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  1. #1

    Default Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Do you have any scents that you wear that perhaps don't smell quite as appealing or approachable on a basic level, but are instead particularly interesting on an intellectual one? If so, what scents are they and approximately how often do you wear them?

    I'm imagining, purely as a thought exercise, a scent that through it's evolution parallels one's personal awakening (i.e. an olfactory bildungsroman), and the stages of the scent in my mind are more evocative of themes and ideas and while I can imagine the scent smelling good, I have a feeling the final impression it would leave on it's wearer is more one of curiosity and perhaps even awe or reverence of it's evolution, instead of a straightforward love of a particular stage.

    Anyways, what scents are more 'thinkers than sniffers? to you, and what are your wearing habits with these oddities?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Scents belong to the senses. I may wonder about their meaning and message, but my experience with them is primarily sensorial. If you apreciate them exclusively from an intellectual point of view, it becomes quite boring after some time.

    Pleasure is what we are after. Hedonists we all are. The intellectual stimulation is the bonus. The more intelligent you are, the bigger the bonus.

    Lucius

  3. #3

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Well, I probably gave the wrong impression. I don't fathom anyone wears a scent they don't enjoy on a primal, sensory level, simply because it's intellectually interesting (although I am sure many people have had that internal battle of wanting to actually enjoy something they find interesting.) But surely there are scents that fall more towards that end of the spectrum than the other.

    So let me rephrase the question then - what scents do you find most intellectually stimulating, and what about them makes them so?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Malle's L'Eau d'Hiver (Winter Water, sort of)... I can't imagine wearing it out to dinner, to a bar, to a club, to work, or even to go grocery shopping, but sitting at home doing nothing, it seems perfect, when i can just sit and sniff it's weird creamy texture. It's really hard to explain. It's not complex, but it goes on and just sticks, great sillage and lasting power but like a little white cloud hanging near the skin... it's VERY different. I generally like odd, intellectual fragrances, but this is a different level than even that. it's like, hmm... it's like... sweet pasty powder...
    Last edited by nthny; 23rd January 2008 at 06:34 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    horizon by laroche...im still trying to figure out whats going on there!

  6. #6

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Eau Sauvage is a very intellectual perfume in my opinion. I could easilly write a journal paper about it. And I am sure it would be accepted for publication.

    Here are my impressions about it:
    -------------------------------------
    I bought a big bottle of Eau Sauvage without hesitation, after reading what users and critics said about the fragrance. But my first experience with it was not a happy one; my impression was that although it had a classic and lovely citric smell, there was something strange, weird in the middle notes and base notes. I couldn’t describe this weird note very well.

    After the initial experience, I decided to insist and not get rid of the bottle. It was only after 4 or 5 trials that I realized that the animalic “undertaste” in Eau Sauvage was not really weird. It was just a human note. It was a primordial, savage, primitive note that was mixed with the citric scent, with supreme balance.

    This perfume is magical because it integrates two sides of the human nature seamlessly: the artistic, spiritual, controlled, rational, civilized side with the primitive, savage side. In my opinion, the perfect balance between these two opposites is what gives the fragrance greatness. When I wear it, I feel like I am a nicer, cleaner, even more beautiful person. And other people share my views. I wore it today at the school and 4 out of 10 people with whom I interacted gave me compliments.

    Maybe I am being over-enthusiastic about this perfume, But we are all perfume lovers here, and I know that at least some of you will understand my passion.

    --------------------------------------------

    Lucius

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 23rd January 2008 at 06:44 AM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Richard James EDT is an intellectual scent for me.
    It inspires poetry in me. I think because it has a HUGE variety of notes, and has olfactory layers that are both somehow primordial and contemporary. A lot to be understood and explored here.

    Penhaligon's Love Potion No.9 is also on the mark.
    There is something intellectually stimulating about this one - like the scent of fresh ink printed on glossy paper stock. Its distinctly British and a bit conservative, but also inspires creative or innovative new directions in me.
    Last edited by Sorcery of Scent; 23rd January 2008 at 07:27 AM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    L'Homme Sage by Divine is definately intellectual to me. It also happens to be one of my favourite scents. There's just something about it which puts me in a calm and relaxed state of mind where deep intellectual reasoning feels natural and easy. It's really hard to describe, but no doubt it's an extraordinary fragrance.
    Last edited by RichardK; 23rd January 2008 at 12:03 PM.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Great question. I don't think my initial answer is up to the task. I'll have to think more on it and on more scents.

