Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1

    Default tincturing flowers - how to?

    sorry if this is a bit of a repost, but I just can't seem to get a clear answer. When tincturing flowers, does one use the entire flower picked off (w/ the tiny stem a the back), the flower petals and the center area where the seeds and pollen are formed, or just the petals.

    I've had a number of people tell me its just the petals, but once I remove the petals the center area has an equal or even stronger smell of the flower, and it just seems logical the the essential oils are created there, so what do I do? Please only resposes from people who absolutley know 100% or have done this before.

    Also, some websites say to just throw the whole flower in, small stem and all, but that area of the plant does have a distinct grassy smell, and I don't want that to be absorbed into the tincture.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    gido's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Posts
    2,251

    Default Re: tincturing flowers - how to?

    i really dont have a clue, i am only guessing here, but could it be that the stem would introduce to much water?

  3. #3
    ECaruthers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    1,519
    Blog Entries
    22

    Default Re: tincturing flowers - how to?

    I think it depends on the flower. I saved some dried mum blossoms a few years ago and got a nice splash by crushing them into a water-alcohol mixture. The same mums are blooming now & not only the fresh flowers but also the leaves have great smell. I plan to try 3 batches: fresh flowers, dried flowers, and leaves.

    Of course the most famous is iris where it's not the flower at all but the dried and prepared root that's the source of the scent used in commercial perfumery. See The Scent Trail for details. (Of course I'll still try tincturing iris flowers next spring, just to see what happens.)

  4. #4
    gido's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Amsterdam
    Posts
    2,251

    Default Re: tincturing flowers - how to?

    please tell me about tincturing orris root. i am considering a purchase of this stuff, grinded.
    how well will it work to make a tincture of this, will the resulting scent it be anywhere near irisbutter or something different altogether?
    and how exactly is it done?

  5. #5
    ECaruthers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    1,519
    Blog Entries
    22

    Default Re: tincturing flowers - how to?

    I'll quote from Celia Lyttelton's The Scent Trail. As I read the description I kept asking myself, "How did anyone discover such a lengthy and complex process?"

    "...it takes nearly six years to manufacture. It requires three years of cultivation, with frequent hoeing by hand to avoid damaging the rhizomes before they can be harvested, followed by a fortnight's drying in the sun. Then, for two more years, the rhizomes dehydrate in sacks where a chemical reaction occurs, releasing the chetone alpha irone, which is distilled into an essential oil for which there is no synthetic substitute.

    "The rhizomes are then pulverized, macerated in cold water and distilled over and over again for six months, when, after a bit of moderate heating, they eventually produce a rich, buttery concrete known as orris butter, which is further refined into the absolute." NAL paperback edition, pages 122-123.

    Before starting such a process, it might be good to find out which variety of iris is used. I have four kinds of iris growing in my garden and the flowers have four distincly different scents.

  6. #6

    Default Re: tincturing flowers - how to?

    It simply depends on the fragrance you want to capture. When you use only the petals you will not capture the green scent from the sepal and the stem. Dried flowers usualy smell at least a bit different than fresh flowers.

    Using materials with water in it dillute the alcohol, that makes it a less useful solvent and when the amount of alcohol drops below 25% your tincture may even decompose.




Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000