Code of Conduct
Results 1 to 11 of 11
  1. #1

    Question "Rectified" oils

    Some expensive oils have less expensive "rectified" versions available. For example, melissa and verbena.

    My understanding, and I may have this wrong, is the non rectified oils use the highest quality and grade of plant leaves in the steam distillation process.

    The rectified oils use lower "common" quality plant leaves and parts in the distillation process. After distillation, the end product is "rectified" or put through a purification process to remove unwanted components. It's cheaper because it is less labor intensive.

    Do I have that right?

    Does anyone have any experience with "rectified" and non-rectified versions of any oils? I'd be interested in hearing of any perceived differences in scent, solubility, combining, etc.
    Last edited by Neurotic Scientist; 9th December 2008 at 01:21 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    The term "rectified" is used but rarely. As applied to essential oils etc. it has no precise meaning and each usage can mean different things. In general "rectified" means that an additional processing step has been performed to remove some unwanted component. I would have to search to find an actual use of this term with essential oils, I believe that I may have seen it applied to bergamot oil that had been treated to remove bergaptene though the more usual designation for this seems to be "Bergamot Oil, FCF". I am guessing that you might also see it applied to essential oils that had been processed to remove terpenes though again the more usual terminology is to say "terpene free".

    My understanding, and I may have this wrong, is the non rectified oils use the highest quality and grade of plant leaves in the steam distillation process.

    The rectified oils use lower "common" quality plant leaves and parts in the distillation process. After distillation, the end product is "rectified" or put through a purification process to remove unwanted components. It's cheaper because it is less labor intensive.

    Do I have that right?
    Your interpretation, stated above, is unknown to me.

    Do you have any links to websites where you are seeing these "rectified" oils?

    My usual sources for essential oils or absolutes are Eden Botanical, White Lotus Aromatics, Liberty Natural, John D. Walsh ...

    Edit:
    Here is the "rectified" products page from a large British supplier of essential oils:
    http://www.treatt.com/ProductsItems....ils&Country=UK

    You can see the many various different terms used. For examples, there is:

    "Bay Oil Rectified" and "Bay Oil Terpeneless". I would guess that they both have been treated by fractional distillation to remove terpenes but that the "Bay Oil Rectifed" has a significantly greater amount of residual terpenes than the "Bay Oil Terpeneless".

    For certain citrus oils an additional term is "Fold", a Folded oil has been treated to remove terpenes with the degree of Fold indicating the degree of concentration of desirable (non terpene) materials. For example there is Lemon Oil 2, 4, 5 and 8 Fold also Lemon Oil Terpeneless and Lemon Oil Sesquiterpeneless.

    This company also has a Bergamot Oil Terpeneless but it is not stated that this is also Furocoumarin Free (FCF) so this oil may still be photosensitizing. Similarly it is possible to produce Bergamot Oil FCF by saponification which would not reduce the terpene content.

    Edit2:
    Here is a Google book search that has an entry about rectified peppermint oil:
    http://books.google.com/books?id=HWD...um=4&ct=result
    Last edited by dcampen; 8th December 2008 at 05:13 PM.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  3. #3

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    dcampen,

    I just want to say a heartfelt thanks for your superb posts that are always thoroughly informed, concise, precise, and exhaustive. I always learn from them, and I appreciate such posts immensely.

    Best regards,

    scentemental

  4. #4

    Question Re: "Rectified" oils

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    dcampen,

    I just want to say a heartfelt thanks for your superb posts that are always thoroughly informed, concise, precise, and exhaustive. I always learn from them, and I appreciate such posts immensely.
    But he didn't answer my question. He even said himself:
    Quote Originally Posted by dcampen View Post
    Your interpretation, stated above, is unknown to me.

    Do you have any links to websites where you are seeing these "rectified" oils?

    I will repeat my question:
    Quote Originally Posted by Neurotic Scientist View Post
    Does anyone have any experience with "rectified" and non-rectified versions of any oils? I'd be interested in hearing of any perceived differences in scent, solubility, combining, etc.
    Now, as requested, here are some links describing what I was talking about:

    Melissa (Melissa officinalis):

    USA, $254.00 per ounce: http://www.edenbotanicals.com/essentials6.html#melissa
    Southeast Europe, SCO2, $260.00 per ounce: http://www.edenbotanicals.com/essentials6.html#melissa
    USA, $137.25 per ounce: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/248.htm
    UK, $120.49 per ounce: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/131.htm
    France, Rectified, $9.36 per ounce: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/261.htm
    France, Rectified, $11.36 per ounce: http://www.essential7.com/essentialoils/melissa.html
    Spain, $8.99 per ounce (I believe it is the "rectified" type): http://cgi.ebay.com/1-oz-MELISSA-LEM...713.m153.l1262



    Verbena (Lippia citriodora):

    France, $420.00 per ounce: http://www.victorie-inc.us/verbena_lemon.html
    France, $63.57 per ounce: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/587.htm
    France, Rectified, $20.86 per ounce: http://libertynatural.com/bulk/207.htm


    The word "rectified" usually means "purified" in chemistry and liquor production. Hence my interpretation that since the "rectified" versions are cheaper, they are distilling larger amounts of unsorted plant material, then purifying it.

