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  1. #1

    Default For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    From wikipedia:

    In chemistry, isomers are compounds with the same molecular formula but different structural formulae[1] Isomers do not necessarily share similar properties unless they also have the same functional groups.

    Basically two compounds with the same basic ingredients looking similar but different based on their final assembly.

    Black Aoud: Oud, rose, musk, patchouli
    VdR: Rose, musk, patchouli

    My decant of Black Aoud came in from perfumedcourt today. Checked the mail, took a shower, sprayed it on. This is going to sound a little weird but the oud opening was the best part for me! I loved the raw, medicinal smell, very earthy. This might just be me but I smelled something a little like honey in the opening, started having Serge Lutens flashbacks. However the exotic opening fades to a soft rose and dusty patchouli on my skin. The rose is neither masculine nor feminine and the patchouli isn't a warm, golden type, it's more thin and dry if this makes any sense. There is an 'expensive soap' vibe to the drydown that I'm not really taking a liking to.

    I know there is alot of talk about BA, Rose 31, and No 88 and their similarities and differences. But I never see any talk of the relation to VdR. They don't smell alike, but their drydowns have the exact same notes: Rose and patchouli. It's very interesting to me how two well made scents with the exact same notes smell so radically different.

    I must say after all the hype I am slightly let down. I expected more of a dark, woody, musky drydown with BA, some sensual brute ravishing my nose. Don't get me wrong, I love the rose smell but I'm left asking, is this all to it? On my skin it doesn't seem like there is any masculine note balancing the rose, it's still very wearable but I can't really see myself wearing this anywhere but around the house or for short errands. I would never, ever wear this to work. Maybe a formal dinner, but I'm not sure. The longevity is fantastic, my skin normally destroys rose notes and it's going strong about 7 hours later.


    I guess my next question is this: I love the opening, which Montale just punches you in the face with oud and keeps the smell well into the drydown?

  2. #2

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    I've not smelled Black Aoud, so keep that in mind, but Original Aoud is very aoudy, with very few supporting notes. It starts out warm and medicinal and turns into a dry/sandy/woody smell which most closely smells like labdanum with a bit of the grassiness of vetiver. I don't know if it's the same aoud smell in Black Aoud but it is the same aoud I've noticed in many other Montale frags (Sliver Aoud, Crystal Aoud, Golden Aoud, etc).

    It's very very dry and warm. Meditative, I'd say. If that sounds like the component you like from Black Aoud, I'd definitely say it's worth sampling. One of the best 'dry wood' scents I've smelled, and the only Montale I've sniffed yet that I'd ever consider owning.
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  3. #3

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Pyramid of notes... 80% of the time I really do not pay much attention to them as they rarelly tell you much about a perfume you have not smelled.

  4. #4

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    are they constitutional or stereoisomers?

  5. #5

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    I've not smelled Black Aoud, so keep that in mind, but Original Aoud is very aoudy, with very few supporting notes. It starts out warm and medicinal and turns into a dry/sandy/woody smell which most closely smells like labdanum with a bit of the grassiness of vetiver. I don't know if it's the same aoud smell in Black Aoud but it is the same aoud I've noticed in many other Montale frags (Sliver Aoud, Crystal Aoud, Golden Aoud, etc).

    It's very very dry and warm. Meditative, I'd say. If that sounds like the component you like from Black Aoud, I'd definitely say it's worth sampling. One of the best 'dry wood' scents I've smelled, and the only Montale I've sniffed yet that I'd ever consider owning.
    Sounds perfect. I don't know if I have a bad batch but the 'Aoud' in Black Aoud seems like a misnomer to me. It's just rose, rose, rose, and a little patchouli on the edge. The longevity and sillage is fantastic, I can walk out of my bedroom and come back a few minutes later and I still smell it, but this might be the fragrance equivalent of an awesome guitar riff being played over and over and over. Great at first, but I'm sort of scratching my head at this point. I'm actually going to go take a shower to wash it off and try another sample, make sure my nose is still working lol

  6. #6

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    "Rose, musk, and patchouli" being notes are, in themselves, very broad What type of these ingredients, in how much, and is there an emphasis placed on these notes? Not all times will perfumers reveal ALL of their ingredients -- only the main ones. Underlying spices and florals, for example, may add a little oomph to the notes (while not being detectable by the nose); but they are not always listed. Sauvignonne, by Ginestet, is one of those scents which you can pick up the top notes easily, but some of the "behind-the-curtains" magic is more mysterious, while on the other hand, a scent like Antidote, by V&R, whose ingredients are listed plain-as-daylight, is one you would've sworn to never have picked out so many notes in. So, while the ingredients are listed as the same, the scent may not be. I've smelled and reviewed both Black Aoud and VdR as well, and they were not quite the same to me.

    Also, I urge you to try Domenico Caraceni 1913 if you feel that Black Aoud is lacking something. I felt the same thing - but DC1913 is the complete picture for me.
    Last edited by Leifer; 28th August 2008 at 01:26 AM.

  7. #7

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Fragrances like Black Aoud and Voleur de Roses are mixtures not compounds. So they are not isomers.

  8. #8

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    for an oud extreme by Montale try Aoud Lime.

  9. #9

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Another fragrance that shares some characteristics with Black Aoud, and therefore I feel is related to it, is Noir de Noir by Tom Ford.

  10. #10

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    I feel VdR and BA are pretty similar, even if the BA is a little heavier. They're very much the same kind of scent.

  11. #11

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Funny, I didn't like either Black Aoud or Veleurr de Roses. Must be a coincidence.

  12. #12

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Quote Originally Posted by scentsitivity View Post
    Fragrances like Black Aoud and Voleur de Roses are mixtures not compounds. So they are not isomers.
    Yeah, good point. I'm sure the article meant one of the molecules is some isomer of another.

  13. #13

    Default Re: For my fellow science nerds: Black Aoud is an isomer of Voleur De Roses

    Quote Originally Posted by shalashaska View Post
    .... I would never, ever wear this to work. Maybe a formal dinner, but I'm not sure.

    [2] - I guess my next question is this: I love the opening, which Montale just punches you in the face with oud and keeps the smell well into the drydown?
    (1) I have never, ever even thought about wearing it work.

    (2)
    Not wanting to sound smart: Black Aoud !
    I get oudh all the way through, but it becomes 'less' noticeable towards the end. I wear pure oudhs occasionally, and all oudhs get mellow and warm, even slightly sweet, after the first hour or so. It's part of their quality to develop in this direction. One that stays harsher even towards the end: Aoud Cuir d'Arabie. It's the driest smelling leather I own, without birch tar and whatever went into the curing and perfuming of leathers, centuries ago, in Europe. You may also want to try Royal Aoud, which is oudh only.
    Voleur de Roses and Black Aoud are so different in mood or vibrations that I never saw them together. But I find it interesting what you said, and will try and compare their dry down phase one day.
    Last edited by narcus; 28th August 2008 at 07:58 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi č un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

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