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  1. #1
    ltaraleigh's Avatar
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    Default Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    There seems to be a theme amongst serious perfumista's (can't think of a better word) that aquatic scents are just...yuck. Why is this? Not enough depth? Too clean?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I find them sickly. I can't describe it in any better terms than that (never been particularly good at describing what is, for me, a physical reaction). I just hate them. There's something in there - wish I knew what it was - that provokes a strong response that says 'run away!'...I have a similar reaction to Angel and that's not aquatic. Some perfumes just do that to me, no idea why and I don't care to find out, particularly.
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  3. #3
    Sugandaraja's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    My nose tires of them easily, and I find they clash with many notes I do like.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Yes, I hate aquatic scents. There are so many good fragrances to choose from that aquatic scents are just not even on my list.
    Last edited by Mimi Gardenia; 27th December 2008 at 10:53 AM.
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  5. #5

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Because they are easy to dismiss, and their differences are typically more subtle than in the spicy scents. This is because to remain aquatic certain limitations are in order.. if you use too much spice or too much woods or what have you, it's no longer aquatic.

    I also think it's a reaction to them being the most popular category amongst the 'normal folk'. Subconsciously many self-proclaimed perfumistas feel that their tastes are inherently better than the masses and hence they avoid the 'dreck' that the masses like, without ever giving the lot of them a fair and unbiased analysis.
    Last edited by SculptureOfSoul; 27th December 2008 at 11:06 AM.
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    My problem with them is the overpowering melon or cucumber notes I get from them. I'm not at all fond of melon and cuke makes me feel....well...salad-y rather than fresh green.

    I much prefer a nice oceanic scent - after much searching I have found several that are very true in composition (at least to my frame of reference) & can be layered with other scents.
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  7. #7
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    If I ever found an "aquatic" scent that actually smelled of ocean and not of the same tired old synthetics, I might actually like it.
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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    DSH La Plage Seaspray (which I like layering with roses) and Creed Erolfa both smell oceanic, those are nice. The fake notes in some of the so-called aquatics might be a turn off, I don't know, I usually like light and simple scents so that's not the problem.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    They often make me sneeze. I'[ve never smelled an acquatic that didn't make me sneeze and I find the line rather dull and not something I want to smell off. I don't like most incense perfumes either, too heavy and smokey,
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I think many perfumistas and basenoters have sensitive senses of smell and therefore react negatively to the synthetic feel of the so called oceanic notes. Once you get turned on to the liveliness and vibrancy of naturals and compositions that include them, the straight lines of some synthetics no longer are appealling, it's like polyester to silk. Some synthetics are worse than others in this respect.

    I also get a physical reaction to many oceanics, just like I do from many synthetic sweet scents. My system feels poisoned by the smell and reacts with strong nausea. I's not snobbery, it's biology. And as such will differ greatly between individuals.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by iez View Post
    I think many perfumistas and basenoters have sensitive senses of smell and therefore react negatively to the synthetic feel of the so called oceanic notes. Once you get turned on to the liveliness and vibrancy of naturals and compositions that include them, the straight lines of some synthetics no longer are appealling, it's like polyester to silk. Some synthetics are worse than others in this respect.

    I also get a physical reaction to many oceanics, just like I do from many synthetic sweet scents. My system feels poisoned by the smell and reacts with strong nausea. I's not snobbery, it's biology. And as such will differ greatly between individuals.

    But then explain how scents like Terre d'Hermes, which is 50% Iso e super, are proclaimed to be modern masterpieces here?

    It's more than just biology - or else this collection of basenoters is a huge anomaly in the biological sense in comparison to the masses.
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  12. #12

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    If I ever found an "aquatic" scent that actually smelled of ocean and not of the same tired old synthetics, I might actually like it.
    Calone is one of the strongest aromachemicals I have smelled.
    We did a Note Identification Project last summer, and swapped packages of the samples we bought, and I got an opportunityh to smell Calone, straight, for the first time. I could smell it right through the sample vial, without even opening the lid. Just the tiny bit leftover from the last time it was open smelled that intense.