    However, since verbena and melissa are both "lemony" smelling oils, I suspect that "rectified" may mean (in the case of these two specific oils) that they're blended with other cheaper "lemony" oils, like lemon, lemongrass, or synthetics. However, that's hardly "rectifying" the original oils, that's adulterating them!

  5. #5

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    Usage of the word rectification in this text suggests that it means removing certain undesirable elements, not adding or cutting with cheaper components:

    http://books.google.com/books?id=rGQ...sult#PPA276,M1

  6. #6

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    This site says, "This melissa essential oil has been rectified, and is still very much a favorite oil for perfumes, soaps and candles. This oil is not as therapeutic as the Bulgarian version but it is still valuable in aromatherapy. Click this link if you are looking for a higher grade of Melissa Oil."

    Again, that's why it seems to me this must be "lower grade" meaning it comes from a larger pool of unsorted plant material, then purified to remove undesireable elements. Since the yield is larger and the process less labor intensive, it's much cheaper.

    However, this site says differently: "Melissa (Rectified) - May contain other lemon oils and/or citronella", and goes on to suggest that only the "rectified" should be used for blending.

    It seems even merchants are confused as to what "rectified" designates exactly.

  7. #7

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    It seems even merchants are confused as to what "rectified" designates exactly.
    Hmm, I answered that question and then you complained that that wasn't your question. Oh well.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  8. #8

    Question Re: "Rectified" oils

    Quote Originally Posted by dcampen View Post
    Hmm, I answered that question and then you complained that that wasn't your question. Oh well.
    No, I didn't complain. I simply stated a fact. I was looking to hear from people who have actually used both the cheaper "rectified" and the more expensive version of the same oils. Again,
    Quote Originally Posted by Neurotic Scientist View Post
    Does anyone have any experience with "rectified" and non-rectified versions of any oils? I'd be interested in hearing of any perceived differences in scent, solubility, combining, etc.
    Also, "It seems even merchants are confused as to what 'rectified' designates exactly" isn't a question, it's a statement. I re-read your post, and I don't see how anything you posted explains the conflicting information between sites in regards to the example that I gave of melissa oil. Did you click the links?-

    Quote Originally Posted by Neurotic Scientist View Post
    This site says, "This melissa essential oil has been rectified, and is still very much a favorite oil for perfumes, soaps and candles. This oil is not as therapeutic as the Bulgarian version but it is still valuable in aromatherapy. Click this link if you are looking for a higher grade of Melissa Oil."

    ...

    However, this site says differently: "Melissa (Rectified) - May contain other lemon oils and/or citronella", and goes on to suggest that only the "rectified" should be used for blending.

  9. #9

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    I'd call liberty natural and ask them what, specifically, is the difference. That's a huge price gap and I have a feeling the difference is more than using unsorted plant material.
    ***For sale:

    Iris Pallida 50ml

    Ungaro I 75ml

    and more!
    - http://www.basenotes.net/threads/301...n-Man-and-more

  10. #10

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    Yes, the "Rectified" Lemon Verbena and Melissa EOs from Liberty Natural would seem to be adulterated. You can see this on the C of A sheet where it says "Quality:MODIFIED". So seemingly yet another use of the term "rectified".

    Edit:
    And given the huge disparity in prices I might even guess that the "rectified" Melissa and Lemon Verbena EOs from Liberty Natural are "reconstituted" from fragrance chemicals which may or may not be from natural sources. It would be interesting to hear what Liberty Natural says.
    Last edited by dcampen; 10th December 2008 at 06:07 PM.
    All these moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain.

  11. #11

    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: "Rectified" oils

    Rectification:

    Any oil containing impurities may be purified by redistillation by vacuum or steam. Part of the oil is removed in the process.

    Rectification does not necessarily mean the plant material is a lower grade. Sometimes it is necessary to make the oil safe to work with.

    Modifications, fabrications, or imitations are blends of essential oils or synthetic oils created to mimic expensive oils.

    Lemon Verbena and Melissa are frequently adulterated with lemon, lemongrass, and citronella oils. These could have a impact on a perfume blends because of their photoxic and skin sensiting components.

    Deterpenized oils: Terpenes are partly or totally reomoved becuase of their insolubility in alcohol which creates cloudiness in perfumes etc.

    Aromatherapy For Health Professionals: Shirley and Len Price
    The Complete Guide to Aromatherapy - Salvatore Battaglia

Similar Threads

  1. Primer on How to Make Perfume (Version 1.0)
    By ItalianStallion in forum Fragrance DIY
    Replies: 125
    Last Post: 25th January 2014, 01:46 PM
  2. Perfume Oils - My verdict - and yours please
    By supercat84 in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 13th May 2007, 06:57 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14th February 2007, 07:13 PM
  4. *Neroli EDP*, Masculine or Feminine?: A Review
    By scentemental in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 19th August 2005, 03:42 PM
  5. ESSENTIAL OILS from EMS.  Gonna make my own s
    By SixCats in forum Male Fragrance Discussion
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 9th July 2005, 02:00 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •