Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 19 of 19
  1. #1

    Default mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Dear basenoters,

    I was recently blessed with a gracious amount of samples, and henceforth, I have decided to do a second installment of a mega-compilation of mini-reviews. A big thank you to Alex, who urged me to form this compilation, and also who generously provided me with some truly astouding fragrances. Hats off to you! And without further ado, let's hop right into it.

    Edit: I forgot to include this passage, but if anybody wants me to review any fragrances they have samples of, feel free to contact me via PM and we can set something up. It gives me a chance to contribute to this community, as well as work on my writing.

    ===

    The Scent of Peace by Bond No. 9

    Unbelievable. Absolutely breath-taking, awe-inspiring, and passionate - quite possibly one of the most gorgeous scents in the entire world. Perhaps it is my skin chemistry, which fuels my insatiable lust for citrus and fruit-based scents (given close to nothing at all works on me besides those two, seriously! ); it however does not matter. My opinion is completely and totally irrelevant and useless in this equation, because whether or not you like it, I can tell you why it is one of the most stunning fragrances in the world:

    We all have morals and values in our lives, which we hold dear; some may feel one thing, and others may feel another, but one thing we can all mutually identify is the value of tranquility in life, and the infinite amount of love we can find in the world around us. Whatever appeals to our senses; be it sound, sight, or scent - our ability to understand the concept behind any form of art is the driving force behind our healthy emotions. Some of us love painting; artists like Da Vinci and Picasso are inspiring to both the mind and the soul. Others, may find a cultivation of wisdom through music - but whatever it may be, there is one thing that reigns true: imagery is conveyed in any format; and those of us who value the philosophy behind scent creation will know exactly what I am speaking of. In fact, I think all of us as basenoters, owe it to ourselves to sit down and really find out what impact fragrances have had in our lives.

    To me, this is not a fragrance. It is an expression of me; of who I am - down to the very way I smile and look at people. Everything about this scent encompasses how I feel on a day-to-day basis. The brilliance shimmering from the debut of grapefruit and blackcurrant, which gleams with eloquence in the midst of awe-inspiring lily of the valley, and misty whispers of jasmine, to the transparent musk and therapeutic cedarwood, which firmly anchor the scent into a long-lasting reality - it all has meaning beyond ingredient composure and chemical properties. There is no black-and-white way of looking at such niche fragrances, because these scents are beyond superficial expressions like that. The heart of a soul is needed for endeavors such as this. There is such a pulsating presence of love and kindness encompassed in this scent; it is truly a gift and a message. This is not only how I want to smell; it is how I want people to see, hear, and understand what my philosophy of life is.

    Overall rating: */10.

    ===

    Blue Amber by Montale

    It's been quite a while since I've smelled a fragrance revolved around amber; and, to be honest, there's a reason I haven't smelled them in a while. The delicacy needed to ensure it's not too heavy, and not too transparent, is beyond just the amber. Supporting ingredients can make or break the scent just as well as the main ingredient, which unfortunately, is quite often the letdown. But, if you love amber incessantly, and have been wanting the perfect, intellectual blend of modern ingenuity with classic sophistication, then look no further. This is for the Tony Stark's of amber-lovers the world over, and it will be your Iron Man suit. Slabs of warm amber cuddle with gooey vanilla in a brilliant show of affection, with generously balanced notes of bergamot, geranium, coriander, patchouli, and vetiver, to guide the scent with pride and dignity. This isn't an amber scent in the sense that the focus is solely on the beauty of one particular note; it's more of a spin on amber from different viewpoints. Each ingredient has something to offer - a little whisper of it's influence, towards the most well-rounded amber scent I've ever smelled.

    Quote Originally Posted by LuckyScent.com
    the way amber softly exudes, the way it warms to your skin and becomes your own impossibly beautiful scent with no “perfumey” fake edge, all of these rare charms are here in spades
    LuckyScent's description is something I wish to elaborate on, because it is so very true. The raw potency and enormous complexity the amber has just by itself is what makes it smell so real. It doesn't feel like a fragrance that you're wearing, it almost feels alive with your body. It's literally amber and vanilla (with the supporting ingredients) in liquid form, thriving on your skin and radiating their naturally mesmerizing scents. There really is nothing here that gives it away as being a "scent" or a "fragrance", it merely emits it's deific odor.

