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  1. #31

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    There is a chemical that smells like hot iron, but I'm damned if I can remember its name.
    One of the synthetic musks, but I forget which...

  2. #32
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    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by DrSmellThis View Post
    One of the synthetic musks, but I forget which...
    Habanolide. Clean shirt under a hot iron. You can try aldehyde C11 undecanal too, at very high dilution.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by AK3D View Post
    Ruh Khus (Vetiver) will last well over 12 hours. Other oils more (like Ouds) or less (citruses), depending on their type. I haven't tried jasmine yet, but I aim to find out this week
    Hi AK, Is this the pure Khus you are talking about or the Khus attar for longevity. I was planning to blend myself with the pure vetiver absolute as well as with Mysore sandalwood. I don't know if its pure Mysore oil, but have to try.

    Do you have any experience with KSDL sandal wood oil or the KDFC oil. Pl share your thoughts.

  4. #34

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Bartlett View Post
    Another way to extend citrus is to use intermediate materials that have similar notes: so for example use lemongrass or petitgrain from the same type of citrus.

    I feel as thought I've written all that before, more than once, so perhaps it's time for a blog post on the subject . . .
    I've also read that Litsea cubeba eo is a less-volatile citrus option. Do you find that to be true?

    A blog post sounds great!

    On another note, any idea what's in this Canvas/Concrete "fragrance primer" product (https://www.canvasandconcrete.com/), and whether or not it is legit?

  5. #35

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Not Chris, but IMHO, litsea is great for this purpose. Another tool in the chest to have.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    Quote Originally Posted by leathermountain View Post
    I've also read that Litsea cubeba eo is a less-volatile citrus option. Do you find that to be true?

    A blog post sounds great!

    On another note, any idea what's in this Canvas/Concrete "fragrance primer" product (https://www.canvasandconcrete.com/), and whether or not it is legit?
    Litsea cubeba (sometimes sold as May Chang) and Lemongrass are both mainly Citral, which is what makes them effective in extending citrus so all three are good options.

    Iíve not had time for much blogging for a while but feel free to remind me about this idea if I donít get to it in the next few weeks.

    The idea of a fragrance primer is a great marketing gimmick but it really isnít going to do very much good. Fragrance isnít lost because your skin eats it but because it evaporates - if it didnít you couldnít smell it - of the fragrance that is lost to things other than evaporation itís mostly abraded off with dead skin cells. Iím sure this wonít do any harm but seriously doubt it will have a measurable effect that is greater than, say, using your ordinary moisturiser.

    Honestly if you want to have your fragrance last all night you have two choices: wear a fragrance that has been made to last or carry a top-up and re-spray.
    ďA person who is nice to you, but rude to the waiter, is not a nice person
    ― Dave Barry

    Chris Bartlett
    Perfumes from the edge . . .

    www.perfumedesigner.co.uk
    Twitter: @PellWallPerfume

    If you are looking for a perfumery consultation Iím happy to quote: if you want free advice, thatís what these forums are for
    You can also join my blog if you wish to ask questions of me.

  7. #37

    Default Re: Fixatives and the Fleeting Scent

    You may try lemon myrtle as a bridge into the heart to help a lemon scent have more of a drydown period. Diluted orange peel wax works for orange and grapefruit, and, as Arctander wrote, is great for fixing highly-priced florals.

    Very low intensity oils such as copaiba balsam, gurjun, elemi or mastic can do wonders, while not muddying the top notes.
    That's just off the top of my head.
    Anya McCoy - http://anyasgarden.com/
    Best of the Best awards - Perfume: MoonDance, StarFlower, Amberess, Light, Royal Lotus and as
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    First Artisan Perfumer Voted in as member of the American Society of Perfumery 2013

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