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Thread: Perfume Storage

  1. #421

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    dresser drawer for me. and rest assured, i'm very elegant

  2. #422

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I was at a perfumer's store and he had a basket of clear bottled perfumes (that were for sale) just basking in the afternoon sun

  3. #423
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    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I think the same rules apply for fragrances as for wine: dark and cool, although frags should tolerate more abuse than wine.

  4. #424

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    In the closet...I try not to spray a bottle unless I'm going to wear it often. I believe that the scent starts changing once oxygen get's in!

  5. #425

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Great display & bottles PuddleMonkey!!

    I use to keep my fragrances in their boxes in a drawer, now I keep some of the prettier more regularly used ones on a cute tray on my dresser. I toss a cloth on them during the sunny part of the day. I just decided Im going to enjoy how they look since I had a few go bad on me even while stored away.

  6. #426
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    My experience as an anaerobic microbiologist makes certain that oxygen is omnipresent in our atmosphere. If you tested the liquid in a brand new bottle, you will find lots of oxygen. Unless the perfume was made anaerobic by infusion with anaerobic gases, and introduction of a reducing agent (typically foul smelling) the perfume will contain oxygen. If you wanted to keep oxygen out of your bottles, you would have to use them only inside an anaerobic chamber. Oxygen is in your bottles no matter what you do.

  7. #427

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by danho View Post
    My experience as an anaerobic microbiologist makes certain that oxygen is omnipresent in our atmosphere. If you tested the liquid in a brand new bottle, you will find lots of oxygen. Unless the perfume was made anaerobic by infusion with anaerobic gases, and introduction of a reducing agent (typically foul smelling) the perfume will contain oxygen. If you wanted to keep oxygen out of your bottles, you would have to use them only inside an anaerobic chamber. Oxygen is in your bottles no matter what you do.
    Undoubtedly that's quite correct, but a perfume isn't exactly like a microbe and keeping a perfume good isn't the same as trying to keep something anaerobic. More oxygen = faster ageing, less = slower ageing. Particularly where the perfume contains chemicals prone to oxidise such as most aldehydes and most citrus oils.

    So the less oxygen you expose it to the better. Aldehydes are routinely kept under a layer of nitrogen after manufacture and some perfume companies will fill the air-space in the bottle of a finished scent with nitrogen for the same reason. At home (if you can get into the bottle) you can use one of those sprays designed for wine to achieve a similar effect if you plan to keep a scent for a long time and it's precious to you.

    Neither method will result in a completely anaerobic environment but will still help keep a perfume good for longer.
    Chris Bartlett
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  8. #428

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I keep mine on a shelf in my closet. Hubby works night shift and sleeps during the day so the bedroom is always kept dark. I keep my boxes but I don't keep my perfumes in them.

  9. #429

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I keep my 'fumes in their original packaging, only taking them out when I want to spray. Some of my scents are stored in a small three-drawer chest by my bed, a few more in an old shoe-box on the floor, some in a drawer under my bed and others are just lying around. I don't obsess too much about storage. I've had a bottle of EA Green Tea for 10 years+. It came without a box, has been used and exposed to heat, light, etc., and still smells the same as on first spray. Not that I'm saying all frags will be this hardy, but I think some of them must be quite resilient. I guess the main thing is don't hoard, use!

  10. #430
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    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by 30 Roses View Post
    Mini fridge in the bedroom is what we use.
    Do you hear it? I don't like the sound of fridges, even small ones.

  11. #431

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Well I just finished building a custom cologne box that should give me plenty of space for now, as my collection is growing nicely








  12. #432

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Very nice! I have decided to build my own storage box as well. Probably will take me a while, but should be fun. Great job.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oupavoc View Post
    Well I just finished building a custom cologne box that should give me plenty of space for now, as my collection is growing nicely








  13. #433
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    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    ^^ Nice!
    * * * *

  14. #434

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oupavoc View Post
    Well I just finished building a custom cologne box that should give me plenty of space for now, as my collection is growing nicely







    Excellent work - I love it. I bet you end up making another one though - next step the perfume storage room . . .
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  15. #435

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Wow those are some awesome pics! I keep mine in a drawer/cabinet, not in plain sight.