    Overall rating: 10/10.

    ===

    Bleecker Street by Bond No. 9

    Violet leaves burst abloom in full-floral sweetness, as spiced accords of blackcurrant and a delicately placed thyme note crawl through the nose and caress the olfactory senses. The balance between the three top notes is incredible; each one is soft and delicate, yet each presence is felt strongly because none of the notes drown each other out. It gets even more unbelievable though, when the brisk notes of cedarwood mingle with warm, soothing cinnamon, and form an unforgettable passage into the soul of this fragrance. The heart is a grand conjuration of all of the beauty in this scent. Radiating warmth and comfort, the delicate jasmine relaxes the body, while piney notes of cedarwood and cinnamon invigorate the mind, giving this scent it's powerful, incense-like quality. This just transformed from a fragrance into a Kiton suit - it suddenly empowers you, and embraces your sense of courage* and amplifies it. Just in time is a powerful burst of frosty oakmoss, whose vibrancy electrifies the scent. Coupled with light wafts of vanilla, the base manages to maintain it's perfect balance between the florals, woods, and sweet spices -- and finally, we realize that the scent has not changed since the first spray and sniff.

    This scent is absolutely perfect, in the sense that it's all relative. Every progressive note is an evolution; a shade stronger or a touch lighter than before, but with a slightly different ingredient to skew the perspective. In most fragrances, the top/heart/base notes all vary in smell (duh, different ingredients!), but Bleecker Street captivates the senses through a transformation of very similar notes, into a fragrance of such immense depth and charismatic stature. On paper, it looks like a pretty linear scent, but Bond No. 9 have managed to work a tremendous amount of complexity into something that would've otherwise been very stale.

    Overall: 10/10.

    *: Trivia question: One of these ingredients was used in [an] ancient culture as incense, because they felt it gave them courage. Which culture was it?

    ===

    Red Vetyver by Montale

    I've always considered Montale to be a sort of gentle giant; he is undeniably one of the most creative and inspiring perfumers in the world, along with our other high-ranking house favorites - but Pierre Montale especially has always amazed me. His ingenious methods of contrasting ingredients as a way of emphasizing an overall tone is, for a lack of more effective words, simply unbelievable. Red Vetyver is a perfect example of otherwise black-and-white ingredients, used to paint a rainbow of notation in a fragrance. Vetiver, cedarwood, patchouli, grapefruit, elemi, and black pepper -- is this going to be a spiced scent with citrus-sweetness and earthy-green notes on a curtain of woods? No, not quite.

    This is death metal composed by Mozart*; beautifully soft and humble notes of vetiver vicariously strum their green accords in tune with richly spiced cedar and black pepper - a mix that gives off such deep contrast to these notes, that it doesn't even matter what this scent has in it, because it smells so incredibly alive. It has a certain pulsating quality, as if it's got it's own heart, and each beat is a glorious tidal wave of warm vetiver. The spices are done properly too; the pepper and cedar combo does give off a "red" feel for this scent; they both have this energetic vibe, like they're sizzling on your skin, and between wafts of vetiver you get a kick in the teeth from this.

    Overall rating: 10/10.

    *: Now that we're on the subject of music, if you guys really want to hear death metal written by Mozart, check this out
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfslLWySZYg
    ===

    Chocolate Greedy by Montale

    Mmm, this is delicious! Even the ingredients list looks like a recipe. Moka bean (what is that?) bitter orange, cacao cream, and vanilla -- but not just ANY vanilla, it's from Madagascar! (Surprise surprise, they're the largest exporters of natural vanilla). The initial spray is a tidal wave of dark chocolate, drenching the olfactory senses with warm, fudgy notes of bitter orange and sweet, heavenly cacao cream. It's not overpowering, either - sure, it feels like I snorted a line of hot chocolate mix when I first sprayed it, but that's as extreme as it goes. That's saying quite a lot, considering candied scents are often disastrously strong (*COUGH* A-Men *COUGH*), and also because this comes from Montale.

