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  1. #1

    Lightbulb New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Hey

    I'm part of a small team of Cambridge University students developing an exciting new fragrance product (outside of our PhD research mind you...) We'd love to get some feedback on the idea, so we've set up a short survey, should only take a couple of minutes to complete. There is a paragraph in the survey that explains what we are doing. Any other questions please don't hesitate to ask.

    http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.aspx?s...YQTQbCcQ_3d_3d
    (the original link was not working so this has been updated)

    Thanks,

    The Rescent Team
    Last edited by Rescent; 8th April 2008 at 03:13 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    The gel idea doesn't sound appealing, and I doubt its likely to work, but, good luck

  3. #3

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Vivek View Post
    The gel idea doesn't sound appealing, and I doubt its likely to work, but, good luck
    There are actually some gel-based fragrances on the market already, such as Clinique's Aromatics Elixir Velvet Sheer and Chanel's No. 5 Sensual Elixir. In the survey we have intentionally not marketed the gel as a positive aspect in order to get as neutral a response as possible. If you look up either of those scents I have just mentioned you will notice how they emphasise the sensuality and soft feel of the gel-based products.

    Thanks for your kind wishes :-)

  4. #4

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Ah I was mistaken, I thought by gel you meant a solid gel that is similar to a solid perfume! Few people do prefer them over the normal liquid perfume, but as far as I am aware, gel perfumes leave less sillage, and have less projection, hence making them more intimate, similar a perfume oil. But the idea of being able to release the perfume at your will sounds fantastic, but slightly sci-fi, it would be fantastic if it did catch on though

  5. #5

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Personally I think this can only lead to further dumbing down of the products on offer.
    Perfume progression and development will disappear.
    (No need for complex compositions - just put more calone in to be released later.)
    Most longevity issues are actually issues of people expecting high sillage from low volatility materials or expecting high volatility materials to evaporate more slowly i.e. - a fundamental misunderstanding.
    Also - I have noticed that as my nose has developed, I notice certain accords much more than I used to. When you haven't figured out how an accord smell you may not notice it.
    "Donít try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. Ē - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  6. #6

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Our aim is certainly not to encourage any "dumbing down" in the fragrance industry. As scientists ourselves we'd much rather people wanted to know more about the mechanics of fragrances and scent and how that interacts with our olfactory system. Part of the reason we have chosen to post on here is to get feedback from the "real" fragrance experts, i.e. you, people who regularly wear different fragrances and actually spend time thinking about how they could be improved.

    Personally I think you will find there is a lot of innovation currently going on in the fragrance industry because of a dire need to stand out from the competition. The idea behind our product is to contain some of the more volatile materials within vesicles so that they can be re-released at a later time. The containment relies on the composition of the gel system.

    It may not be successful, but that is not going to stop us trying ;-) Thanks for all of your feedback so far - negative feedback is often more helpful!
    Last edited by Rescent; 8th April 2008 at 04:42 PM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescent View Post
    Our aim is certainly not to encourage any "dumbing down" in the fragrance industry. As scientists ourselves we'd much rather people wanted to know more about the mechanics of fragrances and scent and how that interacts with our olfactory system. Part of the reason we have chosen to post on here is to get feedback from the "real" fragrance experts, i.e. you, people who regularly wear different fragrances and actually spend time thinking about how they could be improved.

    Personally I think you will find there is a lot of innovation currently going on in the fragrance industry because of a dire need to stand out from the competition. The idea behind our product is to contain some of the more volatile materials within vesicles so that they can be re-released at a later time. The containment relies on the composition of the polymer-vesicle gel system.

    It may not be successful, but that is not going to stop us trying ;-) Thanks for all of your feedback so far - negative feedback is often more helpful!

