Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1

    Default Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Flowers, Sea, Morning Dew, Petrol, Curry, Coffee, Glue, Burning, Urinals (never know), Wine, Coal, Onions, Nuts, Cheese, Paint, Bleach, B.O, Pencil Shavings, Sweat, Chlorine.

    As fragrance enthusiasts, would you say you have MORE of a liking towards smells in general than the general public?

    For instance: a lot of people like the smell of fresh coffee, or rather coffee drinkers do. But when you're in the morning queue at the coffee house, do you take a good deliberate sniff of the air for pleasure, or are you the person who just wants to drink and go to work - the general consumer.

    Perhaps it's in our DNA; a greater liking of smells than the general public. It may be a subsconcious thing that we're not aware of, the way we subconsciously take in all the smells around us en route to work. Or, maybe, you developed your liking towards bottled fragrance, and bottled fragrance alone. It could be a 'fad' for some.

    I believe my liking for smells, excluding bottled fragrance, is slightly greater than my peers. I'll take whiffs of the food I'm eating at a buffet. When I'm chilling at a girls place who has scented flowers, I'll do the 'female' thing and sniff if a few times up close while mates just chill on the sofa.

    What do you people think? A love for bottled fragrances only, a developed liking, maybe a DNA trait to make you enjoy smells in general, perhaps something else. Your thoughts please.
    Last edited by silverscreen; 21st March 2008 at 04:18 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    mmmm... no. It is true that some people are naturally able to detect some scents while others do not. It is also true that some people just cannot stand some scents. Moreover, we are naturally compelled to like some the smell of somethings(food, fresh water and herbs) and a the same time hate others (rotten meat, fices, skunk), but that hardly makes you an enthusiast. Nurture wins this round against nature. It is a cultural thing, something learned and developed. WE BNers are not freaks of nature. We turned to be perfume freaks all by ourselves.

  3. #3
    Scentronic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Metro Detroit, Michigan
    Posts
    2,748

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    One of my favorite places in the world in the coffee isle at the grocery store! The smell of all those different blends getting ground up. It doesn't get any better than that for me. I need to invent some sort of device that just constantly grinds coffee beans to fill the scent of my home with coffee. I would never get tired of it. I only drink coffee about once a month, and it is always a Starbucks "Java-Chip", iced, blended chocolatey-drink.

    Now that I'm re-reading your title, I understand that you're asking if we - as fragrance connoisseurs on Basenotes, have a genetic predisposition to appreciation of scent. Hmmm.

    I paint - as visual play and enrichment. I smell fragrance - as the same for my sense of smell... Am deeply appreciative of music (especially "audibly-interesting" music), dance as a form of physical expression, and would like to believe that I have at least a certain adequet level of culinary "taste".

    Now, being the flaming metrosexual that society has labeled me, it would stand to reason that this appreciation of sensory stimulation and expression is only due to my metrosexuality. Whatever.

    + + +

    Once upon a time, a guy found something and said, "hey that smells pretty good", and found a way to put it in a bottle. Then, later, I came along and found the bottle, and said, "hey, that smells pretty good", and bought the bottle. The End!
    Lately I've been wearing:
    Windsor, Bois de Santal, Original Santal, Elixir, Douro, Endymion, Reflection, Arcus, Marwah

  4. #4

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentronic View Post
    Now that I'm re-reading your title, I understand that you're asking if we - as fragrance connoisseurs on Basenotes, have a genetic predisposition to appreciation of scent. Hmmm.
    Spot on.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    No. I believe that the predominant factor that explains our taste for scents is not genetic. I believe that what really prodominates in this case is the person's education and experiences. In other words, it is a phenotypical thing, where the most important factors are the personal experiences and the influence of the environment.