    But it isn't extreme at all. It's warm and it's tingly; it's that fragrant melted chocolate you put on your s'more when you sit in front of the campfire on a perfect summer's night, or that irresistible waft of home-made fudge brewing in the back when you walk through the doors of the Willy Wonka factory. It's deliciously chocolately and richly appetizing for hours on end -- and the best part is, it stays unbelievably close to the skin. There is an intense amount of longevity in this fragrance (I applied at 3pm yesterday, and it's now noon the next day and I can still pick up faint notes) but the sillage is, thankfully, not as powerful. It's quite a pleasant surprise; like the darker, more exquisite chocolate version of Jaipur. There is a certain youthful jubilance in this scent that makes it so relaxed and perfect for casual nights out; it doesn't try too hard to be the epitome of chocaholic scents, and that's what makes it so much fun to wear.

    Overall rating: 9/10.

    Trivia question: Two-thirds of the world's cocoa comes from which African country?

    ===

    Wall Street by Bond No. 9

    Since Chez Bond ripped off GIT from Creed, would it stand to reason that Wall Street, then, must be a rip-off of MI? Erolfa? SMW? A combination maybe; __ + __ ? Okay, whatever. With the amount of hit-and-miss fragrances in the market today, it's reasonable to assume that there should be "rip-offs" of the ones that have greatness to them - and that's what people tend to think of. How many reviews have you read that say "smells like ___, but more ___ and less ___" ? Probably quite a bit. I understand the need for networking scents and grouping them together, but the point is to find differences, not similarities. I can't sit here reviewing Wall Street if I'm thinking of all the scents it smells similar to, otherwise I'd tell you it's a mix of Polo Blue, Azzaro Chrome, Ocean Pacific, Cool Water, and Erolfa. Now where would we be with a mixture like that? Probably in a very fragrant Hell The point is: it doesn't matter if it smells like something else; for every similarity you can find, try to find a difference. They may play the same song, but with different instruments, there's a world of differences for you to discover.

    Wall Street's lighthearted and watery opening has a unique feel to it; it's strangely powerful and rigid without being overamplified, so the initial crispness you feel right after spraying it on doesn't fade after a couple minutes; it prolongs itself throughout the scent and never seems to yield. Partially responsible is the heart; whose soft, airy ozone coupled with watery marine notes adds the perfect blush to the base notes. It's fixation on the dilation of musks, vetiver, and ambergris through aquatic-like notes creates a sort of yin and yang for this scent; the dependency is mutual, and the perfection of one is thanks to the other. This lasts like a heavy scent does, but it maintains it's nonchalant poise with water-like flexibility. I don't think this scent could have been more balanced; it's light and subtle, but also unforgettable and vastly intriguing to the nose.

    Overall rating: 9/10.

    ===

    Chez Bond by Bond No. 9

    Weird, did I already write a review on this? Oh that's right, I already did! It's my Cool Water review. For those of you who want to check it out, here's the link (for those who don't, skinny version is down there):

    http://community.basenotes.net/showthread.php?t=203518

    While Chez Water and Cool Bond () are identical at first; they do have some differences between the lines. Chez is a a more mature version of both GIT and CW; all the things we disliked about those fragrances, are now blemished away. It's softer on the florals and sweeter on the greens; a strange kind of balance is in this formula. I know they're the exact same scents, but the mere fact that this is the third generation of the exact same scent negates the importance of any "originals" or, even, brand names - because they're all pretty much brothers. Although they are all closely related, they do have some minor differences. GIT's sharp lemon and verbena combo also elevate the green-ness of it's heart, giving off and overall lively feel, as opposed to Cool Water's serene orchestra of soft woods and aromatic flowers.