    @Chris: I was wondering: if I have a half used bottle, should I decant it in smaller full bottles or not? I have some pretty old stuff, many naturals too and I have no idea what you mean by that 'wine blanket'? I sometimes just open bottles to take a good sniff

  16. #436

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I’ve found a gas spray for wine on Amazon that will show you the kind of thing I mean.

    To decant or not to decant . . . well I’m afraid the answer is ‘it depends’. If you are likely to keep the resulting full bottles unused for a long period (many months at least) then it’s probably worth decanting. If you are going to keep using from one smaller bottle and therefore end up with an air-space in that quite quickly then it probably isn’t: just like decanting wine, you’ll put air into the perfume when you decant it, which isn’t going to help retard it’s ageing so it’s a balance of risks.

    If your perfumes are very old - by which I mean 100 years or so - leave well alone as they are likely to be all or nearly all natural materials and they will probably age gracefully from here on anyway. If by old you mean you’ve had them for a decade or so, then they are likely to have a lot of synthetics, probably including aldehydes, some of which don’t age well at all then my advice above holds good.

    The main thing is to keep them dark and cool and it sounds like you’ve got that taped already.

    Opening the bottle just to take a good sniff is a really good idea: what would be the point of keeping them if you never smell them? However if you decide to use the wine spray idea, then you’d need to re-do it after each time you open the bottle. You don’t need to re-apply after each time you spray some though, assuming it’s in a conventional atomiser with a tube, because the liquid is being removed from the bottom and the protective gas should remain on top, at least for a few uses.

    Does that help?
    Last edited by Chris Bartlett; 20th December 2011 at 04:29 PM. Reason: corrected you’re to your . . . doh!
    Chris Bartlett
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  17. #437

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I keep mine in the original boxes in a dark and cool closet. Never had a problem. Although, that picture of the wine fridge is giving me some ideas. ;-)

  18. #438

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    I keep mine in breadboxes with tilt-up lids, much like this one (http://www.anchorhocking.com/images/...98949_zoom.jpg). it doesn't keep them pitch dark, but it at least keeps direct light away from them, and I can easily access many bottles just by opening a breadbox.

    It is a problem for taller bottles - I have to store them carefully in the very center of the breadbox where the "roof" is highest, or I just leave them on the shelf to fend for themselves.

  19. #439

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by ChickenFreak View Post
    I keep mine in breadboxes with tilt-up lids, much like this one (http://www.anchorhocking.com/images/...98949_zoom.jpg). it doesn't keep them pitch dark, but it at least keeps direct light away from them, and I can easily access many bottles just by opening a breadbox.

    It is a problem for taller bottles - I have to store them carefully in the very center of the breadbox where the "roof" is highest, or I just leave them on the shelf to fend for themselves.
    I used to use a wooded bread box there great storage until you run out of room which what happen to me

  20. #440

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Oupavoc View Post
    I used to use a wooded bread box there great storage until you run out of room which what happen to me
    I just buy another one. I'm up to three, plus a modest-sized fabric-covered box for decants and samples.

  21. #441

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    I’ve found a gas spray for wine on Amazon that will show you the kind of thing I mean.

    To decant or not to decant . . . well I’m afraid the answer is ‘it depends’. If you are likely to keep the resulting full bottles unused for a long period (many months at least) then it’s probably worth decanting. If you are going to keep using from one smaller bottle and therefore end up with an air-space in that quite quickly then it probably isn’t: just like decanting wine, you’ll put air into the perfume when you decant it, which isn’t going to help retard it’s ageing so it’s a balance of risks.

    If your perfumes are very old - by which I mean 100 years or so - leave well alone as they are likely to be all or nearly all natural materials and they will probably age gracefully from here on anyway. If by old you mean you’ve had them for a decade or so, then they are likely to have a lot of synthetics, probably including aldehydes, some of which don’t age well at all then my advice above holds good.

    The main thing is to keep them dark and cool and it sounds like you’ve got that taped already.

    Opening the bottle just to take a good sniff is a really good idea: what would be the point of keeping them if you never smell them? However if you decide to use the wine spray idea, then you’d need to re-do it after each time you open the bottle. You don’t need to re-apply after each time you spray some though, assuming it’s in a conventional atomiser with a tube, because the liquid is being removed from the bottom and the protective gas should remain on top, at least for a few uses.