    Right off I'd say Chanel No.19 qualifies. I think it is three scents in the course of the day--green, vetiver, and then deep rose. Each part of it catches me unaware at first and grabs my mind as I try to figure out what's in the scent, where it was, and how it's coming along. There's no shutting off the mental energy that the scent needs.

    There have to be more scents that do this in different ways for me.
    --Chris
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Mechant Loup -- when I can stand the concurrent melancholia it induces in me.

    Peggy: "Right now, we have to get to the mental institution. Something terrible has happened."
    Latrelle: "What?"
    Peggy: "Brother Boy has tried to kill himself. He jumped out of his bedroom window."
    Latrelle: "Isn't he only on the second floor?"
    Peggy: "Yes, but he hit his head on a lawn gnome."
    Fr. Sordid Lives: The Series
    *****
    "Live, live, live! Life is a banquet, and most poor suckers are starving to death."
    Auntie Mame
    [/B]

  11. #11
    Basenotes Institution
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    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    The entire CB I Hate Perfume line is intellectually stimulating. Even if you don't like the end reults.

    The scents are extremely evocative of childhood olfactory memories. So much so, that a few people find them disturbing or subversive (similar to a film that leaves one feeling sad or unsettling). Take one whiff of Burning Leaves and tell me you don't have atleast one childhood memory (camping, the holidays, etc) associated with this smell.

    I find them quite challenging, unique and intelligent. The only problem is the price point (his oils average about $55 for 15 ml and the water formulas are $55 for 100 ml ) and the longevity (really low).

    My favorites from the line:

    Black March
    Burning Leaves
    At the Beach 1966

    Luckyscent sells some of them, or you can buy them direct from: www.cbihateperfume.com

  12. #12

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Bois d'Iris. When I tested it, it felt like a door opening in my mind, and I found myself given to a meandering train of thought that ran nowhere in particular. Cold, beautiful and impossibly distant. The notes would olfactorily shapeshift if I "looked" too closely at them. I wonder if the feeling would continue with subsequent wearings.
    Behemoth cut a slice of pineapple, salted it, peppered it, ate it, and then tossed off a second glass of alcohol so dashingly that everyone applauded.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I have done goofy things like wearing Cuir de Rusie while reading Turgenev, Le Dandy while listening to Satie, Pour un Homme while watching film noir movies, Habit Rouge to a Stones concert (homage to Keith) and Floris No 89 while reading Ian Flemming and Dali to the recent Dali exhibit at LACMA. Not sure how "intellectual" any of that is, but it does seem to enrich the experience.
    Last edited by Oviatt; 23rd January 2008 at 05:15 PM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I second the CB-I Hate Perfumes Line. The first smell of Black March took me right into a memory of playing in the rain. I'd like to try out more of their line. The Comme des Garcons synthetics line looks like more a cerebral approach to fragrance as well or more like a vicarious experience. The Demeter Line looks to have affordable situational frags as well.

    (I could have sworn I just posted to this thread)
    Last edited by JickyMan; 23rd January 2008 at 05:04 PM.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    C&S No. 88 does it for me.
    You can pick your friends and you can pick your nose, but you can't wipe your friends under the couch.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    O71 and 53. I cant stand them, they make me feel a void in my stomach. However, they really are a trip and their notes evoke the coldness and artificiality of an office and the modern era. It is like dada art. CK Be is in my mind quite reminiscent of CdG and I really like its artificiality, its 90's aura, its ambivalence. I love the commercial of "My name is Johny Jonson"
    Habit rouge, M7 and Signoricci also fit the bill but in a different manner. Le labo and CB I Hate Perfume (as mentioned before) are also intellectually stimulating.
    What I also find interesting is contrasting houses like YSL, Bond and Penhaligons. Paris vs. New York vs. London.
    Last edited by irish; 23rd January 2008 at 05:25 PM.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by LuciusVorenus View Post
    The intellectual stimulation is the bonus. The more intelligent you are, the bigger the bonus.Lucius
    Lucius, dear friend - how do you know ?
    'Il mondo dei profumi č un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I find three scents to be intellectually stimulating, perhaps because they are uplifting; quite powerful in fact:

    C&S No 88
    CdG Sequoia
    Miller Harris Tangerine Vert

    TNMA
    "Why not seize the pleasure at once?"
    -- Jane Austen (Sun, and Mercury in Sagittarius)

