edited by MadScientist; 13th October 2007 at 11:14 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bytebuster View Post
    Well, low temp is good to preserve your fragrance because it helps slow down the moleculer proces just like almost in any other things that you want to preserve, but bare in mind that just like a wine or some other foods, if you want to get the real taste of it, you have to bring it to the temperature where it functions best. Just like drinking a cold red wine, applying a cold fragrance doesn't work good. The reaction time of the upper, middle and lower notes does not function as they are synchronised on room temperature. because of sudden temp. difference upper and middle notes react faster because they have the tendancy of reacting faster. On the other hand the lower notes would react slower and because of that it would last longer. My advice would be; if you want to experience the opening and middle note phase of the fragrance, then you should bring the frahranc eto room temperetare before applying it, by taking it out the fridge like one hour before. But if you want that basenotes should last longer then no need to do that. Years ago I was able to test the fridge reaction of some fragrances. I had the time and the supply for that when I was involved in a cosmetic-fragrance shop, but now I don't have the time and supply for it. What I can remember is that some fragrances reacted rapidly on the opening phase but they were slow on the following phases and this made them last longer, but with some fragrances there was a bit gap between the phases and first you assume that it is done, but it was becoming alive again but slowly. I can remember that some fragrances smelt different than when they were kept in the room temperature. Depending on the alcohol and water amount ih the fragrance I don't advice to go lower than 50F/10C That is if you want to keep the fragrance for a very long time. Otherwise I would not advice to go lower than 60F/15C if you intend to use the fragrance time to time.

    I agree that frags kept at lower temperatures would tend to 'open up' slower, but once sprayed or rolled on the body/clothes the warmup time has to be almost instant, considering the large surface area of the sprayed juice in particular interacting with ambient room temps and normal body temperature. I would imagine no more than 10-15 seconds at most for it to acheive temperature parity with whatever it is on, discounting evaporative cooling from the alcohol going into vapor phase.
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  14. #14

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I side with the camp that feels it is best to keep fragrances at room temp in a dark place. If the fragrance was meant to be kept at fridge temps, the SA would be pulling it out of the fridge at the counter, place it in a transport styrofoam cooler so you could get it home and into it's proper environment. Also, most solutions are injured if they are cooled, warmed, then cooled and so on. As a long time lurker, I have read some many people rhetorically telling people to get their frags in the fridge. I know this is a huge mistake and therefore will not treat my coveted juices in this mannor. However, feel free to do what you want with yours.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    I side with the camp that feels it is best to keep fragrances at room temp in a dark place. If the fragrance was meant to be kept at fridge temps, the SA would be pulling it out of the fridge at the counter, place it in a transport styrofoam cooler so you could get it home and into it's proper environment. Also, most solutions are injured if they are cooled, warmed, then cooled and so on. As a long time lurker, I have read some many people rhetorically telling people to get their frags in the fridge. I know this is a huge mistake and therefore will not treat my coveted juices in this mannor. However, feel free to do what you want with yours.
    Well, Frederic Malle keeps their fragrances cooled in a fridge, but I guess that is just plain wrong now.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    I side with the camp that feels it is best to keep fragrances at room temp in a dark place. If the fragrance was meant to be kept at fridge temps, the SA would be pulling it out of the fridge at the counter, place it in a transport styrofoam cooler so you could get it home and into it's proper environment. Also, most solutions are injured if they are cooled, warmed, then cooled and so on. As a long time lurker, I have read some many people rhetorically telling people to get their frags in the fridge. I know this is a huge mistake and therefore will not treat my coveted juices in this mannor. However, feel free to do what you want with yours.

    I would bet money that the juice in an average 1/2 full spray bottle of fragrance, if taken from a fridge and used and replaced, would not drop even 5F degrees during that process, unless it was left out for minutes. As for it being a huge mistake to keep frags cold
    Last edited by kbe; 13th October 2007 at 10:26 PM.
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  17. #17

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Has Luca Turin said anything about this subject? Being a biophysicist I think he would have a more definitive opinion.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Well speaking of the SA's... they often pull the fragrances off of heated lighted display shelving so we can't go on how they are stored in the store.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by pluran View Post
    The Osmotheque House of Perfumes in Versailles (developed by Jean Kerleo - Jean Patou's nose for 30 years) recommends temperatures of approx. 50 f for most fragrances and 40 f for pure citrus. Osmotheque preserves many of the rarest fragrances in the world.