    You made a good point about people liking Iso E Super, though. Perhaps it is because this is a softer note.
    It is probably Calone's strength and unique aroma that makes it intolerable to many Basenoters.
    I didn't like tuberose absolute for the same reason--strong, rubbery--and it is all natural.

    On the other hand, (I will now disprove my own theory) I love galbanum, and that one can be smelled through the vial also. What a permeating scent! Ditto: patchouli.
    I guess it's true: "One man's ceiling is another man's floor."

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    It's more than just biology - or else this collection of basenoters is a huge anomaly in the biological sense in comparison to the masses.
    Wait. I kind of like being an anomaly.
    Heh.
    Last edited by purplebird7; 27th December 2008 at 02:06 PM.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    But then explain how scents like Terre d'Hermes, which is 50% Iso e super, are proclaimed to be modern masterpieces here?

    It's more than just biology - or else this collection of basenoters is a huge anomaly in the biological sense in comparison to the masses.

    Like I wrote the synthetics are very different as well as the sensitivity of the person.
    I absolutely love Iso E super as long as it is mixed with some naturals to give it a little life. Even on it's own I never find it offensive or nauseating.
    I only speak for myself, and to me it is a pure physical reaction I get from some synthetics, before having any time to analysing or making a concious judgement. That's what I call biology. I smell something I'm expecting to like and then I have to get away from it fast or throw up on the spot.

    It may be more or less common, but I find it hard to believe I'm the only one with this sensitivity. A person with it would be drawn to a forum like this in order to find scents that don't offend their noses, so if the percentage of olfactory freaks is very high here it would not be surprising at all.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I don't hate aquatics. I prefer oriental scents because they smell better on me. The notes that work best for me are difficult to find in aquatic scents. By analyzing some of my favorite fragrances, common notes include cumin, cardamom, cistus [ladanifer?], gaiac wood, labdanum, patchouli, rose, amber, sandalwood, oud/agarwood, galbanbum, styrax, benzoin and cedar.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    In my unscientific opinion, I think it is often a matter of taste and aesthetics: some just can't stand certain notes (as listed above), others find the aquatics uninteresting and unoriginal yet ubiquitous, and still others find it ironic at best there isn't much that's aquatic about most aquatics.

    I don't hate them myself, and in very hot weather there are a few I like.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    To my senses, many aquatics are simultaneously sharp and flat. For instance, Escada Into the Blue pierces my brain with a screechy note, and then just sits on it's laurels while the other notes lie lifelessly on my skin.

    I can think of only one fragrance with ''aquatic" notes that I like, and thats Hermes Eau des Merveilles. The orange notes breathe life into this one.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I smelled Calone while at Le Labo, and it nearly made me vomit. I am pretty sure this is why aquatic scents are offputting to me. I like watery fruit smells, though--melon, peach, pear, etc. Calone is the real culprit, for me.

  18. #18

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    For me, aquatics feel like sandpaper inside my nostrils.
    I associate them not with the ocean, but with something sleek, modern, glassy, cold.
    I prefer brocade and velvet, art nouveau, and the wonderful orientals, ambers, and leathers that I associate with them.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Sickly--Clemmie
    Sandpaper inside my nostrils--Therese
    Sharp and flat--Pomander
    Nearly made me vomit--Asha

    Each of you articulated my own thoughts so well that there is no need for me to add my two cents' worth.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Most of these very same perfumistas are huge fans of classic, aldehydic, overly floral, grand-style french perfumes, many of which are simply overwhelmingly suffocating to me. Its all a matter of expertly crafting a fragrance with core ingredients, whether it be calone or a crass aldehyde interjected in the latest grand oriental/floral. There are many examples of well composed "aquatics" with either an aquatic note presented upfront (Kenzo pour homme, Bulgari Aqua, Aqua di Sale, etc.) or latent in a composition giving it depth (Silver Mountain Water). If you are allergic to anything aquatic itself, well then maybe the category isnt for you. Back to aldehydic florals you go.
    Last edited by zztopp; 27th December 2008 at 09:49 PM.
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  21. #21