  19. #19

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    My Comte de Lautremont resplendent in my black jeweled battle shorts.
    Your nostrils, which will dilate immesurably in unspeakable contentment, in motionless ecstasy, will ask nothing better for space, for they will be full of fragrance, as if perfumes and incense; for they will be glutted with complete happiness, like angels who dwell in the peace and magnificence of pleasent heaven.
    (From Maldoror by Comte de Lautreamont)

  20. #20

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I have to say today's wearing of Iquitos gave my brain cells a good spring cleaning.
    Are you not entertained??? Is this not why you are here??

  21. #21

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Once I read one basenotes that Noir Épices (Editions de Parfums Frédéric Malle) could be the fragrance of a literature professor. Since then this scent has "intellectual" qualities for me - but don't ask for a solid explanation...

  22. #22

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    SL Chypre Rouge. It was so odd I couldn't get it out of my head so had to go back and buy it. I almost never wear it...but I was captivated by its weirdness.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    For me traditional colognes with prominent rosemary, eucaliptus, basil, mint, neroli and uplifting citrus notes are the most brain stimulating. In other words, an intellectual stimulating perfume is quite the opposite of a sensual scent, i.e. a refreshing and mindclearing scent.

    Bye. W

  24. #24

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Most of the fascination with Basenotes is intellectual. The largest organ for fragrance is the brain. But, many fragrances have little intellectual interest and are happy being comfort scents that lift the body or emotions.

    Some that appeal to my intellect more are:

    Patou pour Homme - the development and changes are interesting
    Borneo 1834 - seems to wake up the intellect - adds fuel to the mind.
    L'Homme Sage - sort of bracing mental slap in the face

  25. #25

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Waldemar View Post
    For me traditional colognes with prominent rosemary, eucaliptus, basil, mint, neroli and uplifting citrus notes are the most brain stimulating. In other words, an intellectual stimulating perfume is quite the opposite of a sensual scent, i.e. a refreshing and mindclearing scent.

    Bye. W
    Waldemar, do you have any examples? sounds good!

  26. #26

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    The reasoning is this: The more intelligent you are, the more capable of interpreting and judging you are. The capacity to make analogies, comparisons, classifications, etc. depends on how smart you are. Therefore intelligent people will be more fully Intellectually Stimulated.

    I am very smart for a few things (high gmat score) but very dumb for others, if that's what you wanted to know. I think I am smart for perfumes. But I am new to the world of scents, and I feel the need to learn more. Being smart is not enough.

    Lucius.

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    Lucius, dear friend - how do you know ?

  27. #27

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Some examples:

    Eau du Coq (Guerlain)
    Acqua di Parma
    Acqua classica Borsari
    Armani pour homme
    Leonard pour homme
    Signoricci
    Roger & Gallet (I don't remember the exact name, but it is the "basic one"
    Eau de Cologne L'Occitane
    Jil sander for men (the one with the oblique instable bottle)
    Weleda Kölnisch Wasser
    With another, more modern twist, there was Shiseido Tactics
    The first Cerruti pour Homme
    Acqua di Selva


    Also the old 4711

  28. #28

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I have found scent to be primarily emotional and memory - I do not get intellectual stimulation from smelling them.

    For intellectual stimulation - try reading a book - about perfume!
    ===
    “… [I] recall thinking that the computer would never advance much further than this. Call me naďve, but I seemed to have underestimated the universal desire to sit in a hard plastic chair and stare at a screen until your eyes cross.” ~ David Sedaris

  29. #29

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    The entire CB I Hate Perfume line is intellectually stimulating. Even if you don't like the end reults.

    The scents are extremely evocative of childhood olfactory memories. So much so, that a few people find them disturbing or subversive (similar to a film that leaves one feeling sad or unsettling). Take one whiff of Burning Leaves and tell me you don't have atleast one childhood memory (camping, the holidays, etc) associated with this smell.

    I find them quite challenging, unique and intelligent. The only problem is the price point (his oils average about $55 for 15 ml and the water formulas are $55 for 100 ml ) and the longevity (really low).