    A little more carefully reading and deliberate pondering over what is posted is really called for here.

    Pluran's point--since it needs to be spelled out--is that those charged with preserving the perfume heritage of the Western world, lead perfumers who would/should know a thing or two about fragrances, specify categorically that fragrances, for optimum shelf life, must be kept at the above mentioned temperatures. Furthermore,
    Osmotheque reduces the head space in the stored bottles every time some one is given a sample to study by filling the resultant air in the container with nitrogen.

    Now that's optimum conditions. It doesn't mean that if you don't store your fragrances under such conditions they'll all go bad. Some of them will, eventually, some of them won't. There are many factors that come into play, like benzophenone, for example, an additive which acts as a sunscreen and protects fragrances from light, but to suggest that storing fragrances in a refrigerator will harm the fragrances or that is not necessary is just plain misinformed. Speaking of just plain misinformed:

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    I side with the camp that feels it is best to keep fragrances at room temp in a dark place. If the fragrance was meant to be kept at fridge temps, the SA would be pulling it out of the fridge at the counter, place it in a transport styrofoam cooler so you could get it home and into it's proper environment. Also, most solutions are injured if they are cooled, warmed, then cooled and so on. As a long time lurker, I have read some many people rhetorically telling people to get their frags in the fridge. I know this is a huge mistake and therefore will not treat my coveted juices in this mannor. However, feel free to do what you want with yours.
    That's got to be the most naive thing I've read in a long while. Sorry, but your "scientific explanation" isn't far behind. The last people one should turn to for advice or enlightenment are people who sell fragrances. With rare exceptions, they are usually always misinformed or not informed.

    There are a number of long threads in which I and a number of other Basenoters cover this very topic in minute, excruciating detail. The search function really needs to be used more regularly before proffering homespun naive "truths" dressed up as a fact. There's a lot of sensible, informed discussion in the Basenotes archives. It's really a matter of looking before you leap.

    scentemental

    Last edited by scentemental; 15th October 2007 at 02:35 AM.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Hi everyone,
    I am worried about the fact of my fragrances decomposing, especially becasue I can't use them up in less than 3 or 4 years, and the wardrobe just keeps on growing. I actually have a little fridge conviniently placed in my room, however the highest temperature it is capable of doing is 4 to 6 degrees C°. Which I think is way to low, at least according to the_good_life, who recommends a temperature of 13 to 15 centigrade.
    Therefore my question is if I should put the fragrances in the fridge, or will the low temperatures actually damage my fragrances.
    Thanks beforehand for any help
    optimus
    =)

  21. #21

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    My humble opinion...

    Most of us actually use our fragrances, and aren't planning on storing rarities for decades, so does it really matter?

    If you have something rare, then I'd think you'd want to keep it somewhere dark and cool where it wouldn't be disturbed. Otherwise, if we're talking about stuff you use everyday, I wouldn't get all caught up in worrying about it.

    ps - if you do have something truly rare, I would consider donating it to the Osmotheque for proper storage....but I'm sure most of us wouldn't even have the opportunity to own something so precious.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by sofresh View Post
    My humble opinion...

    Most of us actually use our fragrances, and aren't planning on storing rarities for decades, so does it really matter?

    If you have something rare, then I'd think you'd want to keep it somewhere dark and cool where it wouldn't be disturbed. Otherwise, if we're talking about stuff you use everyday, I wouldn't get all caught up in worrying about it.

    ps - if you do have something truly rare, I would consider donating it to the Osmotheque for proper storage....but I'm sure most of us wouldn't even have the opportunity to own something so precious.
    No a bad general philosophy to hold to sofresh, and eminently sensible, but I tend to be a little more careful based on the experience of 30 years of owning fragrances and owning what some would consider far too many of them (over 500 at last count). There are definitely some brands that will deteriorate more quickly than others: Chanel, Annick Goutal, Amouage, Jean Patou are a few that come to mind, so special care needs to given to those fragrances. Fragrances that aren't boxed need special attention. Many niche fragrances that use delicate natural essences and tend not to use preservatives need special care.