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Backlash? Cool Water and Aqua di Gio (at least the men's) were (are?) just everywhere. I still don't find Cool Water dreadful, femme nor homme. In fact if someone were wearing it, I'd probably think he/she smelled nice. Honestly, I think it has to do with it's place in the mainstream. Most "serious perfumistas" avoid what is common or inclusive.
    AND, it may come down to misclassification. These days the categories have become confused. Many scents are being labeled 'chypres' that smell nothing like they belong in that category. This has much to do with new technologies and trends, but also I believe pure snobbery. Sometimes I read the boards (several) and people are going on about the sophistication and intellectual qualities of this or that chypre...and it's not chypre. Not saying that one can't perceive certain qualities in whatever scent- just saying that group-think, trends, and snobbery tend to creep in amongst connoisseurs. Just like the chypre tends to be exalted, aquatic tend to be slammed. I doubt that if more people wore chypres, that they would continue to be revered. I doubt that if more people started to wear vintage classics, they would be as respected.
    I digress... What I mean, regarding misclassification, is that many scents do have big aquatic accords, and they aren't trashed. It may be that it is well done, OR it may be that the "serious perfumistas" don't know it's there (these would be the people who really dislike the association, rather than the actual scent quality, which imo covers most detractors)-Fleur de Liane is an example. Notes are notes, and accords are accords. A well composed aquatic doesn't make it other than it is. A well done fruity-floral doesn't make it other than a fruity-floral. A horrendously executed floral, doesn't reclassify it as an aquatic, etc.

    I don't have any obvious aquatics in my stash, but I tend to stick to a couple genres. Basically my collection is made up of (overwhelmingly) green-florals, a few chypres, and a couple orientals and fruity florals.
    Last edited by leffleur; 27th December 2008 at 10:02 PM.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I've tried scents with aquatic notes on myself and after about 10 seconds I start to feel really seasick. I don't even get seasick. A part of me wants to like them but just can't do it. It's just too synthetically overwhelming, like I'm wearing a glade plug in air freshener, which I don't mind but wouldn't want to wear ever.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    My preference is for earthy/grounded scents and my favourite basenotes are patchouli, amber, musk and sometimes vanilla. To me aquatic scents always seem to be baseless - after the initial blast of notes they fade away to nothing. For someone whose favourite part of wearing perfume is the drydown the aquatic scents that I have tried have been a complete waste of time, and I used to wear CK Escape! Beachy scents like Satellite Ipanema and Ava Luxe Venus Sands are the closest I'll get to wearing aquatics! I do agree with Clemmie in that aquatic perfumes can make me feel sickly too.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumistas turned off by aquatic scents?

    I gather that there are quite a few poorly-done aquatic type scents out there right now, unfortunately. So the widespread disdain for the category is probably mostly a matter of good taste among the folks who frequent Basenotes.

    There is, of course, huge variation in individual taste. For example, there are plenty of perfumistas who like very sweet fruity florals and/or strongly aldehydic florals. I don't. But that doesn't mean they don't have good taste and that I do. We're just different!

    I happen to like a few fragrances that contain a watery/aquatic accord. In fact, I love these four:

    Frederic Malle EN PASSANT
    Jo Malone LOTUS BLOSSOM & WATER LILY
    Stéphanie de Saint-Aignan LI ALTARELLI
    Hermes UN JARDIN APRES LA MOUSSON

    And I'm pretty sure that I will like the one that Leffleur mentions, L'Artisan's FLEUR DE LIANE. It's on my list of things to sample. I'm also looking forward to trying some of the salty oceanic types of aquatics, and I'm certain that I'll love some of them.
    Last edited by Haunani; 27th December 2008 at 10:36 PM.

  25. #25
    Sugandaraja's Avatar
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    I also think it's a reaction to them being the most popular category amongst the 'normal folk'. Subconsciously many self-proclaimed perfumistas feel that their tastes are inherently better than the masses and hence they avoid the 'dreck' that the masses like, without ever giving the lot of them a fair and unbiased analysis.
    Quote Originally Posted by SculptureOfSoul View Post
    It's more than just biology - or else this collection of basenoters is a huge anomaly in the biological sense in comparison to the masses.


