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  1. #1

    Default Very well written article.

    Here's a link to an interesting article about the use of synthetics in perfumery. It isn't all doom and gloom, and shows an appreciation for the art of it all rather than just villainizing the entire industry.


    http://adbusters.org/the_magazine/67...nces_edge.html
    Top Five: Oud Wood, Aventus, Kyoto, Rose 31, Tam Dao

  2. #2

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    Quote Originally Posted by madvillain View Post
    Here's a link to an interesting article about the use of synthetics in perfumery. It isn't all doom and gloom, and shows an appreciation for the art of it all rather than just villainizing the entire industry.


    http://adbusters.org/the_magazine/67...nces_edge.html
    I always wondered what they wrote about in that magazine...


    thanks for the link!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    So the three classes of molecules are:

    Naturals

    Nature-identical

    Synthetics

    This is interesting:

    One independent perfumer – Andy Tauer, of the small, Zurich-based company Tauer Perfumes – told me why he doesn’t put too much stock in platitudes about natural materials: “Looking at the extraction processes involving boiling water or organic solvents, in a factory-like environment, I have to admit that the term ‘natural’ looses part of its attractiveness. These ‘natural’ extracts are man-made: what is left of our beloved lavender flowers after distillation and extraction of their oil is a pile of brownish junk, cooked to oblivion, by brutal men, but still called natural.”
    Last edited by zztopp; 14th November 2007 at 10:43 PM.
    -

  4. #4

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    I can't believe Rich Hippie writes that wishwash on their website!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp View Post
    So the three classes of molecules are:

    Naturals

    Nature-identical

    Synthetics

    This is interesting:

    One independent perfumer – Andy Tauer, of the small, Zurich-based company Tauer Perfumes – told me why he doesn’t put too much stock in platitudes about natural materials: “Looking at the extraction processes involving boiling water or organic solvents, in a factory-like environment, I have to admit that the term ‘natural’ looses part of its attractiveness. These ‘natural’ extracts are man-made: what is left of our beloved lavender flowers after distillation and extraction of their oil is a pile of brownish junk, cooked to oblivion, by brutal men, but still called natural.”
    I've made the distinction between these three groupings a number of times along with many of the points made in this excellent article. Of course, I was making such distinctions at the height of Creed mania and all the BS about Creed only using natural essences, blah, blah, blah. I was frequently attacked by many people, and many times by wikipedia trained hair splitters. My how the board has changed, and my how you've change zz.

    Finally, a well-researched, article that's not just a bunch of throw away bits of insider knowledge interspersed with forced flights of metaphorical hyperbole as one main press "perfume" critic is wont to do.

    Thanks for bring the article to our attention madvillain.

    scentemental

  6. #6

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp View Post
    Naturals

    Nature-identical

    Synthetics
    I have a few quibbles with that middle term. The term I've heard used for things such as vanillin and linalol is isolates, not "nature identical".
    Isolates are just that, isolated chemicals that exist in nature. Rose - and many other plants' - essential oil contains geraniol, so geraniol by itself can be considered an isolate.
    "Nature identical" is often used in scent bases and perfume oils to describe mixtures of various substances imitating natural substances through isolates and synthetics ( though some contain some natural component as well ).

  7. #7

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    Quote Originally Posted by Galamb_Borong View Post
    I have a few quibbles with that middle term. The term I've heard used for things such as vanillin and linalol is isolates, not "nature identical".
    Isolates are just that, isolated chemicals that exist in nature. Rose - and many other plants' - essential oil contains geraniol, so geraniol by itself can be considered an isolate.
    "Nature identical" is often used in scent bases and perfume oils to describe mixtures of various substances imitating natural substances through isolates and synthetics ( though some contain some natural component as well ).
    A further distinction needs to be made when discussing isolates.

    Isolates can be nature derived, that is isolated from the natural compounds in which they exist, through various extractive mechanical and chemical processes, or the same isolates can be chemically derived from a compound that has got nothing to do with the original natural compound in which the isolates exist. Some isolates can be derived from petrochemicals through chemicals processes. The difference between the nature derived isolates and the chemically derived non-nature derived isolates is a difference of purity. The latter being purer than the former. The paradox is that while the purer isolate gives perfumer consistency, the naturally derived isolates give them more nuanced effects because of the impurities that remain and that frequently add to the complexity of the scent profile that produces a more "natural" effect because of such impurities

    scentemental

    Last edited by scentemental; 15th November 2007 at 02:33 AM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    The paradox is that while the purer isolate gives perfumer consistency, the naturally derived isolates give them more nuanced effects because of the impurities that remain and that frequently add to the complexity of the scent profile that produces a more "natural" effect because of such impurities

    scentemental
    Makes sense .. embracing the imperfections of life make life perfect
    -

  9. #9

    Default Re: Very well written article.

    quite an article. I am a subscriber to AdBusters actually (it seems canadians and the brits are the only guys who possess good journalism these days). I can't wait until this issue comes and I can read it all again.

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