    Does that help?
    Thank you Chris, that does help indeed How do you get that gas into a bottle with a 'crimped' sprayer?
    My collection varies between vintage (80 years old or so) and some new modern stuff like Chanels, Diors, Guerlains, Lauders etc. (I need to work on updating my wardrobe...) Like now I have a 1/3 used bottle of Tommy Girl that I was thinking of decanting as I don't wear it as much.

  22. #442

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Can anyone remember which basenoter originally posted this translation of some of Guy Robert's thoughts on storage?:
    http://forum.gazeta.pl/forum/w,15707..._ang_.html?v=2


    "When someone offers you a perfume, may you be lucky enough to receive a true
    parfum (instead of an eau) in a beautiful, large bottle. Chances are you will
    fall in love with it, and that you will want to replace it at some point. A
    valuable advise, in that case, is to purchase the smaller bottle. Depending
    on your perfume habits, a “half ounce” or “one ounce” will suffice. Larger
    volumes will obviously take many more months to finish; but while a well-made
    perfume can stand the test of time, age doesn't give it any interesting
    qualities either.

    Once you have opened the bottle, a light oxidation process takes place
    inside. If you forget to close the bottle after you have used the perfume,
    this will only speed up the process. The fresh, fleeting top notes of the
    fragrance will tend to “calm down” a bit; it’s true that this will not
    completely ruin the fragrance, but it will change the initial impression you
    get from your perfume. When the natural ingredients are derived from such
    noble raw materials as jasmin, orange blossom, jonquil, and rose, the colour
    will become slightly browner. Depending on the composition of the perfume, it
    can develop into a brownish-red within a few years. If it has a green teint,
    that green may become darker. This is normal, and it does not necessarily
    mean that the fragrance is deteriorated. However, when you purchase a new
    bottle of the same perfume, you may get the impression that they sold you a
    lighter, more fleeting fragrance. This phenomenon causes many customers to
    take their new bottle back to the store, claiming it is not the same; hence,
    manufacturers are asked on a regular basis to analyse and check recently
    purchased bottles in their laboratories.

    The ageing process is increased when you add light and heat. Don’t keep your
    perfume on the bathroom shelve, which is often located near a radiator: your
    interior decorator may say it looks fabulous, but it’s really the wrong place
    for perfumes. If, on top of that, you expose the bottle to direct sunlight,
    you have done all you can to kill the fragrance. Remember that the sun is a
    perfume’s greatest enemy.

    At the Osmothčque, the fragrance library in Versailles, classic and
    discontinued fragrances are kept in a cellar at a constant temperature, all
    through summer and winter. This cellar is completely dark; our perfume
    reserves are protected by means of argon, a gas heavier than air, which keeps
    the top of the bottles and jars inert. That way, the liquid does not come in
    contact with air.

    A new bottle of parfum of which the cap has not yet been removed (it's even
    better if the bottle was stored in its packaging) can be kept, depending on
    its composition, from fifteen to twenty years. Bare in mind, though, that
    perfumes with orange blossom, jonquil, and its derivates as their main
    ingredients will age faster and will turn red, while those composed around
    jasmin, rose, and iris will change less.

    In each perfume, some molecules react with others, and then transform rather
    quickly; these are usually chemical reactions between natural and synthetic
    elements, which can produce undesired esters. The only natural product which
    doesn’t age well is patchouli: two years after it has been mixed with other
    (natural or synthetic) products, chemical reactions transform its beautiful
    and rich scent in an inevitable “celluloid-like” odour. More and more
    perfumes contain patchouli nowadays; they do not necessarily become
    unwearable, but their character does change a little bit through time. "

    I keep my bottles in their original box and in a drawer, storage box or closet. A few are out for display at a time but I try to keep them out of sunlight. To me, the juice is more important than the luxury of looking at the beautiful bottles and having them at my fingertips, but that's just me. As far as refrigeration goes, I really don't know what to think anymore.
    Last edited by socalwoman; 2nd September 2012 at 12:55 PM.

