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  1. #1

    Default The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Yes, the Eau de Cologne is making a comeback! The days of fruity floral aquatic synth bombs are over!

    "...and suddenly the oldest thing that our grandparents wore has become the new ultra-cool must-have."

    http://www.independent.co.uk/life-st...me-834247.html

    Cologne is the little black dress of perfumes. It's a basic, it's a classic, it will suit you forever and every girl (and boy, for colognes are unisex) should have at least one in a fragrance collection.

    This scent is a refreshing antidote to the simpering, cloying and cynically commercial fruity florals now clogging up perfume counters. With its zesty, citric top notes, it is as refreshingly crisp as a newly laundered white shirt, making it an ideal splash or coolant in summer. Its dilute concentration makes it as subtle, translucent and evanescent as chiffon to wear.
    But take note: you wear a cologne, it does not wear you. And the long history of eaux de Cologne it is one of the most antediluvian of perfume genres makes it, like the little black dress, unlikely to go out of style. Fragrance, like fashion, is currently revisiting the classics, and the cologne, with its fresh, bright nature, is one of perfumery's most enduring products.
    The word cologne in perfumery can denote one of two things. The first is broad, relating to the concentration of actual perfume used in a particular formula. An eau de Cologne contains between 3 and 5 per cent pure perfume, whereas eau de toilette usually contains 12 to 14 per cent. But the word refers to more than just strength; like the terms oriental and chypre, it describes the type and personality of a perfume and indicates that specific ingredients, usually citrus, will be used.

    "Cologne defines a form of perfume that is always predicated on the feeling of freshness," says Francis Kurkdjian, the "nose" who created Gaultier's new Fleur du Male cologne. "Historically and traditionally, the colognes are structures which rest on freshness."
    The core ingredients are hesperidic citrus notes notes of bergamot, lemon, orange, grapefruit and tangerine. According to Pierre Guillaume of Parfumerie Gnrale, which has produced the new Cologne Grand Sicle: "These will be combined with at least one product of the orange tree (neroli or petitgrain, for example), various aromatic (rosemary, basil, etc) or floral (jasmine, iris) or spicy essences (coriander), and the woody notes of cedar and musks."
    The resurgence in colognes has been something of a Noughties phenomenon. Acqua di Parma, a cologne dating from 1916, became a modern cult when it was revived in the 1990s; it was subsequently bought by LVMH in 2003. A cluster of newer colognes have followed in its wake. Comme des Garons released Series 4: Cologne in 2002; it comprised three gigantic bottles of scent, each a cologne variant, inspired by those huge bottles of fragrance normally found in Spanish supermarkets and farmacia.

    Also in 2002 came Thierry Mugler's tingling, acerbic cologne. And, in 2004, the nose Jean-Claude Ellena produced a mellower, sweet, rindy conflation of citrus notes, called Cologne Bigarade, for Editions de Parfums Frdric Malle. In February 2007, Chanel's sharp, dry Les Exclusifs Eau de Cologne followed.
    Cologne enthusiasts will have noticed the crisp, refreshing properties of Prada's Infusion d'Iris, launched last summer, which has that freshly laundered linen smell, engendered by orange blossom and mandarin top notes.
    But it's summer 2008 that's set to see the real renaissance of the genre, with several cologne or cologne-like citrus fragrances to be launched. Miller Harris's Le Petit Grain; Dior's Escale à Portofino; Lorenzo Villaresi's Acqua di Colonia; Caron's Les Plus Belles Lavandes; Comme des Garons Series 8: Energy C; Missoni's Arancia an array of zestful, lemony-orangey fragrances are about to arrive at the counters.
    "Since the early Nineties, there's been a trend for very fresh fragrances pioneered by New West, l'Eau d'Issey and Escape," says the perfume expert and founder of Harrods Haute Parfumerie, Roja Dove. "What's more, the market is currently saturated with new launches which are bland. Young women have never smelt colognes before and suddenly the oldest thing that our grandparents wore has become the new ultra-cool must-have."
    In a world obsessed by the provenance of the ingredients in beauty products, the cologne provides a natural alternative to the deluge of synthetics in perfumery. As Dove points out, classic colognes are 100 per cent natural, so they suit a modern lifestyle that's moving away from the chemical and the synthetic.