    Also, chypres tend not to do as well as other fragrances. It's the oakmoss and the patchouli, two ingredients that need special attention and don't hold up well over long periods, especially with exposure to light. Lavender doesn't generally do as well. So while the "don't sweat the small stuff" works for most people, it's a different proposition if you have hundreds of fragrances and are a serious collector and aficiando, and there are many of those kinds of people on the board that need more considered, carefully differentiated information. What's the alternative dumb everything down to general principles? That will help some not others. I like to have all the facts at my disposal when making decisions; that's not a bad expectation to have. I try to post with that in mind also.

    scentemental
    Last edited by scentemental; 14th October 2007 at 05:42 PM.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by nthny View Post
    Well speaking of the SA's... they often pull the fragrances off of heated lighted display shelving so we can't go on how they are stored in the store.
    Also, its in their interest to make you think it'll only last a short time - that way you use it up really fast and buy a new one!

    I haven't read the detailed thread that scentimental is talking about (will search for it, unless someone wants to provide the link first) but I'd tend to agree with him - usually, one would only worry about a solution getting damaged if you were taking it to the freezing point or below. That's when actual structural and chemical changes take place. Cooling above that temperature just slows down the molecules.

    Since alcohol freezes at at somewhere around -115 celsius (depending on which kind of alcohol) it doesn't seem like a big worry! Though I guess the oils can freeze, and there's often water mixed in with the alcohol.
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  24. #24
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    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!


  25. #25

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Phew - life can be complicated...

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    No a bad general philosophy to hold to sofresh, and eminently sensible, but I tend to be a little more careful based on the experience of 30 years of owning fragrances and owning what some would consider far too many of them (over 500 at last count). There are definitely some brands that will deteriorate more quickly than others: Chanel, Annick Goutal, Amouage, Jean Patou are a few that come to mind, so special care needs to given to those fragrances. Fragrances that aren't boxed need special attention. Many niche fragrances that use delicate natural essences and tend not to use preservatives need special care.

    Also, chypres tend not to do as well as other fragrances. It's the oakmoss and the patchouli, two ingredients that need special attention and don't hold up well over long periods, especially with exposure to light. Lavender doesn't generally do as well. So while the "don't sweat the small stuff" works for most people, it's a different proposition if you have hundreds of fragrances and are a serious collector and aficiando, and there are many of those kinds of people on the board that need more considered, carefully differentiated information. What's the alternative dumb everything down to general principles? That will help some not others. I like to have all the facts at my disposal when making decisions; that's not a bad expectation to have. I try to post with that in mind also.

    scentemental

  26. #26

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Guerlain View Post
    Phew - life can be complicated...
    Or it can be simplistic by sticking to one designer and pretending that's all there is to fragrances.

    scentemental

  27. #27

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Stop that idiotic tone, please, Mr. Perfect. My remark was a friendly one.

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    Or it can be simplistic by sticking to one designer and pretending that's all there is to fragrances.

    scentemental

  28. #28

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    I'm a convinced fridge user for five years. I use a big household refridgerater at the lowest setting possible. Even this big fridge I bought for a fraction of the retail price on eBay.
    Due to the fact that it's completely full with fragrance bottles, the temperature is not under 10 degrees celsius throughout the year. In the sommer months when the room gets hot I regulate in regard to the conditions.

    The only problem is my collection has grown immensly over the last months and there's no chance to store everything the best way possible. I would need one or even two more household refridgeraters at the moment, so I have to choose which fragrances go in and which won't.

    I can't confirm about an improvement of longevity of a scent on skin, but it's possible some fragrances need some extra minutes to "awake", but that's nothing important at all, at least not to me.