    We could go on and on about technical differences of the two and how one, somehow, is superior to the other - but the point is they're all awesome. I love the fact that this formula has been redone so greatly three separate times. I love GIT for it's exuberant vibe, and I love CW for how velvety the heart is - and now I love this for how mature and developed it feels. It'd be like having fragrance triplets in my wardrobe: they're all the same until you get to know them. Those who love GIT and love CW will most definitely find a respect for this scent - if they can get past the pricetag

    Overall rating: 9/10.

    Trivia question: A flagship store for what perfume company sits on Bond street? (The street this particular fragrance was named after)

    ===

    White Goldskin by Ramon Molvizar

    Breezes of soft orange, dashes of light lemon, and hints of bergamot christen the welcoming of our next scent. A fantastically soft opening resting on what appears to be a velvety note of violet; this scent reminds me greatly of Equistrius, by Parfum d'Empire (which is, hands down, the single best female perfume ever made. Ever. ). Upon the unusually quick dissipation of the top notes, an oakmoss creeps up and doubles with the violet to give a rich texture to the fragrance, allowing the transition into a more woodsy/floral feel to the scent. The soft mix of light citrus on earthy beds is not unusual, but the thing about this scent is, there's an underlying buttery note of ambrette in the heart, which softens up the woods tremendously, and allows the scent to transform itself into something uniquely soft, yet powerful at the same time. The heart is a sharpened version of Grey Flannel; but with more sophistication - thanks to the citrus notes (which cut through ambrette more easily than woodsy notes) and more discreet execution

    Actually, that was all an interpretation; I couldn't find anything in a quick search on Google about the notes in this fantastic scent. However, I did spend an entire day (literally, three reapplications throughout the day and night!) dissecting the scent, so if there's a mistake on the notes, let me know and I'll fix them.

    Overall rating: 8/10.

    Trivia question: One of these ingredients is used in about a third of all male fragrances, and about half of female perfumes. Which essential oil is it?

    ===

    Fougeres Marines by Montale

    There's unfortunately not a whole lot to say about Montale's spin on the classic fougere theme; it's very well done, but on my skin, it just doesn't last, and it never develops how I'd like it to. It feels like quite a lazy scent, in the sense that the ingredients just sit on your skin and never really do anything spectacular -- which is fine, considering it's a wonderful, fresh scent. However, the salty breath of lavender hushes up most of the green in this scent, preventing any real development. I wish there were more, but there really isn't.

    But perhaps that's how the scent is supposed to be; did Montale intend to make a passive scent? His heart was definitely in the design; the quality and balance of the ingredients is a dead giveaway of his genius, but maybe that's the downfall of this scent. To my nose, it should be something different. Something more green and lively; a unique saltwater approach to the ferns and florals - but it is the exact opposite. It's oriented towards the vast oceans, whose tides carry whispers of distant herbal life in their salty breezes. Don't get me wrong, I think it's a great scent. Montale is full of surprises, but sometimes they are not quite what we expected. This is sort of a Mugler Cologne for the niche-hungry, who find life by the ocean and in nature to be infinitely inspirational.

    Overall rating: 7/10.

    Trivia question: Where did the inspiration for the modern-day "Fougere" classification come from? (Hint: It's an old fragrance)

    ===

    Millesime Imperial by Creed

    I'm usually a fan of citrus scents, since they work incredibly on my skin, but there's something about Millesime Imperial that rubs me the wrong way. The oriental approach to mixing light fruits and rich spices is disarming at first, but also very comforting in a strange way. The bold composition gives this scent a unique aura; you just can't help but feel this was inspired somewhere in the Middle-East. Aromatic wafts of citrus lay on salty oceanic accords, flattening the sharp tones, while musk and woods begin to dominate the scent early on in the heart notes. The composure is so elegant and formal; but within that, it is unfortunately oh so boring. There is a prevalent flatness and monotony to the scent, that simply disconnects the wearer from the fragrance. There is nothing particular about this scent that makes it great; I can't tell you what I like about it - and that's why I can't stand it. The fact that I can only relate to this fragrance by spraying it on my skin and forgetting about it, almost makes me one in the same with the millions of people who are driven to fragrance by the image of what it is.