    Parfumerie Gnrale's Cologne Grande Sicle isn't just 100 per cent natural, it is 99.4 per cent certified organic. "I like to think the return of the cologne is a sign of the prevailing need for authenticity, simplicity and naturalness," says Pierre Guillaume of Parfumerie Gnrale. "It's a guarantee of quality, a kind of return to basics, a 'break' for our olfactory senses."

    The genealogy of cologne can be traced back to the 10th and 11th centuries, when the Persian doctor and philosopher Avicenna was one of the first people to document the art of distillation as a means of producing essential oils and alcohol. By the 14th century, Elizabeth, Queen of Hungary was bathing in and imbibing a cure-all concoction of herbs steeped in alcohol, known as Hungary Water: an early antecedent of eau de Cologne. And by the 18th century came Aqua Mirabilis a concoction of lemon, orange, bergamot, rosemary, bitter orange and neroli created by Jean Paul Feminis of Milan. In 1693, Feminis settled in Cologne in Germany, and the scent became known as eau de Cologne.
    Many of the venerable eaux de Cologne are still around today. The 4711 brand, a light conflation of lemon, orange, bergamot, neroli, rosemary and lavender, as recognisable as Coca-Cola, is still one of the first perfumes teenagers discover in Boots. It was invented by a Carthusian monk in Cologne in 1792; he gave it to a young couple as a wedding gift.

    Roger & Gallet's Extra Vieille, created by Jean Marie Farina in 1806 and believed to have been used by Napoleon, "has a wonderful intrinsic honesty", says Roja Dove. Guerlain's acerbic Eau Imperiale, another landmark scent, arrived in 1853. So did Acqua di Genova (available from Dove's Haute Parfumerie and Les Senteurs), a delicious, high-summery splash of an ancient cologne, created by the famous distiller Stafano Frecceri and still handmade, with notes of lemon, bergamot and sweet orange giving way to a heart of rose and neroli and base of woods and citrus concentrates.
    Traditionally, colognes had many uses: they were sprinkled on bed linen, poured into bathwater, diluted and drunk as a cure-all, dropped on to handkerchiefs during fetid summer weather. "To me, colognes are as much grooming products as they are perfumes," says Frdric Malle. "One wears them to smell clean and sharp, often as a final touch to his or her morning routine. I believe that one can wear massive doses of colognes without ever smelling too strong. That's why colognes should be splashed, rather than sprayed, which is the best way to make them last."
    As Malle attests, the mood-brightening astringency of a cologne can become something of a summer addiction. Thankfully, their lemony lightness means that you can, in fact, never wear too much.




    What are some of your favorite EDC fragrances?

    I myself am partial to juices like Chanel pour monsieur, Creed bois de Cedrat, Guerlain Eau Imperiale, AdP Colonia, amongst others
    Last edited by zztopp; 26th May 2008 at 07:57 AM.
    -

  2. #2

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    That is a bit hard to read on my monitor... but interesting nonetheless.

    And even though it isn't entirely a traditional EdC, I love the original Baldessarini.

    Mugler's Cologne is also very good, and again, not quite a traditional EdC either.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    4711 is actually good if short lived.
    Eau d'Orange verte
    YSL Pour Homme.
    Chanel pour monsieur,
    AdPC.
    Chanel Allure Sport Cologne (not really traditional)
    Vetiveru (CdG)

    And yes, retro-style is getting Cool
    Fedoras, Automatic Watches, Straight Razors, Fountain Pens...

