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  1. #1

    Default Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    I'm not an everyday smoker but when I go out for a drink I sometimes have a cigarette or three. Well the other night I was at a party and after a few cigarettes and more than a few glasses of wine I suddenly became aware that the Samsara EDP I'd applied before leaving home (a spray on my neck and one on each wrist) had taken on a VERY loud, musty and overbearing tone that was quite unpleasant even to myself. I've never had this experience with Samsara on other occasions so I put it down to there being some reaction to either the alcohol in my chemistry or the smoke in the air, or both. I'm wondering if others have had a similar experience with fragrance ?
    Last edited by Artemisia; 15th October 2008 at 12:47 PM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    It seems reasonable to assume that alcohol and cigarettes can affect your body chemistry (like hormones and diet do) enough to change the way you perceive your fragrance. I believe these body chemistry changes affect the way your fragrance actually smells because of the way the fragrance interacts with the changes in your skin. Our skin is a vital organ that always reflects what's happening to us internally. But many people believe it's all in the perception, and I can't challenge that. So whether it's your perception of the fragrance changing due to alcohol and cigarettes (and the smell of others' alcohol and cigarettes in the environment), or whether the perfume actually does interact differently and smell different, I can't say with any certainty. I remember people telling me that jamsine, which Samsara has a pretty high concentration of, is particularly affected by diet, hormones, etc. Hope this makes sense. I think I need another cup of coffee this a.m.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    I wear Samsara regularly, and I have had the same thing happen to me. Not all the time, but every now and again, even with minimal application, i feel like the fragrance is screaming!! Its so loud sometimes.... but I still love it.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    I can always smell when someone's been drinking. And that alcohol smell does mix witht he smoke and the perfume.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    There was a thread a few days ago on the men's side about how scents smell different on a smoker. It was a much heated topic, requiring DustB's moderation, but it did address some of the issues you mention. Here is the link, in case you're interested.

    I think Samsara has some chameleon-like qualities depending upon how much you apply. It can be overbearing without adding smoke or alcohol to the equation! I think Lilybelle's remarks are spot on about the variance between the wearer's perception vs. the observer's perception of the scent. It's a curious issue about body chemistry. I'm not sure honestly how much of a difference the scent really changes on a person due to chemistry, smoking, alcohol use, or if it is the wearer's perception of those "changes". Interesting topic.

    :wave:

  6. #6

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    I hope you'll continue this discussion. We didn't say much about the interaction between perfume and tobacco smoke before the conversation got personal. And alcohol didn't come up, either. I'd love to read anyone's response to Luca Turin's piece on Jasmin et Cigarette in the August NZZ Folio. One thing he supposes is that certain older perfumes were constructed, consciously or not, with the presence of cigarette smoke in mind.
    Port and cigars, coffee and cigarettes, perfume and food. Why not Scotch and Vintage Tabarome? Sierra Nevada IPA and Guerlain Vetiver? Clove cigarettes and A la Nuit?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    I think the question of perception vs objective 'scent' is something that can't be answered until someone commissions and carries out an extensive, expensive double blind study, possibly involving actual machines that can perceive scent differences at the atomic level (atom level? not a scientist...!). So I have to assume that my own opinion on this, and those of others, are subjective until proven otherwise.

    I don't mind the smell of cigarette smoke (it can get to be too much in a small enclosed environment, but so can any scent) and I actually *like* my boyfriend smelling and tasting of smoke most of the time so I'm inclined to find the mix of perfume and smoke interesting rather than offensive. I haven't noticed specific frags smelling different on smokers than non-smokers, but it's not really something I've ever tried to do, either. Now I want to go spray my smoking friends and follow them around sniffing for a day.
    "It's now very common to hear people say "I'm rather offended by that." As if that gives them certain rights. It's actually nothing more than a whine. 'I find that offensive.' It has no meaning; it has no purpose; it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. 'I am offended by that.' Well so fucking what." - Stephen Fry

  8. #8

    Default Re: Cigarettes, Alcohol and Perfume

    Quote Originally Posted by Strollyourlobster View Post
    I hope you'll continue this discussion. We didn't say much about the interaction between perfume and tobacco smoke before the conversation got personal. And alcohol didn't come up, either. I'd love to read anyone's response to Luca Turin's piece on Jasmin et Cigarette in the August NZZ Folio. One thing he supposes is that certain older perfumes were constructed, consciously or not, with the presence of cigarette smoke in mind.
    Port and cigars, coffee and cigarettes, perfume and food. Why not Scotch and Vintage Tabarome? Sierra Nevada IPA and Guerlain Vetiver? Clove cigarettes and A la Nuit?
    Much as I enjoyed reading that, I must say I don't miss smoky places since I quit smoking years ago. But I know exactly what he means about the ambient sterility of a restaurant/bar without smoke. Great observation, imo, that those older fragrances were composed with cigarette smoke in mind. They must have been. And it often involved oak moss, the dusty hazy filter in my old bottle of Miss Dior that I found on ebay. But I can't start feeling nostalgic about cigarette smoke now - it was too damned hard to give it up!

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