    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 21st March 2008 at 04:21 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    I would have to agree that fragrance is in our DNA. At least in terms of flowers and gourmand scents. It's not hard to imagine that over so many generations of human evolution, We have become hardwired to make positive associations with scents that indicate food sources, warmth, or mating opportunities.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Thaifighter,

    I also believe that we enjoy smells because it is programmed in our DNA. Actually, we could argue that *everything* that we like and enjoy should be attributed to our genetic code. But what I argue is that the differences among people regarding the love for smells (their specific tastes) can be explained predominantly by their life experiences and the influence of the environment.

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 21st March 2008 at 05:55 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    I couldn't argue with that at all...

    My whole rationale for not wearing Eau Sauvage or Monsieur de Givenchy or anything along those lines when I go out is that they were popular in an era bygone.

    How many pretty young things had some dirty old lech cop a feel off them while wearing that stuff?

    or her dad wore it...

    or worse, her grandfather...

    I like them well enough to wear them at home when I am in the mood. They are excellent.

    This is my whole rationale for my enjoyment of rose scents. LOTS of women have made strong associations with that scent, and very few of them negative...

    We definitely form the majority of our associations with certain scents environmentally, especially those that are not pursuant to our survival. I think the fact that many of us have to "learn" to love certain frags and that they can "grow" on us is good evidence of that fact.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    I got my B.S. in Psychology, and I can tell you right away that there is no genetic link to loving fragrances. Obviously, there can be a genetic factor allowing one to better smell, which would strengthen a relationship with fragrances, but it is definitely nature/environmental factors that create that kind of obsession, just like some people love watches or comics or baseball or whatever.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Q: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    A: No more than there is a "gay gene" in your DNA. Although I just opened pandora's box here on basenotes, I want to say that it is my opinion that loving fragrance as well a person deciding to be homosexual is a "learned behavior". There may be intrinsic factors leading to a person's decision but, I hold firm belief that decisions to love a thing or a behavior is learned and not programed. Inherent qualities stem from choices, the choice to love or not love. True, there are genetic predispositions but ultimately, it is your choice.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Yes. I think that we like to have sex because its in our genes, but our preference for a certain gender depends predominantly on our experiences and education. This is a controversial topic, but I have a strong opinion about it.

    The same thing is valid for scents. We love to use fragrances because our genes enable us to have pleasure with olfactory experiences. But our specific tastes are acquired and depend on our learning, our experiences.

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 23rd March 2008 at 02:10 AM.

  12. #12
    DON'T DRINK AND DRESS

    kbe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    The Big Blue Marble
    Posts
    17,982
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    I don't see why fragrance loving couldn't be in our DNA to some degree. It certainly would seem to be a beneficial adaptation over millennia for both mammals and fruits and vegetables alike, mammals becoming attracted to 'nice' smelling nutritious food by trial and error at first and eventually by instinct, while plants benefiting in the fight for survival by having their seed more widely spread.

    Most fruit and vegetables I enjoy have pleasant scents to me. Poisonous, toxic or noxious plants seem to mostly have bitter/sharp unpleasant smells to me. Of course there are exceptions. Is this a learned behavior or something more instinctual? Attraction to 'pleasant' scent somehow smacks of DNA coding.
    Our job is to live joyfully in this world of sorrows--Joseph Campbell

  13. #13

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    Yes, you're quite right. There are many "branches" of scents that are pleasant to us, and many branches of scents that are unpleasant, and this classification is valid to almost all individuals. In this case, you love or hate the smell because you are pre-programmed to do that.

    But in the case of fragrances, where most of the notes belong to the "good" branches, the experiences of the person play a more important and decisive part in determining if you will enjoy it more or less intensively.

    See the difference?

    .

  14. #14

    Default Re: Would you say that fragrance loving is in our DNA?

    I would like to touch on experience as Lucious mentioned. I believe cognitive olfactive development indeed stems from the types of experiences we have throughout the lifespan. Allergies and other factors aside, if we had nothing but pure, uninterrupted indulgence in various aromas, I believe our early impressions and familiaralities serves as the basis and reference point from which all future encounters will be judged and compared. To me, this shapes our predispositions and liklehood that we will like or dislike a particular aroma.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •