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  1. #1

    Default The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    When I try many perfumes in a short period of time, my nose always get fatigued and I loose a great part of my sense of smell. This also happens when I smell a single perfume for too long or when I overapply perfume near my nose. I also loose my sense of smell when I have a cold or a flu, or when I am near something that causes me allergy, such as dust.

    I think it is very frustrating that our sense of smell is so "fragile", so easily affected by these factors and prone to fatigue. All the other senses are much more robust in this sense. Our sight is affected only when we are exposed to very high levels of light. Our touch is harmed only when there is some serious agression to our bodies. Our taste is resistant to all kinds of foods and almost never gets fatigued. And our hearing is damaged only when you hear very very loud sounds or explosions. Only the sense of smell seems to be so fragile. By simply being exposed to different fragrances, our noses get fatigued. It is not fair!

    Do you also feel frustrated by the limitations of your nose?

    Lucius

    .
    Last edited by LuciusVorenus; 6th August 2008 at 01:10 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    No, not really. as much as I enjoy fragrances, I do not want a cerebral overload or to keep smelling the same scent in the air over and over again. I believe that nose fatigue is a good thing.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilac_chaser

    I posted this a while back. IMO, other senses are less prone to fatigue because they are more dynamic. A sound starts and ends in milliseconds. You can move your eyes just a milimeter and the image you are watching changes. But when the whole office (20 x 20 feet) smells like darn D&G PH for an entire day because my coworker does not know how to use fragrance... then yeah I become nose-blind.
    Last edited by irish; 6th August 2008 at 02:55 AM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    Yes, I have the same concerns about nose fatigue. For one thing, it causes us to apply too much cologne, and then we become the only ones in the room who can't smell it. Embarrassing.
    Also, it's troubling that the sensitivity of the nose can be so harshly affected by even a little stuffiness in the sinuses. If you run into some sinus problems, your basenoter days are over, and your fragrance wardrobe is ruined. A friend of mine completely lost his sense of smell for several months before it came back.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    I know a lot of people will not like to hear this.

    But when you think your nose is "tired", do NOT apply cologne for at least 2 days.
    After those days, you will be surprised....

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    "Two days at least" ... is that a proven fact?

    'Nose fatigue' is not describing what really happens, when we don't notice a smell. At any rate it is mostly not based on weak or deficient smell receptors. It's only our brain and its priority on economizing what messages to pay attention to. Likewise, one sees but will not notice the bug or spider on the wall, the cat under the bush, birds in the tree. However, the moment these move away fast, our brain alerts us, and we see them. It's similar with smells. A constant smell is something your brain will not constantly report to your 'alert zone'. If it would you might get too many impressions to sort out at a time. A certain noise level from the traffic will not be registered after a while. Motors humming , the sound of new tires on your car, often the music in the background: your brain usually shields you from 100 sensual impressions each and every moment. It filters these to allow only the most important ones to come to your attention. It's an automatic thing to allow you to concentrate on what's important for survival. But when constant sounds suddenly stop - you may notice something missing (with relief).

    Leave your space, go for a walk in your lunch break, and it may happen that you smell your perfume again, for moments at least. It's always been there, but the fresh air gave your mind a break and then registered it as a change in nose impressions. Didn't you notice that everybodies home has a smell, except your own? You'll catch the smell of your own place only after a longer absence, as you'll really notice how your shirt etc. smells after you have removed it from your body for quite a while.
    Last edited by narcus; 7th August 2008 at 06:41 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi č un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    "Two days at least" ... is that a proven fact?

    'Nose fatigue' is not describing what really happens, when we don't notice a smell. At any rate it is mostly not based on weak or deficient smell receptors. It's only our brain and its priority on economizing what messages to pay attention to. Likewise, one sees but will not notice the bug or spider on the wall, the cat under the bush, birds in the tree. However, the moment these move away fast, our brain alerts us, and we see them. It's similar with smells. A constant smell is something your brain will not constantly report to your 'alert zone'. If it would you might get too many impressions to sort out at a time. A certain noise level from the traffic will not be registered after a while. Motors humming , the sound of new tires on your car, often the music in the background: your brain usually shields you from 100 sensual impressions each and every moment. It filters these to allow only the most important ones to come to your attention. It's an automatic thing to allow you to concentrate on what's important for survival. But when constant sounds suddenly stop - you may notice something missing (with relief).

    Leave your space, go for a walk in your lunch break, and it may happen that you smell your perfume again, for moments at least. It's always been there, but the fresh air gave your mind a break and then registered it as a change in nose impressions. Didn't you notice that everybodies home has a smell, except your own? You'll catch the smell of your own place only after a longer absence, as you'll really notice how your shirt etc. smells after you have removed it from your body for quite a while.
    Thanks Narcus. Fascinating. You are so correct on the home thing and also stepping outside after being in a building and your scent catches new wings under your nose. My home smells amazing after leaving for several days. It is comforting to return to that smell.
    Last edited by Jock_With_Scents; 7th August 2008 at 07:21 PM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    "Two days at least" ... is that a proven fact?

    'Nose fatigue' is not describing what really happens, when we don't notice a smell. At any rate it is mostly not based on weak or deficient smell receptors. It's only our brain and its priority on economizing what messages to pay attention to. Likewise, one sees but will not notice the bug or spider on the wall, the cat under the bush, birds in the tree. However, the moment these move away fast, our brain alerts us, and we see them. It's similar with smells. A constant smell is something your brain will not constantly report to your 'alert zone'. If it would you might get too many impressions to sort out at a time. A certain noise level from the traffic will not be registered after a while. Motors humming , the sound of new tires on your car, often the music in the background: your brain usually shields you from 100 sensual impressions each and every moment. It filters these to allow only the most important ones to come to your attention. It's an automatic thing to allow you to concentrate on what's important for survival. But when constant sounds suddenly stop - you may notice something missing (with relief).

    Leave your space, go for a walk in your lunch break, and it may happen that you smell your perfume again, for moments at least. It's always been there, but the fresh air gave your mind a break and then registered it as a change in nose impressions. Didn't you notice that everybodies home has a smell, except your own? You'll catch the smell of your own place only after a longer absence, as you'll really notice how your shirt etc. smells after you have removed it from your body for quite a while.
    Very interesting.

    So could it be that all perfumes/colognes/fragrances have good longevity and sillage in some way? And the frags that we can constantly smell with great sillage (Black Aoud), what about them? Are they simply so overpowering that our nose needs to constantly make us aware that it is there?

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Sense of Smell and Fatigue

    Quote Originally Posted by JBL View Post
    Very interesting.

    So could it be that all perfumes/colognes/fragrances have good longevity and sillage in some way? And the frags that we can constantly smell with great sillage (Black Aoud), what about them? Are they simply so overpowering that our nose needs to constantly make us aware that it is there?
    I don't know. I notice various strengths with colognes right from the start. Sillage comes and goes as we move about, and is noticed more by others than by ourselves anyway, it's our trail in the air. And I do not think I notice my Black Aoud all the hours of the day. It comes and goes. Fragrances which are more to the skin cause the least 'fatigue' I believe. Based on what I've learned about it, I never use fragrance in the face or on the neck. Top of my head (hair) , wrist , inside of my jacket sleeve (a Turin recommendation that works) are my favorites. Try parts of your legs, if you sit a lot, and remeber: what ends on the hairy parts cabbot disappear into the skin. It took me a little time to find the best spots systematically. But it was fun, and costs nothing. To please others, of course, it's different: wear perfume wherever you want to be kissed, ..mouth excepted, dear Catherine Deneuve!
    Last edited by narcus; 8th August 2008 at 05:59 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi č un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

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