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  1. #1

    Default True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    I want to tell you about my experience with Eau Sauvage, and explain how I feel about this classic perfume.

    I bought a big bottle of Eau Sauvage without hesitation, after reading what users and critics said about the fragrance. But my first experience with it was not a happy one; my impression was that although it had a classic and lovely citric smell, there was something strange, weird in the middle notes and base notes. I couldn’t describe this weird note very well.

    After the initial experience, I decided to insist and not get rid of the bottle. It was only after 4 or 5 trials that I realized that the “undertaste” in Eau Sauvage was not really weird. It was just a human note. It was a primordial, savage, primitive note that was mixed with the citric scent, with supreme balance.

    This perfume is magical because it integrates two sides of the human nature seamlessly: the artistic, spiritual, controlled, rational, civilized side with the primitive, savage side. In my opinion, the perfect balance between these two opposites is what gives the fragrance greatness. When I wear it, I feel like I am a nicer, cleaner, even more beautiful person. And other people share my views. I wore it today at the school and 40% of the people with whom I interacted (4 out of 10) gave me compliments.

    Maybe I am being over-enthusiastic about this perfume, But we are all perfume lovers here, and I know that at least some of you will understand my passion.

    Lucius



    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 18th January 2008 at 08:56 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    I've always loved Eau Sauvage, haven't owned it in quite a long time and it never seemed to last on my skin.. I did buy a bottle of OP-Endless which did give me some of the Eau Sauvage experience. I'll be sure to trial it again and attempt the olfactory glimpse into the human note. I do believe our imaginations do fill in much of how we experience the world in general. If it feels like a literary event, then it is!! I have been tempted to buy some of this lovely citrus juice once again. Although, with all of the referances to Signoricci, I'd like to compare the two. Check out OP Endless from a perfumania and let me know what you think. It's not quite as sublime as Eau Sauvage, but still delish and great for someone on a budget.
    Last edited by JickyMan; 19th January 2008 at 02:51 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by LuciusVorenus View Post
    I want to tell you about my experience with Eau Sauvage, and explain how I feel about this classic perfume, my impression was that although it had a classic and lovely citric smell, there was something strange, weird in the middle notes and base notes. I couldn’t describe this weird note very well.
    That "something strange" note you refer to is jasmine. Jasmine is a weird beauty that can smell like something rotting, due to the indolic chemicals it contains. Google it.
    No one did "weird beauty" better than Edmond Roudnitska, he's the nose behind Eau Sauvage. His son Michel Roudnitska and one of his pupils Mona di Orio are keeping this tradition very much alive.

  4. #4

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Thanks for the info.....It is so good to be able to give names to the notes I detect.

    .

  5. #5

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Nice thoughts on Eau Sauvage. I love it in all varieties, but always understood the name literally, like the cooling freshness of mountain rivers in the summer. Within minutes these can turn into wild torrents after a thunderstorm.... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EjamuTbC89o

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggles View Post
    That "something strange" note you refer to is jasmine. Jasmine is a weird beauty that can smell like something rotting, due to the indolic chemicals it contains....
    Maybe my nose is weakening now, but talking of lifetime impressions: Jasmine, the flower, has nothing, absolutely nothing indolic to it. I do not know all the oils in existence. I have authentic Indian Jasmine oil (maybe a mix) from Bombay for perfume, and I went back to my mini - bottle of pure Sambac Jasmin oil. While they stay far behind the real flower - a lack of 'freshness' and intensity, somewhat rounder and heavier in smell - I cannot detect as much as a trace of something unpleasant in these oils. The amount of jasmine used in Eau Sauvage must be absolutely minimal anyway. To my knowledge neither ES Extrême nor ES Fraîcheur Cuir contain jasmine at all. And yet they have that inimitable fresh character.
    Lutens' A la Nuit, and Montale's Jasmine Full are true jasmine power, based on absolutes from Egyptian and Indian jasmine respectively. How come they don't smell 'indolic', I wonder ?
    Last edited by narcus; 19th January 2008 at 10:27 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  6. #6

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Jasmine? I think the note he may be reffering to smelled of the lovely civet note more than anything...does jasmine ever resemble civet? I smell that animalic note in here which I love....

  7. #7

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    I´m quite sure the "weird note" you are reffering to is called hedione:

    from boisdejasmin:

    "The effect of hedione (Firmenich tradename, also known as methyl dihydrojasmonate) on jasmine notes can be compared to a sunray hitting a flower. Given its ability to lend a radiant, warm quality to the floral notes, the perfume history of the last thirty years is incomplete without a discussion of hedione.