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Quote Originally Posted by irish View Post

    And yes, retro-style is getting Cool
    Fedoras, Automatic Watches, Straight Razors, Fountain Pens...
    OMG, I have all of those (except my watches are manual wind), I must be cool for the first time in my life

    Trads:
    Farina Gegenüber
    Acqua di Parma
    Acqua di Genova
    Guerlain Imperiale, du Coq
    R&G Farina Extra Vieille
    Berdoues No. 444 Extra Vieille

    Moderns:
    Eau de Guerlain
    Hermes: Eau d'Orange Verte, Concentrée d'Orange Verte
    Asprey Purple Water
    Laboratoire des Sources Organic EdCs: Hesperides, Verbena, Balsamic
    R&G Eau de Gingembre, Cologne
    CdG Vettiveru

    close enough EdTs:
    Clinique Happy Men
    M. Balmain
    Signoricci
    Eau Sauvage
    Goutal Eau du Sud
    MPG Jeune homme

    dying to try:
    Chanel Cologne
    Dior Portofino
    Institut Trés Bien Colognes
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  5. #5
    Sur la Plage

    petruccijc's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Berdoues 1902 EDCs - Naturelle, Vetiver, Lavender, and Thé Vert
    Mont St. Michel - Ambre
    Etro - Lemon Sorbet
    Marc Jacobs - Ivy
    Please feel free to check out my Swap Thread - Patou pour Homme, L'Instant de Guerlain PH Extreme, Dior Homme Intense, Pure Malt, Pure Coffee and many more! Click Here For My Swap Thread

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Question is: who is Bethan Cole? Anyone know?
    That is one of the best written and informed pieces I have ever seen in mainstream press.

    On another note:
    I hate it when something I like anyway suddenly starts getting written about. Feels like someone has just taken a little bit of my individuality away. Then there is the period afterwards when it goes out of fashion and everyone thinks I am a bit passe. Doesn't stop me wearing it though...
    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 26th May 2008 at 12:21 PM.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    The newly released Jean Paul Gaultier Mousier proves the point. Personally, I like vettiveru as well as Hermes'.

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Hermes Eau D'Orange Verte
    Creed Bois de Cedrat
    Comme des Garçons Vettiveru
    D&G Masculine

  9. #9
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    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    I own this gigantic rectangular plastic bottle of cologne I bought at the supermarket, the label says SANDALO and it's flat, minimal take on sandalwood is suprisingly tenacious. You can buy it for about $3. One of my favorites.

    Others: Eau d'Orange Verte by Hermes and Rose Water by Santa Maria Novella.
    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple"

    -- Jack Kerouac

  10. #10

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Quote from hirch_duckfinder:
    "I hate it when something I like anyway suddenly starts getting written about. Feels like someone has just taken a little bit of my individuality away. Then there is the period afterwards when it goes out of fashion and everyone thinks I am a bit passe. Doesn't stop me wearing it though..."
    __________________________________________________ __________________________________


    hirch_duckfinder, oh…how I feel your pain…

    (BTW I’ve really enjoyed your posts here about edc’s, and I’m definitely a fellow fan of the eaux.)

    This article, while well informed, exists purely to generate advertising revenue…it’s that simple: we are reading nothing but advertising. It’s an article that pretends to educate, but only does so because the subject at hand is now an “ultra-cool must-have” for young women. Hirch, you are absolutely correct to feel angry, used, and taken advantage of, and I feel the same way. Your individual style is being co-opted and hijacked by a corporation looking to mass market it and make millions. That’s the way corporations operate in the new millennium, they create an image of “hip” and “sexy” entirely ripped off from genuinely creative people, and that image is, in turn, followed in every detail by the majority who take it for granted as “hip” and “sexy” without question. Fortunately for the corporations, that which is “hip” and “sexy” changes every year, so they can be assured of making billions of dollars by continually feeding on the insecurities of consumers who don’t what to be left out of the “cool” group or left behind from their more “successful” friends. Corporations count on their target demographic to spend thousands per capita annually (usually charged on f**king credit cards), and the lemmings happily oblige, on what is marketed to them to be a symbol of “successful” and “comfortable” yet also “hip” and “edgy” at the same time. Big business is not just satisfied with selling products anymore, they are selling us our culture, and we are selling our souls to line up and buy it. Makes me absolutely sick!!!