    This isn't about class warfare - this is about fragrance.

    I do not care about what or what not "the masses" wear. I can imagine someone not wanting to wear what everyone else at the office wears, but no-one I interact with regularly wears aquatics, or any fragrance at all, for that matter, and yet I still have a distaste for calone-heavy creations. Neither me nor my mother have ever liked aquatics, long before I even knew what calone was.

    There are some aquatics I appreciate, but don't wear regularly because of what I described earlier. I quite like Laura Tonatto's Oltre, but it lasts until you wash it off and at full volume, and I find even though it's interesting my nose just goes "Enough, enough, enough!" after twelve hours or so. Same with two aquatic green florals I appreciate, Michael Storer's Stephanie and Eau D'Italie's Magnolia Romana.

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunani View Post
    I happen to like a few fragrances that contain a watery/aquatic accord. In fact, I love these four:

    Frederic Malle EN PASSANT
    Interesting - I adore En Passant, but I'd never thought of it as an aquatic before. However, given the "cucumber" note and its dewy effect, I wouldn't at all be surprised by calone's presence.

    Perhaps calone and me are like me and pine. There's a slight touch of pine in L'Eau Trois which gives it a lovely lift and freshness to an otherwise herbal resinous accord, but a pine-heavy fragrance just makes me gag and think of floor cleaners.
    Last edited by Sugandaraja; 28th December 2008 at 02:17 AM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp View Post
    Most of these very same perfumistas are huge fans of classic, aldehydic, overly floral, grand-style french perfumes, many of which are simply overwhelmingly suffocating to me. Its all a matter of expertly crafting a fragrance with core ingredients, whether it be calone or a crass aldehyde interjected in the latest grand oriental/floral. There are many examples of well composed "aquatics" with either an aquatic note presented upfront (Kenzo pour homme, Bulgari Aqua, Aqua di Sale, etc.) or latent in a composition giving it depth (Silver Mountain Water). If you are allergic to anything aquatic itself, well then maybe the category isnt for you. Back to aldehydic florals you go.
    I am not really a lover of grand, aldehydic florals, although I do appreciate them. I think I must have a scent association with Calone, or perhaps an association a naturally occurring vegetal component which has Calone-like qualities. The first thing that comes to mind for me is that it could be my hard-wired negative association with celery--as a result, the scent makes me very ill. Celery and Calone seem to share a common quality for me. Vetiver also can develop a celery quality in the drydown.

    The latest development which I have talked about before is the ammonia smell I get from some men's fragrances. I have a growing list of things I am less apt to smell if they have any of these negative tendencies. I think this is normal, and it has nothing to do with classifying the type of perfume enthusiast I am. I am not an aquatic hater. I am a perfume lover. If a perfume makes me sick, then there is no reason to give it any skin time.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by Galamb_Borong View Post
    Interesting - I adore En Passant, but I'd never thought of it as an aquatic before. However, given the "cucumber" note and its dewy effect, I wouldn't at all be surprised by calone's presence.
    I don't know if it has Calone or not - I'm still learning about that. It does have, as you say, that "dewy" quality, and one of the "notes" listed is "rain accord". So I guess I'd call it aquatic. Isn't it an amazing fragrance?

    Note to those with more experience: What fragrances are heavy on the calone? I have tried one that I think might be. Montale's SANDFLOWERS lists "Ocean Notes" as being one of its components. That fragrance is a bit artificial-smelling to my nose. Any other experiences?

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunani View Post
    Note to those with more experience: What fragrances are heavy on the calone? I have tried one that I think might be. Montale's SANDFLOWERS lists "Ocean Notes" as being one of its components. That fragrance is a bit artificial-smelling to my nose. Any other experiences?
    I think the easiest way to find calone used bluntly is to look for cheap cleaning products that have names along the line of "sea fresh", "sea breeze" or anything that's supposed to smell like the ocean but doesn't. ( Not to say these are fair comparisons to the better aquatics! )

    Calone itself... kind of smells like rain and cucumbers, but not the real ocean to my nose. What I like about Laura Tonatto's Oltre - which is very calone heavy - is that it uses seaweed, which makes the whole "marine" effect much more realistic.

