Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 8 of 8
  1. #1

    Default How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    I was wondering about this because it seems to me that Cuba Orange is a less sweet version of Dunhill Desire. If I were to create a fragrance using synthetics, what are the rules of thumb with regard to sweetness?
    Thanks.

  2. #2

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    No idea with synthetics, sadly. With naturals, the difficulty is often the opposite - it seems most synthetics are far sweeter than their natural counterparts and it's hard to sweeten up a natural fragrance to make it more "designer/niche like" without messing with the formula too much, or relying on the old standbys of vanilla, tonka, tolu balsam or benzoin. Of course, those alter the overall structure of the blend and is rarely ideal.

    I'm interested to hear the responses here. I suppose one easy one fix would be "use some naturals."

  3. #3

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    How about using some sugar! LOL.

  4. #4

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    If only, if only!

  5. #5

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    And vanillin ? David, where are you ?
    Last edited by Night; 10th August 2008 at 07:57 AM.
    L'amour fait songer, vivre et croire. Il a, pour réchauffer le coeur, un rayon de plus que la gloire; et ce rayon, c'est le bonheur. (Victor HUGO)

  6. #6

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    Another question: suppose you want a strong vanilla fragrance that is not very sweet and at least a little dry? Would using patchouli and vanillin do this?

  7. #7

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    Way too broad of a question I think, Bigsly, at least without detailing the scent some more. You could take a woodsy approach to it, and combine vanilla with a more subdued wood like blue cypress, or sneak it in with some spices (cardamom and clove get fairly close to the woody/spicy bean smell of vanilla). You can even emulate scents in certain areas with other oils - coumarin rich lavender absolute can, carefully blended, not appear as lavender at all but add a nice vanilla roundness and sweetness to the top notes.

  8. #8

    Default Re: How do you control sweetness in a fragrance?

    I have five different vanilla fragrant oils and all of them vary in sweetness. When I'm creating a vanilla fragrance, I tend to use vanilla absolute blended with a not too sugary sweet vanilla fragrant oil. I also play around with vanilla like scents such as benzoin and tiny tinges of wood notes. I find sandalwood in tiny amounts work quite nice with vanilla and brings it out a bit.

    I'm also a fan of that edible, delicious scent of vanilla so I add hints of almond, honey and hazelnut to the mix.

    I think the best thing to do is get yourself some different vanilla scents and you might find that adding a bit of vanilla B with vanilla A could create the perfect balance of sweetness for you.

Similar Threads

  1. Any civet fans out there?
    By costello in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: 27th November 2013, 08:10 PM
  2. Designer or Niche: A Reevaluation (very long post)
    By scentemental in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 119
    Last Post: 2nd December 2011, 04:58 PM
  3. List of 2008 fragrance releases - which ones are you excited about?
    By mikeperez23 in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 70
    Last Post: 1st August 2008, 06:19 PM
  4. List of 2008 fragrance releases - which ones are you excited about?
    By mikeperez23 in forum Female Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 2nd January 2008, 05:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000