    I'm not saying that due to my fragrance knowledge or status on BaseNotes, that I'm better with fragrances than anybody else out there in the world, but look at it this way: if you were to ask Average-Joe on the streets why he wears his AdG, he'd tell you because it smells good. And if you were to ask any basenoter, what would they say? If you asked me why I wear what I wear, then I'd sit you down and paint seductive portraits of luscious fragrances that emulate feelings and emotions; that capture the exquisite beauty in this art, and that exemplify who I am in image. The sheer amount of attention to detail that we, as fragrance junkies, demand out of fragrances, is what is the ultimate make-or-break deal for the common fragrances, and the niche fragrances. Millesime Imperial, to me, is a beautiful girl with no personality. It is a niche rarity; a scent with promising potential, from one of the world's most respectable parfumeurs, that has gone wrong. The ingredients support what would be a terrific idea for a scent, but the failure lies with the lack of individuality. It almost feels as if Millesime Imperial was created by a robot.

    Overall rating: 6/10.

    Trivia question: Creed created this scent for whom? (Bonus: Another very famous niche designer also creates perfumes for the same line of royalty, who is he?)

    ===

    Eau de New York by Bond No. 9

    I'm still trying to make up my mind on whether or not I can give a neutral rating on this scent, or give it a thumbs-down. You see, it's not that the scent smells bad, it's just that there's too much of the same thing. Look at the opening: citrus, citrus, citrus, and more citrus oil. The heart is sweet florals with a touch of citrus, and the base notes are all earthy-green. Sure, the composition is there, and the ingredients aren't bad, but the final product in bottled-form is enough to make you think twice about this scent. The exclusive focus on citrus and florals leaves this scent feeling superficial; it's just two shades of gray, with no real substance in it. The things you feel like you SHOULD be smelling just aren't there, and it makes this scent feel so flat. It needs some fizz, something to fill the gaps and transcend the top to the heart, and the heart to the base, more stylishly. But given the numerous ingredients and the intense similarities, there's not much room for much else.

    And that, ultimately, is the downfall of this fragrance. There's such a tremendous assortment of ingredients that each have their own say in how the scent feels and smells, but it never has any real development. Nothing stands out as unique or bold; there's no unusual spin on ingredients or composure. Sure, it's a good scent, but there should be more for the price, and especially the brand name.

    Overall rating: 5/10.

    ===

    Andy Warhol Silver Factory by Bond No. 9

    Pardon my language, as I hate to be blatantly rude, but there's simply no other way of describing this scent. It's bitter, sour, acidic, and nasty. Remember that fat kid you had in your high-school P.E. class, the one who would never wear deodorant, but would liberally apply Axe after sweating profusely? This is that putrid stench, collected by wringing out those greasy shirts he never washed but always sweat in. Nothing at all is proportionate here; the dry smoke, the harsh woods, the flat jasmine, and the sharp cedar - it all becomes one compilation of multiple ingredients, instead of them unifying to form one distinct scent. This mixture has potential; it's not like Bond No. 9 do not have the talent or determination to do so, I just think this scent was a huge letdown in the effort department.

    Bond No. 9 is full of surprises; Bleecker Street and The Scent of Peace were such fantastic scents with nothing wrong, but there has to be the lemon(s) of the bunch, right? This would be it then; if, for some reason, you feel like instantly acquiring a hangover (sans the drinking), all you need is a spray of Andy Warhol Silver Factory.

    Overall rating: 2/10.

