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  1. #1

    Exclamation The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the Man

    The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the Manner of Top Middle and Base Notes in a Perfume


    Anya McCoy's Natural Perfume Notes: Anya McCoy takes us on a tour of the changing opinions of natural perfumery by critics and the public:In late Spring 2005 perfume bloggers wafted out across the Internet, writing in a giddy and groundbreaking manner about sampling and reviewing perfumes, discussing the ascent of niche houses and other lovely bits of minutiae, gossip and fun. I wandered into this fragrant party early on, discovering Now Smell This, Bois de Jasmin and many other blogs. Friendly as could be, the perfumistas welcomed the notion of natural perfumes as I posted about them, since the majority of them had never come across this form of perfumery either by name or sniff.

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  2. #2

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    "When we see consumers rejecting traditional perfumery and traditional distribution in favor of smaller and smaller niches, and even following the latest awful trend …. which is mixing their own perfumes – we know that we have a problem because after that will be…to stop consuming.”*

    *Perfumer and Flavorist magazine August 2007 p. 42-44

    ". . . to stop consuming."????? My, oh my! Who wrote such a silly statement! If I haven't spent over $100 on essential oils in the past few months, you can lick my mothballs. The nice thing about capitalism is that markets evolve with demand. And there is always demand.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    I had to chuckle when I read the part about Bob Dylan and his electric guitar... So now the natural perfumers are the "brave" ones? The Dylan analogy sounds a bit familiar, yet somehow a bit twisted this time...


  4. #4

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    FTR, Tania Sanchez and I also gave four stars to two excellent all-natural creations by Aesop, Marrakech and Mystra.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    O.K., the Monet comparison is a bit much, but Dylan works.


    Quote Originally Posted by luca turin View Post
    FTR, Tania Sanchez and I also gave four stars to two excellent all-natural creations by Aesop, Marrakech and Mystra.

    Congrats, you're now firmly ensconced in "The Third Stage."

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    I'm glad Anya feels so realized. I don't know that I share her view of perfume making as a cause.
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    Quote Originally Posted by Minou2 View Post
    O.K., the Monet comparison is a bit much, but Dylan works.


    But the funny thing about the Dylan comparison is that it's been stolen and twisted around here. Over a year ago I was the one comparing the natural perfumers to the folkies who booed and hissed when Dylan went electric-- and it's the same sort of attitude when it comes to the possibilities of expanding the perfumers' palette with so called synthetic materials. It's like saying that the Moog, the theremin, and pointy guitars have no place in music. It was a great analogy-- that's why it's so curious that the author has decided to recast it to where suddenly the natural perfumers are the ones who are pushing the envelope...

    Sure, back when I made my initial comments about the "Dylan" thing, I was also a bit green in my comprehension of certain things like the labelling of allergens on boxes and equating that with synthetics--which isn't strictly the case. I'm still learning new things every day. I don't want to come off crass at all or seem disrespectful to natural perfumers, but to me the whole thing seems like a three-legged-sack-race, or the guy who wrote that novel without using the letter "e". Does anybody know if the book was even any good?

    I don't have a problem with natural perfumery. I do have issues with implicit attitudes that "all-natural" is magically better. I'm know that these natural perfumers have spent a lot of time on their craft. They have good noses. There is an art to what they do. But I get the nagging feeling sometimes that it's the same sort of art that you see at renaissance fairs. Can a person make a great perfume using only "natural" ingredients? Maybe. But why the limits? There is probably an immense wealth of knowledge available to the natural perfumer-- probably some long forgotten material that could be tinctured and become the next great modern note (like agarwood). So much possibility... and then to shoot oneself in the foot and say "No, I'm not going to use any aldehydes in this," it just seems like a waste of potential.

    Nobody is booing the natural perfumer. It's more like crickets.

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    Quote Originally Posted by Indie_Guy View Post
    But the funny thing about the Dylan comparison is that it's been stolen and twisted around here. Over a year ago I was the one comparing the natural perfumers to the folkies who booed and hissed when Dylan went electric-- and it's the same sort of attitude when it comes to the possibilities of expanding the perfumers' palette with so called synthetic materials. It's like saying that the Moog, the theremin, and pointy guitars have no place in music. It was a great analogy-- that's why it's so curious that the author has decided to recast it to where suddenly the natural perfumers are the ones who are pushing the envelope...