    Wikipedia has a list of calone-focused fragrances: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Calone

    I'm not sure how accurate that is, as I haven't any of them but Escape, and that was years and years ago.

    L'Écume des Jours by Ayala Moriel is an example of an all-natural i.e. no calone attempt at an aquatic fragrance. To me... it smells like a pond, though not in a bad way.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I like a few. But some can turn kind of manly.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I tend to like aquatics a lot - hey, I'm a child of the 90's - on a paper strip. Or on someone else. As a room spray. Actually, any situation short of having them on my skin. I always gravitate toward the more modern, simplified orientals; spices, amber, "warm" aroma's that melt into the skin as opposed to floating on top of it. That irritates me hugely for some reason.
    At some point, I have been part of the "ew, no aquatics" snob squad, but later on I started realising that's an oversimplification. I *do* like them, I just don't like what they do on my skin. Same with many green tea, air and white flower inoffensive office type scents, by the way. The Jardins and the Eau Parfumées au Thé of this world aren't for me, I suppose.
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  31. #31
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I just find them uninteresting. Sometimes when I smell an Aquatic on another person they smell fine but I just feel like they never sit well on my skin. I feel like I am wearing someone elses underwear

  32. #32

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I'm with TDI on this. My SO's sister wears D&G Light Blue beautifully. I wind up smelling like I fell in a vat of cleaning fluid.

    Melons, cucumber, many aldehydes (Chanel, I'm talking to you) and watery florals don't wear terribly well on me. I'm not a huge fan of Iso E Super either.

    For me, it is a matter of taste. Give me something with weight and creaminess anyday.
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  33. #33

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    To me, Aquatic = Generic. I have smelled too many aquatics to care about them - none of them smell particularly Oceanic to me.

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by MBDevine View Post
    My problem with them is the overpowering melon or cucumber notes I get from them. I'm not at all fond of melon and cuke makes me feel....well...salad-y rather than fresh green.

    I much prefer a nice oceanic scent - after much searching I have found several that are very true in composition (at least to my frame of reference) & can be layered with other scents.

    Yup, I'll second that. I have Cabotine Blue and L'Eau de Kenzo (woman) and I really like them both on hot days. I think aquatics COULD be the modern equivalent of citrus and Eau de Cologne, and I suppose Cool Water was that archetypical, epoch-making fragrance, but I don't like it because of that melon.

    It was a genre that got over-done and became ubiquitous back in the 90s, so I think it will be a while before it is explored again with any kind of real ingenuity, but I think it's got scope. How about an aquatic oriental? Shalimar pairs fresh citrus with rich vanillla, what about substituting Calone for Bergamot? Would it be magnificent or disgusting?
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  35. #35
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by Wordbird View Post
    How about an aquatic oriental? Shalimar pairs fresh citrus with rich vanillla, what about substituting Calone for Bergamot? Would it be magnificent or disgusting?
    No, reformulation is bad enough without giving the classics a high calonic!

    Just teasing, I think combining orientals with a touch of an aquatic note is an intriguing idea. I'm not so sure about Shalimar, but something with a bit of green bridge between its aquatic top and its spice could be great - perhaps a Mitsouko with dewy En Passant top notes?

    I'm trying to think in terms of those notes that I like as opposed to the heavier marine fragrances. Perhaps a dry vetiver? Maybe hay, tobacco and rose? Iris and incense? There are so many possibilities that spring to mind...

    Mike Perez has mentioned CdG's Cinnamon as a spicy aquatic - I'd be curious to try it.

  36. #36
    Lifelong Sniffaholic
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I like aquatic scents in body washes well enough, but in perfumes they smell too pedestrian. They smell...well...like body washes!

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I haven't yet found an aquatic I like.
    I find they stay unaltered and boring, as you said.

    I don't thing they sit well on the skin. I like soapy or green, but aquatic feels cold and strange, not an inviting smell...
    Last edited by *dora*; 29th December 2008 at 09:40 AM.