    Hedione combines remarkably well with various perfumery materials, and its first significant usage of 2% was seen in Christian Dior Eau Sauvage, created by Edmond Roudnitska in 1966. A layer of luminous jasmine against the backdrop of herbs, patchouli, woods and coumarin makes Eau Sauvage revolutionary in its ability to interpret floral notes in the domain of masculine perfumery. ... "

    Here´s another very nice review:

    http://nowsmellthis.blogharbor.com/b...19/594915.html

    IMHO, Eau Sauvage is a fantastic fragrance, not dated in the least!

  8. #8

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    To me it always seemed clear it was the cumin and basil - both of which have the tendency of smelling BO-ish (check out Eau d'Hermes). On my skin ES goes positively fecal (it smells great on my son). I like it on other people). I personally prefer Malle's Bigarrade Concentrée.
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  9. #9
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    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    I used a bottle of eau Sauvage as I would a cologne, for something that wouldn't last too long but was refreshing. ES has absolutely no longevity on my skin. It can actually be measured in minutes. On the other hand I tested Tom Fords Tobacco Vanilla these past couple of days and it lasts 24 hrs on my skin.

    As stated above where father and son must have slightly different skin types, skin is a major component to the experience of a fragrance. Some folks feel it's of minor importance or none at all. I believe along with different noses, skin type is just as important.

  10. #10

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by fredricktoo View Post
    I used a bottle of eau Sauvage as I would a cologne, for something that wouldn't last too long but was refreshing. ES has absolutely no longevity on my skin. It can actually be measured in minutes. On the other hand I tested Tom Fords Tobacco Vanilla these past couple of days and it lasts 24 hrs on my skin.

    As stated above where father and son must have slightly different skin types, skin is a major component to the experience of a fragrance. Some folks feel it's of minor importance or none at all. I believe along with different noses, skin type is just as important.
    You are certainly right, and skin is easily forgotten. When I am ill or at that period in my life when I took a lot of medicine, perfumes lost all their charm for me. I believe in shirt /Tshirt spraying, or inside my Jacket sleeves - and all in all I seem to get my colognes 'as they come'.
    Any comments on Eau Sauvage Fraîche Cuir ? My other ES are still nearly full, so I only tested FC. But it seems to be great!
    Last edited by narcus; 19th January 2008 at 03:38 PM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  11. #11

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggles View Post
    That "something strange" note you refer to is jasmine. Jasmine is a weird beauty that can smell like something rotting, due to the indolic chemicals it contains. No one did "weird beauty" better than Edmond Roudnitska, he's the nose behind Eau Sauvage. His son Michel Roudnitska and one of his pupils Mona di Orio are keeping this tradition very much alive.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pugsley_f5 View Post
    I think the note he may be reffering to smelled of the lovely civet note more than anything.
    Quote Originally Posted by sables View Post
    Hedione combines remarkably well with various perfumery materials, and its first significant usage of 2% was seen in Christian Dior Eau Sauvage, created by Edmond Roudnitska in 1966. A layer of luminous jasmine against the backdrop of herbs, patchouli, woods and coumarin makes Eau Sauvage revolutionary in its ability to interpret floral notes in the domain of masculine perfumery.
    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    To me it always seemed clear it was the cumin and basil - both of which have the tendency of smelling BO-ish (check out Eau d'Hermes).
    Reading Basenotes is like taking a college-level course on twentieth-century perfumery. I love the depth of information that everyone shares.

  12. #12

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    I think Sables was the one who got it right. It must be the effect of something "extra" added to the jasmine note.



    Quote Originally Posted by Advocate View Post
    Reading Basenotes is like taking a college-level course on twentieth-century perfumery. I love the depth of information that everyone shares.

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 19th January 2008 at 04:14 PM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Eau Sauvage was created by Edmond Roudnitska in 1966. 6 years later in 1972 the same grand master has created a more improved and longer lasting version of this gem. Its DIORELLA the best creation of Roudnitska as he said.
    Last edited by dalailama1; 19th October 2008 at 06:24 AM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by dalailama1 View Post
    Eau Sauvage was created by Edmond Roudnitska in 1966. 6 years later in 1972 the same grand master has created a more improved and longer lasting version of this gem. Its DIORELLA the best creation of Roudnitska as he said.
    Chandler Burr was just gushing about Diorella in today's NYTimes "T" Magazine. And Turin and Sanchez list it as one of their top feminine scents for men to wear.