  23. #443

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Quote Originally Posted by Lavender View Post
    Thank you Chris, that does help indeed How do you get that gas into a bottle with a 'crimped' sprayer?
    Bad news here - the answer is you don’t. I supply all my fragrances with screw-fit sprayers partly for this reason, but I’m in a minority - most houses prefer the crimp top because it’s much cheaper if you are mass-producing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lavender View Post
    My collection varies between vintage (80 years old or so) and some new modern stuff like Chanels, Diors, Guerlains, Lauders etc. (I need to work on updating my wardrobe...) Like now I have a 1/3 used bottle of Tommy Girl that I was thinking of decanting as I don't wear it as much.
    80 years old is right on the cusp: Channel No5, released in 1922, really starts the trend in the heavy use of aldehydes in perfumes. With things that have that bright, fresh-fruit scent you can bet they will be aldehydic: those need the greatest care in storage and are the only one’s I would consider refrigeration for. I keep most of my aldehyde raw materials under refrigeration and I know many of the bigger houses keep them stored under a layer of inert gas such as nitrogen, though I’m not suggesting either is necessary with a finished fragrance you certainly want to keep them dark and away from the air as much as you can.

    Bottom line: if decanting is going to mean spraying (rather than pouring) into a smaller bottle it is probably counterproductive: best leave them as they are.
    Chris Bartlett
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    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  24. #444

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Large collections, more then for one lifetime. impressive and daunting. i WONDER WHAT YOU WOULD SMELL LIKE AFTER YOU SPRAYED 3 SPRAYS OF EVERY SINGLE ONE on yourself? Has anyone done that? Then go to a public place and see if any one comments, tell them it's a new fragrance, and talk their ear off about it while standing really close to them.

  25. #445

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Thank you, @Chris

  26. #446

    Default Re: Guide to storage?

    Someone mentioned putting frags in a gun safe, if anyone here owns a safe can you check if whatever is inside is at cool a cool temperature.
    If not can you recommend a non electrical way of storing frag?

  27. #447

    Default Re: Perfume Storage

    Hmmm just bumping this one to get some updated opinions and see if anyone has specific information on specifically on relative humidity.

    A wine fridge for example looks like a good option allowing for storage at around 12C but relative humidity sits around 55% to 75%.

    Is 55% to 75% ok or too high?

    It gets to 30C to 40C where I live so I'm thinking about a small wine fridge but unsure because of:

    a. humidity

    b. light (wine fridges all seem to have glass doors)

  28. #448
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    Default Re: Perfume Storage

    IMO light is a much more destructive force to fragrance than humidity.

  29. #449
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    Default Re: Perfume Storage

    I just don't get why humidity would matter. The juice is inside a sealed glass bottle with a cap, right? Unless it is equipped with an old fashioned bulb sprayer I just do not see how humidity would matter AT ALL. I keep mine in my extra refrigerator set to about 50 deg F and this seems to work just fine. I don't think the juice inside the bottles minds if condensation collects on the outside of the bottles.

  30. #450

    Default Re: Perfume Storage

    Depends too much on the temperature. If the bottle has atomizer I see no problem about humidity. No sunlight and cooler temperatures are ideal.

  31. #451
    mihailo
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    Default Re: Perfume Storage

    Temperature swings and light are bad.
    Put your frags in a dark drawer and they will be fine.
    I would never keep my fragrances in the fridge.

  32. #452
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    Default Where do you store your fragrances?

    What I mean is--do you keep them somewhere other than, say, your medicine cabinet? I have two full bottles at the moment, but I also have around 30 samples...and both are growing. I'd like to split them up by season, day/night, etc...is there anything out there like that, or do I just need to make more room in my medicine cabinet?
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  33. #453

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    You can keep them wherever you like as long as they're in the dark and away from major heat sources. Drawers, closets, dark boxes all work fine. I keep them in drawers in my clothes cabinet. While a bathroom is convenient, they don't have to be there necessarily. After all, one usually sprays before putting clothes on, so near clothes works fine too.

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  34. #454

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Right now my colognes are in a two drawers. Before that I had them in a 4.0 cubic foot refrigerator.

  35. #455
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I just keep them on my dresser. If they were pricey niche frags I might consider more appropriate storage, but for designer the designer frags I have, if any of them up going bad (which is unlikely) I will just replace them. I should note that I live in the Pacific Northwest, so it's generally pretty cool and overcast here. If I lived in socal, I would probably do things differently.