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    If I ever found an "aquatic" scent that actually smelled of ocean and not of the same tired old synthetics, I might actually like it.
    This. It might have something to do with me growing up basically on the beach, but I find myself very, very picky about 'ocean' smells - most of them just don't...smell like the ocean. One aquatic I do like quite a bit is Acqua di Sale (Profumum), but it still doesn't, to me, actually smell like the real live ocean does.

    Basically I think my combined problem with some aquatics is a)they don't smell like the ocean to my nose and b)it seems to be easy to create an aquatic frag that just smells too fake-y.

    I have the Escentric Molecules Iso E Super frag and I like it a lot, though. Dunno...I'm with other people on the weird airy, melon-y thing I seem to find in a lot of aquatics. Just don't like that note.
    "It's now very common to hear people say "I'm rather offended by that." As if that gives them certain rights. It's actually nothing more than a whine. 'I find that offensive.' It has no meaning; it has no purpose; it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. 'I am offended by that.' Well so fucking what." - Stephen Fry

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Aquatics are some of my favorite fragrances, actually. I'm sure a lot of my fondness for them derives from the fact that I love being near water. Off-hand, I can't think of any aquatics that I don't find at least somewhat pleasant to smell. I have occasionally gotten a strange sourness note from Issey Miyake L'Eau D'Issey Pour Homme, but it doesn't seem to be a consistent thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Asha View Post
    I smelled Calone while at Le Labo, and it nearly made me vomit.
    This is interesting, since you and I were standing together smelling the same sample vial at Le Labo. I actually thought Calone didn't have a very strong odor. I can see how the odor could be seen by some as sort of "sickly sweet", however. In any case, I didn't have nearly as strong a reaction to it. I wonder if I might have a bit of anosmia toward it that saves me from hating aquatics.

    Quote Originally Posted by LedByMyNose View Post
    This. It might have something to do with me growing up basically on the beach, but I find myself very, very picky about 'ocean' smells - most of them just don't...smell like the ocean. One aquatic I do like quite a bit is Acqua di Sale (Profumum), but it still doesn't, to me, actually smell like the real live ocean does.
    I also spend a lot of time near the ocean, and I agree that there is something missing from Acqua di Sale. But I've never been able to pin down what it is, although I suspect it might have something to do with seaweed or another plant note. There is also a strength to Acqua di Sale which appears to be an attempt to make up for missing that subtle je ne sais quoi. I still love it, though. It's one of my favorite fragrances.
    Last edited by Astaroth; 29th December 2008 at 07:43 AM.

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Two aquatic fragrances were mentioned that I like:
    Montale Sandflowers and Ayala Moriel Ecume des Jours.
    These differ from most aquatics for the following reasons:

    Montale uses juniper and oakmoss to create a dry, salty, open scent. Perhaps there is calone in it, but it does not dominate. To me, Calone is a sweet-smooth-salty, cucumber, watermelon note. I liked Sandflowers because it was not fruity at all. It achieved that diffusive, ozonic, breezy accord without calling to mind anything edible.

    Ayala Moriel actually uses seaweed in Ecume des Jours, which gives it a salty but plantlike aroma. This fragrance is quite unique. It has a whiff of that weird, washed-up seaweed aroma, but it is inoffensively buried under florals like tuberose, rose, and lotus.
    Last edited by purplebird7; 29th December 2008 at 02:18 PM.

  41. #41
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I admire Laura Tonatto's Oltre as a decent aquatic for a lady. I find most to be boring.

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by purplebird7 View Post
    Montale uses juniper and oakmoss to create a dry, salty, open scent. Perhaps there is calone in it, but it does not dominate. To me, Calone is a sweet-smooth-salty, cucumber, watermelon note. I liked Sandflowers because it was not fruity at all. It achieved that diffusive, ozonic, breezy accord without calling to mind anything edible.