    Well that felt damn good!

    ***Zztopp, my rant was absolutely not meant to derail your OP, and I meant no disrespect. I’m really glad to have read the article as it pertains to edc’s; thanks for posting it! I use Eau Du Coq all the time, but definitely more frequently in the summertime. I also have Eau de Rochas Homme, which I love and reminds me a lot of Blenheim Bouquet, but easier on the wallet, and I find it actually lasts longer on me. I do love Castile from Penhaligon’s though as a lighter EDT in the spirit of an EDC, and haven’t found any substitution for that.

  11. #11

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    The Brits are really good with EdCs.
    An easy house to like is Jo Malone. Their range fulfills my cologne needs quite nicely. Amber and Lavender has quite a fresh accord, with the amber giving it more staying power than a classic EdC. I wish my gym's locker room smelled liked this.
    I can't wait to try their much touted Lime Basil & Mandarin.
    Last edited by Kevin Guyer; 27th May 2008 at 04:39 PM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    French house Rancé 1795 makes some nice colognes.
    No guru, not method, no teacher
    Just you and I and nature

  13. #13

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Eau Fraiche by Dior is my new favorite!
    Oh please, if everyone around here is going to start telling the truth, I'm going to bed. - The House of Yes

  14. #14

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Quote Originally Posted by bront82 View Post
    Eau Fraiche by Dior is my new favorite!
    Trusting your exquisite taste and my need to own all things Roudnitska, I just ordered it blind. That said, if I don't like it, I'm going to fly out to Los Angeles and pour the entire bottle on you.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Now that I'm thinking about it, the cologne version of Dior Homme which was released last year was most likely created in light of the article's comments. I haven't smelled it yet, but I guess Dior (or Slimane, before he left?) saw the eau-de-cologne hip level going up, back then - and decided to apply it to DH.
    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple"

    -- Jack Kerouac

  16. #16

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Now that I'm thinking about it, the cologne version of Dior Homme which was released last year was most likely created in light of the article's comments. I haven't smelled it yet, but I guess Dior (or Slimane, before he left?) saw the eau-de-cologne hip level going up, back then - and decided to apply it to DH.
    I believe Heidi headed for the hills before the EdC came out.

  17. #17

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    arlecchino, no offense taken - like yourself and h_d, I am a huge fan of classic EDC style fragrances, but am hoping that the refocused attention on this genre results in a genre innovation.

    Ruggles, Malone's Amber and Lavender is my fave - light, yet substantial, with a focused familiar barbershop vibe. I need to own it ( I bought Pomegranate Noir instead, which was a big mistake .. any takers?)
    -

  18. #18

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    I took a shower after the gym tonight and splashed on Eau de Rochas, the original, not the pour Homme. The first hour is an excruciatingly loud, juniper meets Comet accord, but then, the mossy cedar dry down is pure heaven.

  19. #19

    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Just tried Escale a Portofino. It's quite nice, a cologne style with soft florals giving it a feminine edge. Far more natural smelling than the disappointing Apres la Mousson. No need to buy it though, since I already have a bottle of Acqua di Genova .
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: The Return of Mr. Fresh and light

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggles View Post
    I took a shower after the gym tonight and splashed on Eau de Rochas, the original, not the pour Homme. The first hour is an excruciatingly loud, juniper meets Comet accord, but then, the mossy cedar dry down is pure heaven.
    Comet, as in Comet Disinfectant Cleanser with Bleach? Really?
    "One day I will find the right words, and they will be simple"

    -- Jack Kerouac

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