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  1. #1

    Default Mineral make-up survey!

    [EDIT on 16th of May -09: the original survey is complete, thanks! Read on for the findings! Interesting stuff...]

    I'd love to know what you think about mineral make-up!

    Any opinions or personal experiences would be lovely, though I'd be particularly happy if you answered the following questions:

    1) What do you think “natural” means in relation to cosmetics ingredients?

    2) Have you heard about mineral make-up?
    If yes:
    3) What do you think mineral make up means?
    4) Do you use mineral make-up?
    5) Do you use any other make-up?
    6) How do you think mineral make up is different from regular make-up?

    I am going to use this information to help me understand how the general public and beauty shoppers have been influenced by mineral make-up marketing for a report. I'm probably going to write a short article/blog post type thing on it at some point. I won't use any names, but I will save the answers.
    Last edited by Nukapai; 16th May 2009 at 06:28 PM.

  2. #2
    Asha's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    It is my understanding that all makeup has always contained minerals. Talc and mica are some of the oldest used ones, but mineral colorants are also. If I recall correctly, the ancient Egyptians ground up Lapis Lazuli and Malachite to make blue and green eyeshadow. These days, that approach is cost prohibitive, so synthetic colorants are used unless the natural mineral colorants are cheaper (and still safe to use).

    The word "mineral" in the name of the makeup is just marketing, IMO. I have not tried any of them, but I suspect they are pretty much like most other cosmetics.
    Last edited by Asha; 5th February 2009 at 01:48 PM.

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    Sunnyfunny's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I use Bare Minerals foundation. I never wore foundation before I discovered it about three years ago, but have had various foundations applied by agressive SAs, all of which felt heavy and looked fake. I guess I bought the tagline hook, line, and sinker because I believe the company's claim that it is 100% pure minerals. I wore a Chanel pressed powder prior to Bare Minerals and Minerals keeps my oily spots under control. I don't even have to touch up all day. My skin is troublesome, and if this hasn't helped the problems, it has at least controlled some of them. If your skin runs dry, minerals might dry it out more. I use a trio of mineral eye shadows from Mary Kay and those are fine. I'm as happy with them as I am any other colors I have. I've heard that mineral colors are super pigmented and to apply with a light hand but that hasn't been the case with these shadows. They behave the same, IMO, but that may be because they are not pure, as the advertising says.

    There are a few mass market companies who have jumped on the bandwagon by making a mineral "blend." To the best of my knowledge, Sheer Cover and Bare Minerals are the only companies with a 100% pure mineral line. Bare Minerals is the only one I've tried, and I'm perfectly happy with it.

    As far as what natural means in cosmetics in general, probably what it means in food, which isn't much. Hope this helps!

  4. #4

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Asha View Post
    It is my understanding that all makeup has always contained minerals. Talc and mica are some of the oldest used ones, but mineral colorants are also. If I recall correctly, the ancient Egyptians ground up Lapis Lazuli and Malachite to make blue and green eyeshadow. These days, that approach is cost prohibitive, so synthetic colorants are used unless the natural mineral colorants are cheaper (and still safe to use).

    The word "mineral" in the name of the makeup is just marketing, IMO. I have not tried any of them, but I suspect they are pretty much like most other cosmetics.
    This is what I think too, but I am really interested in how people perceive the "new mineral make-up trend".

  5. #5
    jacona's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    1) What do you think “natural” means in relation to cosmetics ingredients? not much, it's pretty much a marketing ploy.

    2) Have you heard about mineral make-up? yes
    If yes:
    3) What do you think mineral make up means? made from ground minerals and pigments among other things

    4) Do you use mineral make-up? yes

    5) Do you use any other make-up? like liquid/cream foundation, yes on occasion, but loose powder is basically the only "mineral" product I use, i use blush, e/s, e/l, mascara, lip stuff, but none of it is marketed as "mineral"

    6) How do you think mineral make up is different from regular make-up? I don't really, I think it's a preference issue. I just like that the mineral powder I use is light weight and gives a nice natural, but polished finish without taking much time or effort.