    ===

    Gift Homme by Ramon Molvizar

    Quote Originally Posted by Ramon Molvizar
    "Men also have feelings, even though they may not be able to show them for fear of not being understood. However with Gift Homme, they all flow in search of passionate love."
    What in the hell? Are you serious? That's probably the most blatant display of false effort for a description I've EVER read anywhere. Yes, boys, if you are in search of passionate love, you need to buy this cologne because it will help you overcome your fears of people not understanding your emotions. Or, you could just buy a better cologne - because this one sucks. It's debut is reminiscent of plastic that was burned the day before, with virtually no heart and no base. Thankfully, too, because spraying this on was definitely not a gift as much as it was a curse. I'm glad it lasted for only an hour, with no notation change whatsoever, because I don't think I would want to wear this much longer than that.

    I wish I could go a little more in-depth, but I really can't. In the initial spray, there's an overburdening presence of rubbing alcohol, following by the harsh and sour smell of either burned plastic, or poorly mixed "woods" (which happens to be an ingredient in this "fragrance"), and that's all there is to it.

    Overall rating: 1/10.

    ===

    Roadster by Cartier

    Yuck! Pasty glue mixed with exceptionally unpleasant vegetable compost that has been oversprayed with Le Male. Roadster doesn't have much to it, it's monotonous and dead. A blend of chemicals mixed with the purpose of pushing brand-name colognes in a market full of consumers hungry for designer labels. A bad time to review a bad fragrance, because let's be honest for a moment: There's no way in hell this can stack up to the likes of Montale and Bond No. 9.

    But, then again, it's pretty bad anyways.

    Overall rating: 0/10.


    ===


    Phew, that was quite a lot to chug through. But you made it, so congratulations Now, I understand that, given the amount of exceptional fragrances present in my samples bundle, it's hard to really pick a favorite among my favorites. In an ideal world, I would have all of the ones I liked - but that's not quite the reality. The reality is that I'm a 19-year old college student who needs to pay for too many other things, and so I have to narrow it down even more. Here is the rundown of it all:

    The Scent of Peace is a must-have; but in itself, I can't justify buying it. It smells like D&G Light Blue (femme) rebottled, and so why would you spend the extra money for the same juice with a different name? That's too bad, this could have been a one-of-a-kind gem in the fragrance world.

    Montale's Blue Amber represents something that everyone should have in their wardrobe. It may not necessarily stipulate the necessity of amber, or vanilla; but the imagery it portrays is something every basenoter should have experienced. It's that feeling of mutual love between both you and your fragrance, and your fragrance and your skin. It doesn't have to make sense, and it doesn't have to be right for others - it just has to work for you. The boundaries of what a fragrance can be, suddenly break, and you're left wondering why there aren't more of these types of scents in the world.

    Well, that wasn't too hard. I guess since they were my two favorite, I had to elaborate on the concept of what they mean to us, as fragrance enthusiasts. Of course there's others, like the layering of Chocolate Greedy, which is so fun-filled I can't help but smile, and Red Vetyver for an amazing treat (to me, it smells like spiced hot chocolate). Bleecker Street is yet another; which engulfs you in it's sense of gentlemen-like masculinity. But for whichever other ones I liked, those are my absolute favorites.

    However, I believe that since every person's skin and body chemistry is different, and will therefore react differently to fragrances, then we should strive for mutualism in understanding what fragrances are capable of providing us with. Every bottle is something new, something different -- we may like them and we may hate them, but for the ones we grow to love, the experience of wearing it is beyond just our sense of smell. It should affect us, much in the same way our favorite songs, paintings, and poems do. It is the unparalleled appreciation we can find in such fine art that sets us, as a community, apart.

    And so my message to you is this: Whatever you do in life, find the sultry meaning behind it. The potency of such divine purity and incessant afflatus, the immeasurable significance it has on you - that spark, the Holy Grail, is found in the luminous grandeur that is perfection; coming from within the ability to embrace the world around you as you wish to see it.
    Last edited by Leifer; 22nd September 2008 at 09:20 PM.

  2. #2
    Basenotes Institution
    mikeperez23's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Posts
    27,201

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    As always, great reviews Leifer.

    Wow, Roadster is that bad, huh?
    "You are here to enable the Divine purpose of the Universe to unfold. That is how important you are."