    I've never smelled it, but I have (and like) Eau Sauvage.

    What do those who've smelled Diorella think about it as a man's fragrance? "Diorello," perhaps?

  15. #15

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    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by PhinClio View Post

    What do those who've smelled Diorella think about it as a man's fragrance? "Diorello," perhaps?
    Diorella is one my absolute favorites... I made a plea for everyone to try it in my SOTD post last week. It is 100% wearable buy a guy, and by todays standards if it were released by as a masculine no one would question it. It's considered a floral chypre, but I'd call it a (dry) fruit chypre. Take Pour Monsieur (original) and lump on a melon/peach accord to the top, and you'll be close to Diorella, except Diorella lasts forever on the skin.

    And yes, I love Eau Sauvage as well (and nearly every other Roudinitska creation, including Moustache and Eau d'Hermes). If you like ES, you'll probably like Moustache by Rochas.

  16. #16

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by LuciusVorenus View Post
    I want to tell you about my experience with Eau Sauvage, and explain how I feel about this classic perfume.

    I bought a big bottle of Eau Sauvage without hesitation, after reading what users and critics said about the fragrance. But my first experience with it was not a happy one; my impression was that although it had a classic and lovely citric smell, there was something strange, weird in the middle notes and base notes. I couldn’t describe this weird note very well.

    After the initial experience, I decided to insist and not get rid of the bottle. It was only after 4 or 5 trials that I realized that the “undertaste” in Eau Sauvage was not really weird. It was just a human note. It was a primordial, savage, primitive note that was mixed with the citric scent, with supreme balance.

    This perfume is magical because it integrates two sides of the human nature seamlessly: the artistic, spiritual, controlled, rational, civilized side with the primitive, savage side. In my opinion, the perfect balance between these two opposites is what gives the fragrance greatness. When I wear it, I feel like I am a nicer, cleaner, even more beautiful person. And other people share my views. I wore it today at the school and 40% of the people with whom I interacted (4 out of 10) gave me compliments.

    Maybe I am being over-enthusiastic about this perfume, But we are all perfume lovers here, and I know that at least some of you will understand my passion.

    Lucius



    .
    I mostly wear citrus based fragrances. Unlike my other citrus scents eau Sauvage has a nice citrus opening but then the "savage" side comes to the fore and it transforms its character to something animalic. Wear it with pride!
    Conscience is what hurts when everything else feels so good.

  17. #17

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Its very nice scent.....Personally, I prefer the Extreme version....I m the minority.
    "Burn their homes and churches.Then see if they will not laugh, sing and pray again.
    For when two of them meet anywhere in the world, see if they will not create a new Armenia."

    William Saroyan.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Using: Antaeus, The Dreamer, Eau Sauvage and Voyage d Hermes

    Wishing: Tuscan Soul by Ferragamo and Concentré d Orange Verte




    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  18. #18

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    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Eau Sauvage is great.....but Eau Sauvage Fraicheur Cuir is the daddy of this line....it is TRULY amazing. If you can find it, i highly highly recommend it.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by everso View Post
    Eau Sauvage is great.....but Eau Sauvage Fraicheur Cuir is the daddy of this line....it is TRULY amazing. If you can find it, i highly highly recommend it.
    I agree.

    ES never did it for me, but ESFC is really amazing. Wish it was easier to source here in Miami.

  20. #20

    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    I agree.

    ES never did it for me, but ESFC is really amazing.
    I'll put in another good word for Fraîcheur Cuir. I do like the original, but the almost-impossible-to-find Fraîcheur Cuir is beautiful - somehow it reminds me of the smell of old paper money (before it was replaced with plastic notes here in Australia).

  21. #21

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    Default Re: True Magic in a Perfume: Eau Sauvage

    Quote Originally Posted by everso View Post
    Eau Sauvage is great.....but Eau Sauvage Fraicheur Cuir is the daddy of this line....it is TRULY amazing. If you can find it, i highly highly recommend it.
    I was lucky enough to buy a bottle from a fellow BNer who picked up extras when in Europe, and I also give it a huge thumbs up... In case you're wondering (as I used to), the FC version is not very different from the original. I'd say they share about 90% DNA. The mid/base of FC is tweaked to give it spicier, leathery feel (though not a straight leather note). It also lasts substantially longer. I also love the box, on which side says 'fraicheur cuir' and then has the english translation on the other side 'leather freshness'. Too funny.

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