  6. #6

    Therese's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Interesting questions. I am not up on moment-to-moment trends, so occasionally my younger daughter will insist that I try something. She insisted that I try the foundation powders from Everyday Minerals. I do love them. The powder foundation is light, comfortable, and easy to apply. The coverage is good, the look is flawless, and it doesn't wear or sweat off. Everyday Minerals is inexpensive and has a wonderful free sample program so that one can discover one's foundation shade without great expense. I find the loose-powder, mineral eye shadow more cumbersome to use; it is harder to control where the powder goes.
    I am not someone susceptible to hype. It is all about color and performance for me.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    It's not a new trend, millions of people have been using it for years, it's even in WalMart now. Since you are writing an article/blog, you should do your own research on ingredients and sales trends and come up with your own interesting insights, imo. I'm not going to hand you mine, just so you can stick your name on it.
    Last edited by beachroses; 16th February 2009 at 09:01 PM.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by beachroses View Post
    It's not a new trend, millions of people have been using it for years, it's even in WalMart now. Since you are writing an article/blog, you should do your own research on ingredients and sales trends and come up with your own interesting insights, imo. I'm not going to hand you mine, just so you can stick your name on it.
    Wow, why the hostility? Surely if you'd rather not participate in my poll it might be better just not to reply?

    This is part of a large body of research I've undertaken (including direct communication with colour suppliers, etc. I don't know what in my original post caused you to think that I wouldn't have conducted "my own research". And since judging from the content of your reply, you are familiar with research as a set of skills, it puzzles me that you don't know what a valuable contribution opinion polls and user surveys are. It's not research you can conduct in isolation - you need people to answer your questions based on purely their own experience. Other types of research - such as primary research, going direct to the source - can be conducted independently. I wasn't expecting anyone to part with their primary research here, though of course if someone wanted to discuss their findings in a friendly manner, I would be delighted).

    I'm sorry if I've somehow unintentionally offended you.
    Last edited by Nukapai; 16th February 2009 at 09:13 PM.

  9. #9
    beachroses's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukapai View Post
    I'm probably going to write a short article/blog post type thing on it at some point. I won't use any names, but I will save the answers.
    I got the idea from this.

    Contradicting your premise was legitimate and it is allowed on basenotes, it was not an act of "hostility" and there was nothing confrontational or against the rules in my post. HAGD

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    exquisitely me's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Hi Nukapai! I think its an interesting idea, and I'm curious to see what you find!

    I'm not sure what my skin type would be considered, but I'm 24 and acne has been a bear of a problem. So I've been using liquid concealer ("medicated" with salicylic acid), and blended as best as I could. I don't use additional liquid foundation or powder anymore because EVERYTHING seems to bring more problems. I'm not a severe case, but I have very light, near transparent skin, and any slight problem shows very clearly.

    My sister bought sheer cover, and was unhappy with it, so she offered it to me. I've seen the commercials and I've liked the idea. I don't like the chalky talc quality of powder, the way it feels on my face, or its weak concealment. I've had to apply it very heavy to get the job done, and it looks dusty, unnaturally even (skin as transparent as mine is supposed to show some color through). I was hoping mineral makeup was more pigment-based than talc-filled. Talc seems like a cheap filler than reduces the effectiveness while smelling unpleasant. When I tried Sheer Cover, it was all more or less the same. Somewhat better coverage, but not terribly helpful. Still had to apply it heavily to conceal anything, and still looked dusty. (the fine peach fuzz on my skin caught all of it and it looked terrible) I assumed Sheer Cover must have been an inferior product to Bare Minerals, but I really don't know.

    I hope you post your findings when you're done!! Best of luck, and I hope this helps.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by beachroses View Post
    I got the idea from this.