    Sure, back when I made my initial comments about the "Dylan" thing, I was also a bit green in my comprehension of certain things like the labelling of allergens on boxes and equating that with synthetics--which isn't strictly the case. I'm still learning new things every day. I don't want to come off crass at all or seem disrespectful to natural perfumers, but to me the whole thing seems like a three-legged-sack-race, or the guy who wrote that novel without using the letter "e". Does anybody know if the book was even any good?

    I don't have a problem with natural perfumery. I do have issues with implicit attitudes that "all-natural" is magically better. I'm know that these natural perfumers have spent a lot of time on their craft. They have good noses. There is an art to what they do. But I get the nagging feeling sometimes that it's the same sort of art that you see at renaissance fairs. Can a person make a great perfume using only "natural" ingredients? Maybe. But why the limits? There is probably an immense wealth of knowledge available to the natural perfumer-- probably some long forgotten material that could be tinctured and become the next great modern note (like agarwood). So much possibility... and then to shoot oneself in the foot and say "No, I'm not going to use any aldehydes in this," it just seems like a waste of potential.

    Nobody is booing the natural perfumer. It's more like crickets.

    Oh, I didn't realize you claimed authorship to the Dylan comparison. It's a good one!

    I don't care what anyone thinks about a particular fragrance or method of perfumery; they're entitled. I do think that to dismiss an entire category of fragrances, however, is short-sighted, especially when you have very limited experience with it. Luca has proven himself open to trying and reviewing these fragrances and should be commended.

    Personally, I don't care how a fragrance is made. If it smells good, I'm in.

    p.s. Were you referring to Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn? Yes, I liked it, although it would be tiring if all books were written that way.

  9. #9

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    It is funny how when synthetics were first introduced, people made the jump to these scents without looking back. Now here we are over 100 years later, and everyone is lauding naturals, and demonizing synthetics. I personally could care less what goes into the fragrance, as long as it smells good. And as far as allergic reactions; I have hideous allergies, and pollution does not help. Fragrances are the least of my worries.
    If it smells lovely, just wear it, that's how I feel.
    Oh, and not all natural scents smell better, some are just hideous, beyond belief.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

  10. #10

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    Rather than comparing natural perfumery with impressionism or other revolutions of perception, I'd analogize it to religious laws (no pork, fish on Friday, no pictorial representations) which are non-rationally imposed limitations serving to reaffirm the authority of and dedication to the faith. For better or worse, natural perfumery seems to me to be a faith-based endeavor practiced by a small community of believers. On the one hand, there's no rational reason why a little aldehyde shouldn't make a composition brighter or why a pictorial representations wouldn't make a mosque quite pretty. On the other hand the restriction can lead to a beauty all its own (as anybody knows who has, e.g., seen the Mezquita in Cordoba)

    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  11. #11

    Default Re: The Stages of Public Acceptance of Natural Perfumery An Evolution Unfolds in the

    Quote Originally Posted by Minou2 View Post
    Oh, I didn't realize you claimed authorship to the Dylan comparison. It's a good one!


    p.s. Were you referring to Ella Minnow Pea by Mark Dunn? Yes, I liked it, although it would be tiring if all books were written that way.
    Sorry, I'm unfamiliar with that book-- I'll look into it. No, it was a reference to books like "Gadsby" and others. I suppose there are actually several "lipograms" as they're called. They can be interesting as literary novelties but how many of them can be considered great literature?

    Now,with the Dylan thing, I was referring to an old thread about natural perfumery on Basenotes some time ago in which I was having a bit of a back and forth with Anya about natural perfumery. Sure, I was a bit of a jerk referring to natural perfumers jokingly as "Nat-sies", but I did make the point about Bob Dylan-- to which the response seemed to impy that she felt that Bob Dylan DID precisely lose it the moment he went electric-- though I may have misinterpreted it. It just seems like the gears of that analogy have been conveniently scrubbed and regrooved.

    For me, I'd rather hear Bob Dylan songs sung by Peter, Paul and Mary but I guess that's just what I grew up with. (I can't stand Dylan's voice).


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