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  1. #1

    Default A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    And by that I mean a whole lotta tuberose. I recently read a couple of articles on this most carnal of flowers and found them to be interesting enough to share.

    First, an article on various tuberose fragrances with comments by Luca Turin:

    Tuberose is a heady, sultry fragrance that promises to elicit big reactions.

    TUBEROSE, to paraphrase the perfume writer, Luca Turin, is a typhoon. The flower's fragrance can knock you off your feet. When it's extracted into an absolute and inserted into a chemical compound called perfume, it will blow your mind.

    There's nothing halfway about its waxy, rubbery, deeply disturbing smell. And there are no half-hearted reactions to it.

    Tuberose signifies death, danger and pleasure. It's slippery and ragged, glamorous and wild beyond measure, with not a skerrick of modesty. It's the Francisco Goya of fragrance, like reading Charles Baudelaire or drinking aged sauternes.

    Roja Dove, a British perfume specialist, noted in The Independent newspaper that, "Tuberose is the most carnal of the floral notes. It smells like very, very hot flesh after you've had sex - that's the bottom line."

    Faced with its dangerous, pulsing character, most perfumes tame tuberose. Gardenias, jasmine and sandalwood are good pairings to smooth it out. Jardins de Bagatelle from Guerlain, Estee Lauder's Private collection Tuberose-Gardenia, and Michael Kors are marriages of the soothing kind.

    My favourite local fragrance designer, Jaye Niemi (she does candles and home fragrances, not perfume), has a tuberose and sandalwood combination that still lets the eros of tuberose run free.

    Tuberose's eroticism is being harnessed in a new run of interpretations. Prada launched Tubereuse No 6, the sixth in its exclusive Artisan Collection, late last year. It's an abstract, palimpsest of tuberose, an aching memory more than a pulsing reality.

    In keeping with the tuberose trend, uber niche perfumer Pierre Guillaume at the tiny Parfumerie Generale in Paris has created one he calls it PG17 and released it last year, too.

    Even the big name perfume houses are getting dirty with tuberose. This year, to celebrate its 60th anniversary, Christian Dior is releasing La Collection Particuliere. The exclusive trio, only available at CD boutiques overseas, includes Passage No. 9, a tuberose softened by jasmine, patchouli and vanilla.

    I have one of those skins that can stand the intense contradiction of tuberose as a soliflore, a single-note floral scent. Even so, I have to consider how to wear tuberose or tubereuse (it often appears in its French spelling in the name of perfumes).

    In summer, heady concoctions work. L'Artisan Parfumeur Tubereuse has a jungle tang with a lick of coconut and a balancing bitter note. The Michael Kors version is gentler, with an incense note.

    Estee Lauder's Tuberose Gardenia is a radiant version that has women stopping me in the street. Jo Malone's Tuberose is the full blown flower in the heat of the day, sultry and sweet.

    Creed's Tubereuse Indiana is trans-seasonal, tempering the power of the flower with dry, briny breezes. The delicate Do Son by Diptych has watery notes and a green-orange bite. Spring is Jardins de Bagatelle, silky with white flowers.

    In winter, think icy, cool inkiness. Serge Luten's Tubereuse Criminelle or Robert Picquet's Fracas are when tuberose smells chilly and glamorous.
    Fracas, launched in 1948, is the diva of tuberose perfumes. "Every person making a tuberose fragrance is trying to knock off the classic, which is Fracas," says Frederic Malle, talking about his own tuberose scent, Carnal Flower.

    Carnal Flower was released by Frederic Malle Editions de Parfums three years ago. Its creator, Dominique Ropion, reportedly spent more than two years perfecting the formula, and it is said to have the highest concentration of tuberose of any perfume.

    The oil is extracted from the Polianthes tuberose flower, radiant white blossoms from a night-blooming member of the lily family (Amaryllidaceae). The extract is said to be among the most expensive in the world.

    The reaction of Luca Turin, the iconoclastic perfume writer, to one tuberose oil extract was to describe the smell as, "The rubber is kinky, dusted with talcum. Then an almost meaty blood-like smell reminiscent of carnations, and finally a 'white flower'." Wear it and be prepared for stormy weather.

    http://www.smh.com.au/news/beauty/bl...025055090.html

    A second article on tuberose appears in the latest issue of Allure (Feb 2008, pg. 116). Yes, its Malle's FRAGRANCE GUY column titled "Passion Flower". It has a subsection titled "Following the scent" where he mentions the following facts:

    1)Tuberose is the most expensive flower - costing around $8000 a pound.

    2) In the early 1900's the only way to obtain tuberose was via enfleurage - hence many perfumes from that era don't use tuberose in a large quantity.

    3) By the 1920s, perfumers had the capability to extract the absolute resulting in tuberose dominant fragrances.

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Do you have any favorite tuberose fragrances?

    Has anyone tried Parfumerie Generale's PG17 ?
    Last edited by zztopp; 24th January 2008 at 07:39 PM.
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  2. #2

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Jovan Musk for men reminds me of rubber too, mixed with something medicinal.

    Why would someone want to smell like rubber?


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  3. #3
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    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Wonderful zz - thanks for posting the article.

    Funny, Ruggles and I have been PM'ing each other back and forth with lot's of talk about tuberose. It's definitely on our 'radar.'

    Personally, I have never smelled a rubbery tuberose. But having read a few of the womens threads on Basenotes I know that many others do smell rubber.

    As I told Ruggles, I recommend you head straight for the Estee Lauder counter in either Saks or Neiman Marcus (since not all Lauder counters carry it) and ask to smell the parfum version of Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia by Estee Lauder. The scent's mentioned above, however I am sure he's speaking about the EdP, NOT the parfum. The parfum is much more feral, indolic and carnal.

    I just smelled L'Artisan Tubereuse last night for the 1st time, and unlike everyone else's 'buttery' descriptions, I get more of a fizzy ginger-ale kick to it in the top notes that was followed by a creamy wood drydown reminiscent (strangely) of Tom Ford Extreme. No lie.

    Fans of Black Orchd by Tom Ford, should try the other scent in the line, Black Orchid Voile de Fleur. Black Orchid with the decomposed truffle note removed and arranged with white flower notes. It, though, is not as masculine as the original Black Orchid.

    Finally, I recommend you smell Fracas zz. Tt's a love/hate scent (I don't like it) , but it's up there with Poison by Dior, Opium by YSL or Joy by Patou...as a Big Floral.
    Last edited by mikeperez23; 24th January 2008 at 08:10 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp View Post
    Do you have any favorite tuberose fragrances?

    Has anyone tried Parfumerie Generale's PG17 ?
    My absolute favorite so far is L'Artisan Parfumeur Tubereuse, followed closely by Annick Goutal's Gardenia Passion and Fracas.
    Today I tried Estee Lauder Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia EdP and felt it to be a bit too perfect, and in its dry down it's almost as much about jasmine as it is about tuberose. Can't wait to try the Prafum. Thanks for the tip MP.
    I have not tried PG17 yet, but I'm chomping at the bit!
    --------------------------------------
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Personally, I have never smelled a rubbery tuberose. But having read a few of the womens threads on Basenotes I know that many others do smell rubber.
    I think it is more of a very oily wax smell rather than a rubber smell, myself.
    Last edited by Kevin Guyer; 24th January 2008 at 08:07 PM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  5. #5

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Wonderful zz - thanks for posting the article.

    Funny, Ruggles and I have been PM'ing each other back and forth with lot's of talk about tuberose. It's definitely on our 'radar.'

    Personally, I have never smelled a rubbery tuberose. But having read a few of the womens threads on Basenotes I know that many others do smell rubber.

    As I told Ruggles, I recommend you head straight for the Estee Lauder counter in either Saks or Neiman Marcus (since not all Lauder counters carry it) and ask to smell the parfum version of Private Collection Tuberose Gardenia by Estee Lauder. The scent's mentioned above, however I am sure he's speaking about the EdP, NOT the parfum. The parfum is much more feral, indolic and carnal.

    I just smelled L'Artisan Tubereuse last night for the 1st time, and unlike everyone else's 'buttery' descriptions, I get more of a fizzy ginger-ale kick to it in the top notes that was followed by a creamy wood drydown reminiscent (strangely) of Tom Ford Extreme. No lie.

    Fans of Black Orchd by Tom Ford, should try the other scent in the line, Black Orchid Voile de Fleur. Black Orchid with the decomposed truffle note removed and arranged with white flower notes. It

    Finally, I recommend you smell Fracas zz. Tt's a love/hate scent (I don't like it) , but it's up there with Poison by Dior, Opium by YSL or Joy by Patou...as a Big Floral.
    Mike, thanks. I was on a tuberose kick a few months ago and discovered some faves. Fracas was just too loud and floral for me - too diva like. I haven't tried the EL Private Collection. Creed's Tuberose Indiana is one of the few which does smell like rubber (very alluring to my nose!), but the drydown is quite strange and maybe too feminie for me - too dame like. MPG tuberose has a green and musky feel which comes off a bit unisex.

    In the end I settled for the eucalyptus and coconut infused rich tuberose heart of Carnal Flower which to my nose is the perfect tuberose fragrance for men.
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  6. #6

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Thanks for sharing ZZ. Excellent thread. Tuberose is one of my favorite notes to smell on others as well as myself. For me, tuberose is less disturbing and more dizzying, dazzling, opulent, seductive and intoxicating. This holds especially true for my favorite, Maître Parfumeur et Gantier Tubereuse, in which the tuberose has a rich buttery aroma that smells almost good enough to eat.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggles View Post
    I think it is more of a very oily wax smell rather than a rubber smell, myself.
    I agree. I have yet to find a tuberose I would describe as "rubbery". I find most tuberose notes to be creamy and buttery. The oily wax smell as Ruggles mentions is apt as well.

    Parfums DelRae Amoureuse has a very prominent tuberose note that is blended exquisitely with jasmine, ginger lily, honey and sandalwood. Amoureuse is insanely beautiful, sexy and warm and my current favorite floral. I like it on me, but love it on others.

    Parfumerie Generale Tubereuse Couture is on my list to test. I have been impressed with the dozen or so PG scents I have tested and worn. Most all of them are unique, well crafted compositions and I am slowly testing my way through the line.

    Favorites include:
    Maître Parfumeur et Gantier Tubereuse
    Parfums DelRae Amoureuse
    Jo Malone Tuberose
    Editions de Parfums Malle Carnal Flower
    Creed Tubereuse Indiana
    Serge Lutens Cedre

    On My Test List:
    Profumum Tuberosa
    Parfumerie Generale Tubereuse Couture
    Renee Tuberose
    Caron Tubéreuse
    Miller Harris Noix de Tubereuse
    --------------------------------------
    Cursory notes from today's testing:

    Parfumerie Generale Tubereuse Couture opens with a tarry accord that I find intriguing and surreal as opposed to offensive. The oily, tarry note fades to obscurity after about an hour and ylang-ylang and tuberose become more evident. The tuberose is creamy but not as buttery as others I have smelled. Later, a sugar cane note provides a natural sweetness that blends beautifully with the creamy tuberose. A brilliant balancing act and choice of notes. Tubereuse Couture ranks alongside Querelle and Aomassai as my favorite offerings from Parfumerie Generale and I will likely buy a bottle soon.
    Notes: kalamanzi oil, green jasmin shoots, ylang-ylang, sugar cane, Indian tuberose, Sumatra benzoin and papyrus.