    My favorites from the line:

    Black March
    Burning Leaves
    At the Beach 1966

    Luckyscent sells some of them, or you can buy them direct from: www.cbihateperfume.com
    I agree with you, Mike, about the intellectual stimulus of CBIHate Perfumes, except that I don't care for memory lane, either my own or other people's. Sometimes I read these decriptions of perfumes and wish I had never set eyes on them, other times it makes no odds because once the perfume is on my skin it becomes my own story. That story is the here and now. I relate to perfumes mostly on a sensory and abstract level, and stories or memories get in the way. Most of the descriptions are risible anyway.

    The complex perfumes are especially stimulating because they take me on a journey, and sometimes the same perfume a month later can change the route it takes and play with time and the previous memory of it. This I love.

    My favourite of the CBIs I have tried thus far is Winter 1972.
    About an hour ago I applied my first sampling of Quest by Neil Morris, and already I can tell you it is aptly named. I feel I have woken from a mental slumber and my mind is alive.
    Most of the fragrances I wear give me some mental as well as sensory stimulus, even the ones I wear for comfort. It's a question of degree, and those with dominant gourmand notes are at the bottom of the list. I can't say which notes are at the top, but that uncertainty, that ephemeral quality, is part of the appeal.
    Last edited by Sestra; 24th January 2008 at 04:07 PM.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Sensual qualities aside, two forms of intellectual stimulation come to mind... as some have mentioned, you have perfumes that induce thought in general - maybe putting you in a thoughtful or meditative frame of mind. So that probably answers the actual question of the thread, maybe. For me, almost any of my fragrances gives me a lift, and in doing so they may stimulate the brain!

    Then there are also perfumes which seem like an intellectual construct as much as they are a perfume. I would agree that some Comme Des Garcons fits in this category. And for me, Cumming always comes to mind - an utterly unique concept, very distinctive and clever, yet I don't want to wear it, so its appeal is purely intellectual, which isn't enough to get me to buy it. I even find that Creeds are like this - totally impressive, stellar ingredients, ingenious, but I just don't get excited enough to buy it.

  31. #31

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Definitely The Dreamer by Versace. The scent is so complex, it can be a bit unnerving to wear casually. You really need to sit down and study its character to understand it.

    Teddius

  32. #32

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by Indiscreet View Post
    SL Chypre Rouge. It was so odd I couldn't get it out of my head so had to go back and buy it. I almost never wear it...but I was captivated by its weirdness.
    I feel the same way about Chypre Rouge.

    I've seen L'Homme Sage mentioned a few times, and I have to say that it effects me the same way. It's very bracing to me, I don't feel like I can "settle down" with it, even though it interests me.

  33. #33

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    Lucius, dear friend - how do you know ?
    Ouch, that's gonna leave a mark

  34. #34

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    Quote Originally Posted by nthny View Post
    Malle's L'Eau d'Hiver (Winter Water, sort of)... I can't imagine wearing it out to dinner, to a bar, to a club, to work, or even to go grocery shopping, but sitting at home doing nothing, it seems perfect, when i can just sit and sniff it's weird creamy texture. It's really hard to explain. It's not complex, but it goes on and just sticks, great sillage and lasting power but like a little white cloud hanging near the skin... it's VERY different. I generally like odd, intellectual fragrances, but this is a different level than even that. it's like, hmm... it's like... sweet pasty powder...
    L'eau d'hiver is the one. Simple and complex, dreamy and rational.
    "PLAIN LIVING, HIGH THINKING" O.W., De Profundis
    Real beauty: 1) Frederic Malle 1-20 2) Chanel Egoiste 3) YSL Opium pour Homme edp 4) TF Noir de Noir

    Noses: 1) Jacques Cavallier 2) Maurice Roucel

  35. #35

    Default Re: Worn primarily for intellectual stimulation?

    I find when I am pushed out of my comfort zone, I am forced to think and smell more deeply. For instance, when I choose fragrance simply because I enjoy the way it smells, I often take it for granted. I stop at enjoyment. Also, I find that when a fragrance is masculine, it limits my experience. However, if I put on some traditionally women's scents, I often think more about the scent, how it makes me feel, does it work on my skin. There are more variables to consider. Does this smell feminine? What does feminine smell like? Do I like the way it smells? Do I appreciate it for its composition? What does it remind me of, if anything? These questions often get sidetracked when I wear a scent that is less challenging in these ways.
    Last edited by bront82; 24th January 2008 at 06:46 PM.
    Oh please, if everyone around here is going to start telling the truth, I'm going to bed. - The House of Yes

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