    I'm sure that you guys are not aiming to dumb down - you are scientists with an interesting and innovative idea and I applaud that . However, the way for fragrance companies to make their product stand out from the competition is to spend money on high quality ingredients for the formula. There are some niche companies doing this and succeeding (and many who don't and die under pressure from the increasingly conglomerated giants) but just about all the mainstream companies are cutting the quality of their formulae drastically. Most of the innovation which is taking place seems to be directed at finding lower cost materials which can do an olfactory job (almost always at a lower level) in place of a more expensive one.
    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 4th April 2008 at 11:54 PM.
    "Donít try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. Ē - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  8. #8

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder View Post
    I'm sure that you guys are not aiming to dumb down - you are scientists with an interesting and innovative idea and I applaud that . However, the way for fragrance companies to make their product stand out from the competition is to spend money on high quality ingredients for the formula. There are some niche companies doing this and succeeding (and many who don't and die under pressure from the increasingly conglomerated giants) but just about all the mainstream companies are cutting the quality of their formulae drastically. Most of the innovation which is taking place seems to be directed at finding lower cost materials which can do an olfactory job (almost always at a lower level) in place of a more expensive one.
    Would you be able to name some of these niche companies? I'm asking this on a purely personal note, lately I've been enjoying the fairly unisex scents of Jo Malone, which seem to be made from quality ingredients compared to some other scents I've used in the past, but I'm not enough of an expert to say this for certain.

  9. #9

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    I would not wear a gel fragrance and don't believe that technology is necessary. I would have to agree with hirch; its all about the quality.

  10. #10

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescent View Post
    Would you be able to name some of these niche companies? I'm asking this on a purely personal note, lately I've been enjoying the fairly unisex scents of Jo Malone, which seem to be made from quality ingredients compared to some other scents I've used in the past, but I'm not enough of an expert to say this for certain.
    Companies which use good ingredients in my opinion: Villoresi, Les Nez, Storer, Creed, C&S, Trumper, Amouage, Hermes, Ormonde Jayne, Rosine. I've probably forgotten many. Guerlain still seem to use good stuff to a large extent too.

    Have you got the facility to "ping" (find out which molecules are in a formula) where you work/study?
    "Donít try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. Ē - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  11. #11
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    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    I would not wear a gel fragrance and don't believe that technology is necessary. I would have to agree with hirch; its all about the quality.
    I certainly agree that quality of ingredients is a priority, but I don't think that necessarily excludes gel fragrances. Rescent states Chanel No 5 sensual elixir is considered a "gel" (though I'm not sure how this differs from "oil"). I tried this recently with some trepidation, as other No 5 variants sadly still don't settle down on me (I've been trying to wear it for DECADES), and I found it to be most wearable. Perhaps this is because it lacks the strong aldehydes. Or are gels more linear by their nature?

    I'm intrigued by being able to refresh fragrance without having to reapply. Sometimes I reapply because I want to boost enjoyable middle notes that have too quickly faded. L'eau par Kenzo comes to mind. I think scents with citrus and other fresh, volatile notes could benefit well from this technology.
    Eddie: Sweetie, what are you drinking?
    Patsy: Oh, this? Chanel No. 5.
    -- Absolutely Fabulous

  12. #12

    Default Re: New delayed release fragrance technology - market survey

    Quote Originally Posted by Rescent View Post
    Would you be able to name some of these niche companies? I'm asking this on a purely personal note, lately I've been enjoying the fairly unisex scents of Jo Malone, which seem to be made from quality ingredients compared to some other scents I've used in the past, but I'm not enough of an expert to say this for certain.
    Jo Malone scents (Proctor & Gamble) are a good example. Quality ingredients.

    I think Lorenzo Villoresi uses top quality raw materials, and I do think Creed
    [regardless of the bad rap some give them here] uses good ingredients.
    Diptyque is another line that is filled with excellent scents. Annick Goutal is another.
    Patou still produces excellent female scents, with even their new scent --
    Sira des Indes -- being of high quality, though decided more modern than Joy
    and 1000. Caron still use good ingredients, and while Chanel is receiving flak for
    tampering with their formulas, they have historically had a high standard for their
    ingredients. Not all of these are Niche, I know, but they are all worth investigating.

    I've not sampled the newer versions of the Maitre Parfumer et Gantier scents, but their
    line has a great reputation: Racine is a great citrus/vetiver; Eau des Iles is punchy and
    satisfying, Santal Noble (recently apparently dumbed down) was often thought of as the
    king of Sandalwood scents.

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