    Noix de Tubereuse from Miller Harris is a rich, voluptuous, sexy masterpiece. Similar to Tubereuse couture, it's not your garden variety tuberose fragrance. Tuberose is a featured player but it never dominates the scent as it does in many other tuberose scents. NdT also has an undercurrent sweetness throughout the heart and base that makes me wonder if it is a closeted gourmand rather than a potent floriental. Regardless, it's a complex scent that is more than a mix of tuberose and floral notes. Add another to list scents to buy in the near future. NdT is immediately among my favorite floral scents. It may eventually eclipse MPG Tubereuse as my favorite tuberose scent. For more detailed analysis: Ayala's excellent review.
    Top notes: Wild Green Clover, Mimosa
    Heart notes: Tuberose, Fig, Violet
    Base notes: Tonka Bean, Orris, Amber, Sandalwood, Incense, Coconut
    Last edited by Sloan; 28th January 2008 at 04:18 AM. Reason: Automerged Doublepost

  7. #7
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    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Quote Originally Posted by sloan_8013 View Post
    Parfumerie Generale Tubereuse Couture opens with a tarry accord that I find intriguing and surreal as opposed to offensive. The oily, tarry note fades to obscurity after about an hour and ylang-ylang and tuberose become more evident. The tuberose is creamy but not as buttery as others I have smelled. Later, a sugar cane note provides a natural sweetness that blends beautifully with the creamy tuberose. A brilliant balancing act and choice of notes. Tubereuse Couture ranks alongside Querelle and Aomassai as my favorite offerings from Parfumerie Generale and I will likely buy a bottle soon.
    Notes: kalamanzi oil, green jasmin shoots, ylang-ylang, sugar cane, Indian tuberose, Sumatra benzoin and papyrus.
    Michael Tuberose Couture sounds real nice.

    Is the dry down 'powdery'?
    "You are here to enable the Divine purpose of the Universe to unfold. That is how important you are."

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  8. #8

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Michael Tuberose Couture sounds real nice.

    Is the dry down 'powdery'?
    From what I recollect, the tuberose in Tubereuse Couture was slightly creamy and buttery rather than powdery. Surprisingly, the tuberose remained prominent even into the next morning as the sugar cane slightly faded. The tuberose note reminded me more of the tuberose in L'Artisan's Tubereuse. In addition, I could smell the tuberose several days later on the t-shirt I slept in the evening I tested the scent. I have never smelled a tuberose scent as dark and enigmatic as this one. I highly recommend testing this one.
    Last edited by Sloan; 8th February 2008 at 04:10 AM. Reason: seq

  9. #9

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    The most powdery tuberose I've ever smelled is Beyond Love from the By Kilian line. It starts buttery and creamy, but soon a distinctive green, almost fresh note appears. In the base it has ambergris and tonka. Beyond love shares more similarities with Carnal flower (without the peppery accord) than with sweeter, sugary tuberose fragrances as Tuberose Couture. Definitely worth a try if you like tuberose.

  10. #10

    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    I found Tubereuse Couture (PG) very fresh and green in start due to calamanzi (citrus) fruit oil and something synthetic fresh... Then - tuberose (and a I have to remind myself about a sillage by applying from the sample)
    The word I would link with it - Glamorous. Active, positive, bling-bling, nightclubs, etc... Very modern bling style. That`s for sure.
    And I believe - on a man it must smell as striking as a wooden bat
    Vetiver The Great!!!

  11. #11
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    Default Re: A rubbery, talcum, meaty fragrant typhoon

    I enjoy wearing Carnal Flower and Tubereuse Criminelle, which I'd place among the most wearable tuberose scents for men. Etat Libre d'Orange Vierges e Toreros is an interesting tuberose and leather concoction that would probably suit many men as well.

    Among my deepest tuberose disappointments are Creed's Tuberose Indiana, of which I once wrote "So where's the tuberose?" and the loathsome Fresh Hombre de Flores Polianthes Tuberosa. (No tuberose, lots of bubblegum.)

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