    Also, I like to display the bottles in the room. I think of them as art.

  36. #456

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    A cupboard in our dresser. The cupboard has a door. On shelves. Not in their boxes.

    for swap/sale:





  37. #457

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Shelves or cabinets around the house, all these being protected from direct sunlight and artificial light, cool but not refrigerated, aired and rather dark.

  38. #458

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    In their boxes inside my closet.

  39. #459

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I have a cupboard in my bedroom, where it is relatively cool. The cupboard has a pretty glass door and glass shelves (and led lighting - all from IKEA, by the way) in the top part, where I store all my bottles and dekants, and solid door in the down part, where I store all my samples and dekanting supplies.
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  40. #460

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I have shelves on the wall away from the light but conveniently on display like in a shop.

  41. #461

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Currently in a shoe box at the bottom of my dresser. Might get a small wall cupboard put in when I redecorate my room.

  42. #462
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    In a walk in light and temp controlled basement vault

  43. #463

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Bathroom medicine cabinet.

  44. #464

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I have a wall cupboard where all my fragrances and shaving equipment is kept. Dark, away from sunlight (both natural/artificial) and no humidity.

  45. #465

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    some Ikea display case, wish it was protected from light more, but I do enjoy looking at them


  46. #466
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I keep mine in the wine refrigerator. The best fragrances going there and designers in their box on the shelf in a walk-in closet.
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  47. #467

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Quote Originally Posted by starshipvelcro View Post
    some Ikea display case, wish it was protected from light more, but I do enjoy looking at them

    Mother of God.

  48. #468
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I keep mine inside of a closed cabinet, away from light, and in a room where it never becomes very warm.

  49. #469
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Thanks, guys!! It seems what I'm doing isn't that far off of others. Let me ask this, though: My bathroom kind of splits. The most space is where the sinks are. Where the toilet and standing shower (no tub) reside is barely the size of a closet (the joys of living in a Victorian). The medicine cabinet where I keep my bottles/samples is in this closet-like area. When I shower, I keep the sliding doors open and turn the fan/vent on, but it can still get steamy. Even with the cabinet doors closed, is this too much heat/humidity for them?
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  50. #470

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Temporarily, they are in a dresser drawer; and the boxes are in a separate one.

  51. #471

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    starshipvelcro - extremely impressed and envious of your collection.

  52. #472

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Part of them are in a dark closet, the rest are in their original boxes in a semi-dark room...


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  53. #473

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    I found a nice wood storage cabinet formerly used for CDs and stereo for cheap at a car boot sale. Liquor cabinets work well too.

  54. #474

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Wooden drawer. Nice and cool, and keeps the light away.

  55. #475
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Quote Originally Posted by Teach13 View Post
    Thanks, guys!! It seems what I'm doing isn't that far off of others. Let me ask this, though: My bathroom kind of splits. The most space is where the sinks are. Where the toilet and standing shower (no tub) reside is barely the size of a closet (the joys of living in a Victorian). The medicine cabinet where I keep my bottles/samples is in this closet-like area. When I shower, I keep the sliding doors open and turn the fan/vent on, but it can still get steamy. Even with the cabinet doors closed, is this too much heat/humidity for them?
    I don't think keeping your fragrances in the medicine cabinet is wise; the humidity and abrupt change in temperature may be deleterious. Here's an article that will be informative and relevant: http://www.helium.com/items/1577625-...gne-or-perfume

    &


  56. #476
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Good article. Thanks!!
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  57. #477

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    i have just been keeping mine on top of my dresser in my room

    i hope i have not been ruining any fragrance by doing so!

  58. #478
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    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Is room temperature good or should they be cooler?

  59. #479
    Super Member mt219's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Rochester Hills, Michigan
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    i keep them on my dresser in my room. it's really dark, and never gets that warm, so i'm not too worried about it.

  60. #480

    Default Re: Where do you store your fragrances?

    Quote Originally Posted by vortex View Post
    Is room temperature good or should they be cooler?
    Room temperature, assuming its between around 19 C and 24 C , is more than fine.

    for swap/sale:





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