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  1. #1

    Question Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    I find wools and the synthetic wools used for the ribbing on cuffs of jackets cause colognes to last forever. The top notes may take 6-8+ hours to fade, and the drydown comes in tommorrow.

    Good for anyone who tends to like scents with similar profiles, also for people who want to smell different from others, as the subtle mixing of a fading drydown of one, mixed with new top notes of another is unique.

    I'm curious to know, if anyone knows through experience which fabrics or compounds (rubbers, etc) used in clothes/watches/etc. tend to hold scents for a long long time?

    Or even the chemistry behind why certain fabrics, like wool, or certain materials/compounds, like rubber, may hold scents/oils for a long or short time?

    Any responses, questions, answers, or otherwise welcomed & wanted

    Thanks. Peace.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    Wool and silk keep scents forever, but I find that the scents tend to blend on them, creating a fragrant aura mixed with airy or tobacco smell, depending on if you attend parties with lots of smokers in closed-room-clubs. I usually don't worry much about scarf or upper clothing smellin something unless I dub my scents directly on them.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    It only ever seems to stick to natural fibers for me - nothing synthetic (and for good reason - the fibers aren't porous) Never cotton, it seems (at least not for long b/c that usually ends up in the washer). I can smell Clive Christian X on my coat for weeks. I cant really, in all honesty, vouch for synthetic fibers b/c I dont have any. There are two schools of thought here, I suppose. One being that scent will cling longer to a natural fiber b/c it is porous. The other being that No, it will cling longer to a synthetic fiber b/c it is NOT porous - if scent gets into the pores of a fiber - the fiber is acting like a muffler against the scent.

    I dont know what Im saying here...do you?

    At any rate, I have dozens of cashmere scarves and each one is like a customed fragrance experience - all of the scents mingling with each other - they're quite fun. The ones with Tubereuse Criminelle on them are very intriguing.
    Last edited by MarkDavid; 8th January 2008 at 02:30 PM.
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  4. #4

    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    Quote Originally Posted by MarkDavid View Post
    There are two schools of thought here, I suppose. One being that scent will cling longer to a natural fiber b/c it is porous. The other being that No, it will cling longer to a synthetic fiber b/c it is NOT porous - if scent gets into the pores of a fiber - the fiber is acting like a muffler against the scent.

    I dont know what Im saying here...do you?
    Yes, this is very possible that porous traps more potential sillage, but IDK.

    I think I'll do some thorough research about the organic chemistry of odorants, volatile and non...and their interaction with surfaces/materials....

    ...I'm very very interested in this topic...

  5. #5

    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    Merino wool clothing, especially if you layer them.

  6. #6

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    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    If you want to hold the scent until the top notes burn off cut up a coffee filter and apply the scent. How well it transfers to your skin later varies with the scent.
    This also helps when you want to scent something like an overcoat. Just put it in the inside pocket (with a very light application of the scent).

  7. #7

    Default Re: Fabrics/materials that scent "sticks" too ?

    Scientifically, I believe it all depends on absorption and evaporation rates. This is all based upon assumptions, SO IT COULD ALL BE WRONG but I'll try to apply the mass transfer I've learnt at uni. FYI Volatile is a term relating simply to how fast something evaporates.

    With any frag theres obviously the alcohol and fragrance oils. Upon spraying on any surface, the alcohol will rapidly disperse and evaporate, along with trace amounts of the more volatile oils (or other ingredients) which will give the 'top notes' upon evaporation and exposure to air. This effectively leaves the oil on a surface, with the slow evaporation of the slightly more volatile fragrance oils giving the 'middle' notes and the main oil itself the 'base' notes.

    Cotton is notorious for 'breathing,' hence why you will get a big burst of fragrance and sillage for the first 30 mins if you spray a frag directly on it, or under it. This is probably due to the actual pores of the material being quite numerous and large, influencing the overall evaporation rate and rate of diffusion of alcohol / oil from your skin through the material.

    Wool obviously is a lot 'warmer' than cotton, meaning it allows less heat through. Therefore, reasonable assumptions would mean that fragrance oils will evaporate slower through a wool barrier. Your more natural wools (unbleached / un - chemically treated wool) will likely hold a scent for longer.

    Synthetics like your polyesters, elastaines, etc. all have lower heat conductivites, likely meaning smaller and less numerous pores. Also, they will not absorb as much of a fragrance as a cotton / wool material would, meaning more would stay on your skin without diffusing through the layer covering it. However they are not as absorbent at first as some of the more natural fabrics. Take a polyester / elastaine shirt and spray a fragrance on it; notice it runs down the shirt much moreso than a cotton shirt, rather than absorbing straight into it

    So ultimately, if your spraying directly onto a fabric, wool would absorb the oils without letting them evaporate as much as cotton, while synthetics would not absorb the oils as much as a natural fibre, meaning that frags *should* last longer if they are directly under that fabric.

    Again, I apoligise if all this is wrong, its simply based on what I've learnt at uni.
    Last edited by Anthony87; 12th January 2008 at 03:41 PM.

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