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  1. #1

    Default Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    Many a time we find ourself sniffing more than half a dozen scents in a scent shop..and only wished we have 6 pair of hands like Natraj(would that be nice?). but, in the process, we dont get to test the most of the frgrances on skin and depend on Testing strips. now, how accurate is it...? i do understand skin chemistry plays a big factor, but then i often see images of perfumers testing various essential oils in paper strips...well?

    So, the two questions that i have is this, 1) how accurate is it 2) what is the life cycle of one spray on a strip (top-base notes)

  2. #2

    Default Re: Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    I find that the test strips greatly prolong the topnotes. I think it is more accurate testing the fragrance on your skin.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    I don't know about how accurate it is in a scientific way, but the testing strips are paper so they are neutral. That is my guess and the reason you find them at stores and used by perfumers. I'm sure you all would agree that paper even has it's own smell, but if there was a waxy substance to neutralize even that, then you could get a very accurate reading on scents.

    I have noticed that after 3 hours the scent really wears. Up until then the scent is still pretty good in the basenotes. The top notes usually last longer on paper as well. Woohoo! I just copied ChrisW! It's true though.
    Last edited by EnvYuS; 3rd November 2008 at 06:57 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    I left a test paper strip of Polo Modern Reserve in my car for a week, varying temps of hot and cold and it still smelled good.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    Quote Originally Posted by SirSlarty View Post
    I left a test paper strip of Polo Modern Reserve in my car for a week, varying temps of hot and cold and it still smelled good.
    I've had many like this..Safari did that once. Some smell good for a day or days later but it is a light smell.

    Jenson, I have a new method for places like Sephora, Ulta or Macys where it is wide open testing. Sometimes when I'm at Ulta I even grab extra strips for later. But I get a pen and just label the cards and spray a bunch..I like the large, rectangle ones at Ulta compared to Sephora. Anyways, I take an intitial blast sniff and then lay it down by the bottle so I don't get fatigued or comingle cards in my hands. then after a bit I go back and smell each one and try and figure which ones I want to leave and take. Then I spread the ones I'm taking out and put them in the front seat of my car until I get home or to the office where I can resmell. I found early on when I collected strips they just comingled too much. Creeds especially since many have the similar drydown.
    "As you walk down the fairway of life you must smell the roses, for you only get to play one round."
    --Ben Hogan

  6. #6

    Default Re: Testing Strips - the life span of one spritz on a strip ?

    Jenson, in answer to question number 1, I would have to say that using tester strips tends to retain (as ChrisW has mentioned above) mainly top/middle notes better.

    But here's something interesting: as a part of my fragrance training, we were told that because paper is not odourless, then the paper itself can change the way the scent smells. Many paper stocks are bleached for whiteness, and thus chemically speaking, can effect the scent, as can heavily printed papers. We were taught never, never, NEVER to sample on printed blotters, as inks also smell, PARTICULARLY when diluted with alcohol.
    As a general rule, I would never rely on the scent sprayed on a paper blotter such as the illustrative Armani Code ones, or pitch-black Juliette Has a Gun ones, or the baby pink Agent provocateur ones, etc. Be mindful of this when an SA sprays a coloured card and hands it to you.

    Bottom line: your skin is ALWAYS going to be the best canvas upon which you can apply a smell.
    Last edited by Sorcery of Scent; 3rd November 2008 at 08:00 PM.

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