    -- Eckhart Tolle

  3. #3

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    WHOA!! tht was some chugging buddy! thnx for the reviews, they were all inspiring!

  4. #4

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    A very good read Leifer.... thank you! I agree with several of your insights and disagree with several as well... just another illustration of how different tastes and perceptions can be!

    Nonetheless, these reviews will be very valuable to many BNers! Thanks for taking the time to share.

  5. #5

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    I hate to sound like a jerk but you gave the scent of peace an amazing rating but only to say that it smells like "light blue"? doesn't that ruin the scent for you?

  6. #6

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Interesting reading, Leifer. Thanks! I love the sound of Bleeker Street. Question for those who have tried it: Do you think it could work on a woman?

  7. #7

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Superb reviews as always my friend, I applaud your enthusiasm!


    PVC and Leather. A Chain and a feather




  8. #8

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by Blowe46 View Post
    I hate to sound like a jerk but you gave the scent of peace an amazing rating but only to say that it smells like "light blue"? doesn't that ruin the scent for you?
    The scent in terms of what I wanted it to be was ruined. Even though it's a blatant ripoff of one of the most popular women's fragrances, I still think it's a great formula... even if it is incredibly mainstream

  9. #9

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    I only know a couple of Montale perfumes in this set of reviews. Enough to say you really have seem to perceive them the way I do. I never did buy Fougeres Marines and I regretted it in a way. The pro's and cons of your review perfectly describe why I found it hard to make that decision. Three stars, that were almost four...
    The Scent of Peace
    by Bond No. 9: You make me feel that I must try that one soon, and I will !
    Last edited by narcus; 22nd September 2008 at 09:01 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  10. #10

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by Leifer View Post

    Roadster by Cartier

    Yuck! Pasty glue mixed with exceptionally unpleasant vegetable compost that has been oversprayed with Le Male. Roadster doesn't have much to it, it's monotonous and dead. A blend of chemicals mixed with the purpose of pushing brand-name colognes in a market full of consumers hungry for designer labels. A bad time to review a bad fragrance, because let's be honest for a moment: There's no way in hell this can stack up to the likes of Montale and Bond No. 9.

    But, then again, it's pretty bad anyways.

    Overall rating: 0/10.
    Im quite surprised. I wouldnt call this a review, rather a rage attack!
    By the way, I like Roadster immensely. Its sublime, IMHO.

  11. #11

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    interesting perspectives, Leifer... MY question is, what about these reviews is "mini"? hahaha There is a gigantic Montale thread on the women's boards. I'm sure your thoughts would be welcome there as well I'd be curious to know your thoughts on Greyland, Vetyver des Sables, Sandalsliver, Aoud Velvet (the first worked for me, the other three, not so much)...
    Last edited by nthny; 22nd September 2008 at 03:57 PM.

  12. #12

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by sables View Post
    Im quite surprised. I wouldnt call this a review, rather a rage attack!
    By the way, I like Roadster immensely. Its sublime, IMHO.
    I'll have to revisit it and re-review it. I know a lot of people like this scent, and it's definitely not cheap, so maybe there is some good in there. But you have to understand, with the sea of samples I was swimming in, Roadster was the last of my concerns



    Quote Originally Posted by nthny View Post
    interesting perspectives, Leifer... MY question is, what about these reviews is "mini"? hahaha There is a gigantic Montale thread on the women's boards. I'm sure your thoughts would be welcome there as well I'd be curious to know your thoughts on Greyland, Vetyver des Sables, Sandalsliver, Aoud Velvet (the first worked for me, the other three, not so much)...

    Oh these are mini-reviews, I really tried to limit myself to brief passages and very short descriptions. I write a lot, so when I sat down to present my information to the community, I tried not to make them essays... even though I really wanted to hit each and every single point with more elaboration.