    Ayala Moriel actually uses seaweed in Ecume des Jours, which gives it a salty but plantlike aroma. This fragrance is quite unique. It has a whiff of that weird, washed-up seaweed aroma, but it is inoffensively buried under florals like tuberose, rose, and lotus.
    I agree with your analysis. Calone isn't the only molecule being used to conjure an aquatic/marine feel in fragrances, although it is probably the cheapest and most maligned. There many other more complex aquatic molecules on the market, and some fragrances actually utilize a combination of herbs and other ingredients to conjure "aquatic"; these fragrances smell a bit more herbal and salty.
    Last edited by zztopp; 29th December 2008 at 05:41 PM.
    -

  43. #43

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    In my opinion because aquatics are too common. Thats why.
    "Burn their homes and churches.Then see if they will not laugh, sing and pray again.
    For when two of them meet anywhere in the world, see if they will not create a new Armenia."

    William Saroyan.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    Using: Antaeus, The Dreamer, Eau Sauvage and Voyage d Hermes

    Wishing: Tuscan Soul by Ferragamo and Concentré d Orange Verte




    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  44. #44

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    You've all mentioned many fine points-
    For me, Calone is easy to overdose and unmistakeably potent.
    It's rarely used with restraint.

    Aquatics seem easy to do badly.
    It 's much harder to find the use of a fine cyclamen note, certain melony or watery fruit/ vegetal notes that are of good quality- other ways to achieve a limpid effect.

  45. #45
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    I also spend a lot of time near the ocean, and I agree that there is something missing from Acqua di Sale. But I've never been able to pin down what it is, although I suspect it might have something to do with seaweed or another plant note. There is also a strength to Acqua di Sale which appears to be an attempt to make up for missing that subtle je ne sais quoi. I still love it, though. It's one of my favorite fragrances.
    Agree, agree, agree. I flove Acqua di Sale, too (Profumum is, imo, a very good line in general) but like you, I sort of vaguely identified the 'missing' bit as something vegetable. It's like sea air without the scent of the seaweed on it. Depending on the tide, the smell of seaweed can actually be quite rank and earthy, so maybe I should be careful what I wish for.
    "It's now very common to hear people say "I'm rather offended by that." As if that gives them certain rights. It's actually nothing more than a whine. 'I find that offensive.' It has no meaning; it has no purpose; it has no reason to be respected as a phrase. 'I am offended by that.' Well so fucking what." - Stephen Fry

  46. #46

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    So, it seems that the best "aquatics" include herbs/plants and/or saltiness. I love salty fragrances (for example, Fleurs de Sel, which has herbs and saltiness). How does a perfumer convey saltiness???

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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by Haunani View Post
    So, it seems that the best "aquatics" include herbs/plants and/or saltiness. I love salty fragrances (for example, Fleurs de Sel, which has herbs and saltiness). How does a perfumer convey saltiness???
    I'd be interested as well! Perhaps something some of our perfumers with a knowledge of synthetics have will fill us in on some of the new chemicals.

    One thing me and Mike Perez have noticed is that a natural ingredient that can give a salty effect is thyme oil ( I notice it quite strongly in both Diptyque L'Eau Trois and most strongly in Fleurs de Sel, both of which have distinct thyme notes ).
    Last edited by Sugandaraja; 30th December 2008 at 06:46 AM.

  48. #48

    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Same here! But can someone explain me then how come that girls fall for issey miyakeon guys??????! The worst smell ever! Top seller in the world ...

    Quote Originally Posted by mysticknot View Post
    Yes, I hate aquatic scents. There are so many good fragrances to choose from that aquatic scents are just not even on my list.

  49. #49
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    Default Re: Why are so many perfumista's turned off by aquatic scents?

    Quote Originally Posted by LedByMyNose View Post
    Depending on the tide, the smell of seaweed can actually be quite rank and earthy, so maybe I should be careful what I wish for.
    The smell of seaweed only starts to bother me when it gets into a state of decay. If it's fresh, I like it quite a bit. I think Profumum could improve Acqua di Sale with a fresh seaweed note. I wonder if they considered doing it, and rejected the idea for some reason. The notes already include marine algae, of course. Maybe they figured that would be enough.
    Last edited by Astaroth; 31st December 2008 at 03:09 PM.

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