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  1. #1

    Default The Disappearing Note

    Have any of you ever put on a fragrance for the first or second time and strongly noticed a particular note, only to have it vanish on subsequent wearings?

    I'm wearing Andy Tauer's Lonestar Memories right now, and I remember that the first time I put it on, I immediately smelled the most exquisite jasmine accord. I LOVED it. Since then, I can barely detect any jasmine. I still think it's a great, bizarre fragrance, but I miss that jasmine!

    What do you think it is that causes a note to vanish to the nose like that?

  2. #2

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Quote Originally Posted by Maxwell View Post
    Have any of you ever put on a fragrance for the first or second time and strongly noticed a particular note, only to have it vanish on subsequent wearings?

    I'm wearing Andy Tauer's Lonestar Memories right now, and I remember that the first time I put it on, I immediately smelled the most exquisite jasmine accord. I LOVED it. Since then, I can barely detect any jasmine. I still think it's a great, bizarre fragrance, but I miss that jasmine!

    What do you think it is that causes a note to vanish to the nose like that?
    Happens all the time with me. I don't review many fragrances until I get a consistent result four or five times over a period of at least two months. I have reviews now of about twenty five fragrances that I won't submit because I know I don't have them pinned down yet. And even after I think I have them understood, I'm always finding something different, and losing something that I thought was there. I think the brain at first focuses on what it's most familiar with - it tries to get the "lay of the land," the brain, like every other living entity, likes to be in friendly, familiar territory. Then it starts seeking out the unfamiliar. One sniff doesn't give the brain time to adjust to all the variables in a lot of the fragrances. Some fragrances, though are very standardized and are very easy to figure out. Niche fragrances are much harder to understand than designers because designers, by their very nature, are more standardized and use more standardized production. Niches are more experimental and the have more unfamiliar elements and combinations.

    We don't smell with out noses, we smell with our brains.

    Another thing would be the difficulty of niche manufacturers to insure consistent quality of the ingredients involved in production.

    I also find that I get more consistent results when testing on paper -- apparently the temperature, the cleanliness, the acidity, etc. of the skin cause a lot of variation in the way the fragrance responds.

    Also, your mental state might perceive different things in different environments and circumstances.

    Also, I NEVER completely trust any of my reactions to fragrances when sniffing them in a typical perfume shop because there are just too many ambient smells around that interfere with with smelling process.
    Last edited by foetidus; 25th January 2008 at 10:24 PM. Reason: added thoughts

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Yes, absolutely. I think that the first impressions are the most reliable ones. When you use the perfume for a long time, you develop "resistance" to it. Just like what happens when you take a drug. Some of the notes become very familiar, and therefore stand out less.

    Lucius

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 25th January 2008 at 11:37 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Lonestar Memories is the first fragrance I've observed this phenomenon with. I mean, I'll notice certain notes a little more on different days with other fragrances, but the first time I sprayed Lonestar Memories, I got almost pure jasmine (with the birch tar accord). The fact that I can't smell the jasmine in it at all anymore amazes me.

    Foetidus: I think you might be right about the mind seeking the familiar. I wasn't familiar at all with Lonestar's birch tar notes prior to trying it, so perhaps I picked up on the jasmine first because of that. I just wish I could smell the jasmine in it again... it was amazing.
    Currently digging: Le Labo Rose 31 and Oud oils.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Quote Originally Posted by Maxwell View Post
    Lonestar Memories is the first fragrance I've observed this phenomenon with. I mean, I'll notice certain notes a little more on different days with other fragrances, but the first time I sprayed Lonestar Memories, I got almost pure jasmine (with the birch tar accord). The fact that I can't smell the jasmine in it at all anymore amazes me.

    Foetidus: I think you might be right about the mind seeking the familiar. I wasn't familiar at all with Lonestar's birch tar notes prior to trying it, so perhaps I picked up on the jasmine first because of that. I just wish I could smell the jasmine in it again... it was amazing.
    I understand about that birch tar note. The first time I met it - I think it was in Etro's Palais Jamais, I barely noticed it. It started getting more and more obvious the more often I smelled it. Now it's one of the first things I smell in a fragrance if it's there. As a matter of fact, Lonestar Memories is one of the fragrances I didn't review because between the birch tar and the leather, I can't adequately judge the other notes. The first time I smelled Lonestar Memories I smelled the jasmine, the carrot, and the sandalwood immediately. Now, birchtar and leather.

    I know what you mean by enjoying a jasmine note. Jasmine is my about my only favorite floral note and there are some good jasmine fragrances out there. You've probably tried them already, but if you haven't and you want to try an almost straight jasmine, try MPG's Jasmin and Lutens' A La Nuit --they are both excelllent.

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    I have this with Rose 31 - the rose disappears fairly regularly. Bummer.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Quote Originally Posted by foetidus View Post
    I understand about that birch tar note. The first time I met it - I think it was in Etro's Palais Jamais, I barely noticed it. It started getting more and more obvious the more often I smelled it. Now it's one of the first things I smell in a fragrance if it's there. As a matter of fact, Lonestar Memories is one of the fragrances I didn't review because between the birch tar and the leather, I can't adequately judge the other notes. The first time I smelled Lonestar Memories I smelled the jasmine, the carrot, and the sandalwood immediately. Now, birchtar and leather.

    I know what you mean by enjoying a jasmine note. Jasmine is my about my only favorite floral note and there are some good jasmine fragrances out there. You've probably tried them already, but if you haven't and you want to try an almost straight jasmine, try MPG's Jasmin and Lutens' A La Nuit --they are both excelllent.
    Interesting that the same thing would happen to you with the birth tar. There must be a particular way that this note/accord interacts with the nose that would make that happen.

    I love Luten's A La Nuit, but I haven't tried the MPG. Thanks for the recommendation.

    Mikey: That happens to me sometimes with Rose 31, but I actually notice the "animalic" basenote dissapearing more often now. When I first got Rose 31, I loved that weird animalic note it had, but now I mostly smell the woods and rose.
    Currently digging: Le Labo Rose 31 and Oud oils.

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Disappearing Note

    Quote Originally Posted by LuciusVorenus View Post
    Yes, absolutely. I think that the first impressions are the most reliable ones. When you use the perfume for a long time, you develop "resistance" to it. Just like what happens when you take a drug. Some of the notes become very familiar, and therefore stand out less.

    Lucius

    .
    Yes. 100% First impressiona are also what other people will smell on you, that haven't smelled that particular scent before.
    I can no longer smell a certain distinct Green Note I remember smelling in GIT the first few times I smelled it. But I know it's there.

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