    I haven't tried any of the ones you named, do you have any samples? If so I can review them, I'm always on the prowl for more fragrance samples

  13. #13

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Great stuff Leifer. I just reviewd many of these recently and I agree with many of the things you said. Great work.!
    "As you walk down the fairway of life you must smell the roses, for you only get to play one round."
    --Ben Hogan

  14. #14

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunani View Post
    Interesting reading, Leifer. Thanks! I love the sound of Bleeker Street. Question for those who have tried it: Do you think it could work on a woman?
    Maybe, depending on your skin chemistry. You certainly don't want it to bring out the woods, but the florals would work perfectly on a female.

  15. #15

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    If you like Blue Amber, you owe ti to yourself to try MPG's Ambre Precieux.

    It's not quite as thick and sweet as BA, but it's got the same construction in a more masculine package. I kept both.
    top ten: L'Air du Desert Marocain, Black Aoud, Le Labo Rose 31, Bois du Portugal, Incense Rose, Millesime Imperial, Czech & Speake no.88, Terre de Hermes, Musc Ravageur, Nasomatto Duro

    Best layers: GIT and TdH, GIT and BA

    sample wishlist: Roses Musk

  16. #16

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by thaifighter View Post
    If you like Blue Amber, you owe ti to yourself to try MPG's Ambre Precieux.

    It's not quite as thick and sweet as BA, but it's got the same construction in a more masculine package. I kept both.
    I'll definitely have to give it a shot. Blue Amber is a fantastic scent, even though woods usually don't work for me at all. I was stunned when I smelled it on my skin; it's delicate yet powerful, but not overpowering.

    I revisited Roadster, and I still get the same reaction. Guess my cruel statement about it remains intact.

  17. #17

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Quote Originally Posted by Leifer View Post

    *: Now that we're on the subject of music, if you guys really want to hear death metal written by Mozart, check this out
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hfslLWySZYg
    Wrong, that's death metal composed by Mikael Akerfeldt. You're speaking my real language now. Back in the day I covered "When" with Afflitus. Have you heard Protest the Hero, Between the Buried and Me, Alarum, Spiral Architect, Extol, and Cynic? There aren't too many prog death bands and I figure if you like Opeth you'll like them. They're all pretty unique in their own way. Watch it though, old Protest the hero sounds punk.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ypCdGNe3Bvs

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=19UZd_DKs2Q


    Anyway, I just had some major shoulder surgery (typing one handed) but I soon plan on starting my latest music project. All basenoters get it free for sure, but I'm not sure if I'll try to sell it to others yet, we'll see. And no, it won't be all metal

    Oh, and the second reason for me posting here is that I'll eventually like to sample all of you're favorites and this post will make the thread easier to find.

  18. #18
    vita odorifera
    perfaddict's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Lagos
    Posts
    7,586
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Nice reviews, Leifer.

    Couldn't Roadster (which i do not like) get at least a 1 for existing at all ?
    ointments and perfume delight the heart....

    #BBOG!

  19. #19

    Default Re: mega-compilation of mini-reviews [part 2!]

    Great reviews. A great read.

    Just one thing, looks like your Silver Factory was too old or not good

    Nah just kidding , funny to see how someone can hate a fragrance you love (and that is not offensive at all imo ! )
    Current top 10 in no particular order : Malle - Carnal Flower (pre 2008) ; Montale - Black Aoud ; Bond #9 - Silver Factory ; Tauer - L'air du dsert marocain ; C&Z - No 88 ; Francis K. - APOM ; Creed - Aventus ; Amouage - Epic ; Profumum - Dulcis In Fundo ; Amouage - Opus V

Similar Threads

  1. Montale Oudh/non Oudh - micro mini views from 16 samples - complete..
    By jenson in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 24th June 2014, 03:26 PM
  2. Ava Luxe Incense frags - mini reviews
    By Schachman in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 16th June 2008, 03:38 AM
  3. My Samples Arrived: Mini Reviews
    By Scentologist in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 4th April 2008, 11:33 PM
  4. Hermessence - mini reviews
    By leopoldo in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 4th November 2006, 02:36 PM
  5. I'm Back!!! plus YSL mini reviews
    By ironmics in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 17th June 2005, 09:13 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  



Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000