    What I can confirm is a DEFINITE improvement in terms of quality. Yes! Take a bottle that is about to turn, which begins to smell off and rancid right in the fragile topnotes, put it for two weeks in the fridge and ideally leave it there, you won't believe the results. I have seen it dozens of times. Fragrances that smelled just off could be used like there never was a problem. Sure, it can also be that some bad juice has been lurking in the spray mechanism and the whole impression gets mixed up therefor, but I doubt it. My 100ml Yves Rocher bottle of Vanille Bourbon (bought on eBay) was horror, I recall thinking to myself "who can wear this?" horrible! After two weeks in the fridge and twenty sprays later, it's one of the finest vanillas out there and the bottle is still 98% full. I'm sure the seller sold it with the arguement that it has turned and can't be used anymore. This is just one example, I have seen it with dozens of other fragrances mainly bought on eBay: Parfum d'Habit, Ambre Précieux, an old Guerlain (vintage) Vetiver bottle, some citrus fragrances (they are the most fragile IMHO) and some 80's stuff.

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  29. #29

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by dr.creed View Post
    I'm a convinced fridge user for five years. I use a big household refridgerater at the lowest setting possible. Even this big fridge I bought for a fraction of the retail price on eBay.
    Due to the fact that it's completely full with fragrance bottles, the temperature is not under 10 degrees celsius throughout the year. In the sommer months when the room gets hot I regulate in regard to the conditions.

    The only problem is my collection has grown immensly over the last months and there's no chance to store everything the best way possible. I would need one or even two more household refridgeraters at the moment, so I have to choose which fragrances go in and which won't.

    I can't confirm about an improvement of longevity of a scent on skin, but it's possible some fragrances need some extra minutes to "awake", but that's nothing important at all, at least not to me.

    What I can confirm is a DEFINITE improvement in terms of quality. Yes! Take a bottle that is about to turn, which begins to smell off and rancid right in the fragile topnotes, put it for two weeks in the fridge and ideally leave it there, you won't believe the results. I have seen it dozens of times. Fragrances that smelled just off could be used like there never was a problem. Sure, it can also be that some bad juice has been lurking in the spray mechanism and the whole impression gets mixed up therefor, but I doubt it. My 100ml Yves Rocher bottle of Vanille Bourbon (bought on eBay) was horror, I recall thinking to myself "who can wear this?" horrible! After two weeks in the fridge and twenty sprays later, it's one of the finest vanillas out there and the bottle is still 98% full. I'm sure the seller sold it with the arguement that it has turned and can't be used anymore. This is just one example, I have seen it with dozens of other fragrances mainly bought on eBay: Parfum d'Habit, Ambre Précieux, an old Guerlain (vintage) Vetiver bottle, some citrus fragrances (they are the most fragile IMHO) and some 80's stuff.

    Q: Why did they go off in the first place?
    A: Wrong storage - wrong storage and wrong storage!
    As I said before, I don't claim to be an expert on this subject. According to http://www.fragrance.org/ what you say here is true, but only for cologne-concentration. To quote:

    "Is it true that fragrance can be kept in the refrigerator for a refresher pickup?

    Yes, but only colognes and toilet waters. Perfumes should not be exposed to extreme cold or heat because either may upset its delicate balance."

  30. #30

    Default Re: Gents, get those frags in the fridge!

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Guerlain View Post
    As I said before, I don't claim to be an expert on this subject. According to http://www.fragrance.org/ what you say here is true, but only for cologne-concentration. To quote:

    "Is it true that fragrance can be kept in the refrigerator for a refresher pickup?

    Yes, but only colognes and toilet waters. Perfumes should not be exposed to extreme cold or heat because either may upset its delicate balance."
    Yes I can confirm that. Pure perfume, extrait or essential oils don't belong in there. It's all about the alcohol.

    Then again I wouldn't mind putting a fragrance bottle with 80% vol. in the freezer as well. It can't freeze because of the high alcohol percentage. Even Vodka can be stored in the freezer and a lot just do so, but actually I think the freezer might be too cold for a EdT or EdC bottle. 10 to 15 degrees celsius or centigrade is ideal. I once asked myself how long would a brand new, fresh bought bottle survive when exposed in an african or american desert. Days? Weeks? There's a big temperature difference from night and day that sure has an immense effect ....
    decant sales:
    Crystal Flacon

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