    Contradicting your premise was legitimate and it is allowed on basenotes, it was not an act of "hostility" and there was nothing confrontational or against the rules in my post. HAGD
    I really don't want to argue with anyone on here, so I will accept your explanation, though am left with total as to your (still) apparent need to be short with me. Why? I guess it doesn't matter. You are, of course technically correct in that you are allowed to post whatever you like on here within the user rules. Doesn't mean you should, unless you've got some particular reason to.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by exquisitely me View Post
    Hi Nukapai! I think its an interesting idea, and I'm curious to see what you find!

    I'm not sure what my skin type would be considered, but I'm 24 and acne has been a bear of a problem. So I've been using liquid concealer ("medicated" with salicylic acid), and blended as best as I could. I don't use additional liquid foundation or powder anymore because EVERYTHING seems to bring more problems. I'm not a severe case, but I have very light, near transparent skin, and any slight problem shows very clearly.

    My sister bought sheer cover, and was unhappy with it, so she offered it to me. I've seen the commercials and I've liked the idea. I don't like the chalky talc quality of powder, the way it feels on my face, or its weak concealment. I've had to apply it very heavy to get the job done, and it looks dusty, unnaturally even (skin as transparent as mine is supposed to show some color through). I was hoping mineral makeup was more pigment-based than talc-filled. Talc seems like a cheap filler than reduces the effectiveness while smelling unpleasant. When I tried Sheer Cover, it was all more or less the same. Somewhat better coverage, but not terribly helpful. Still had to apply it heavily to conceal anything, and still looked dusty. (the fine peach fuzz on my skin caught all of it and it looked terrible) I assumed Sheer Cover must have been an inferior product to Bare Minerals, but I really don't know.

    I hope you post your findings when you're done!! Best of luck, and I hope this helps.
    Thanks, that's a really useful real-life report

    Having studied the ingredients lists of a number of "mineral make-up" products, as well as spoken to the manufacturers of the raw materials & to colour cosmetics formulators, it's very clear now that the concept of "mineral make-up" is 100% marketing.

    You know that Maybelline Pure Colour Minerals liquid foundation (or whatever it's called) that they advertise with this whole "...your foundation - what's in there?" - well, turns out that their one (whilst perhaps oil free, like that's something new), contains 5 preservatives, 4 of which are parabens - and several silicones (just to clarify - I have nothing against these ingredients on principle, but I do find it wonderfully outrageous that these guys market as if their product was dramatically different from normal foundation). The pigments are mineral* pigments, but that's all that could possibly differentiate it from just your regular foundation. And since these types of pigments have been in cosmetic use for decades (some for centuries), it is not even much of a differentiating point at that.

    Talc's an interesting one: many mineral make-up powders contain large amounts, along with mica, titanium dioxide, zinc oxide and sometimes also bismuth oxychloride. Talc is harmless (unless inhaled in large quantities - just like any dust, it can cause lung damage), but many don't like the textures of overly talc-based normal powders. Nevertheless, talc IS a mineral (and one of the few things that you really can just mine, crush and put in your products, pretty much), so it is highly ironic that many mineral make-up brands specifically state that they are talc-free.

    I can see the appeal in well formulated "mineral" powders that are low on talc (or lack it entirely), but from a purely personal viewpoint, I didn't enjoy the unnatural oysterish glow on my face from the mica and bismuth oxychloride. The latter can also sometimes irritate skin & zinc oxide is known to cause a special kind of pore-clogging skin condition in workers who are exposed to it for prolonged periods. Nothing particularly alarming there; it's a good enough cosmetic ingredient if used appropriately, but the point is, so are the other ingredients that the mineral make-up companies seem to demonise. And NO make up should be left on overnight; no professional recommends that.

    Mineral make-up powders may sometimes be recommended by surgeons or skin care specialists because often they don't contain preservatives or perfumes (two ingredients that can cause irritation, particularly in the high percentages normally found in your everyday cosmetic product). The problem is that powders are notoriously difficult to preserve, so a lot of the core materials have to be irradiated by the ingredient manufacturers before they get formulated into the final product. This provides a microbiologically clean environment. Consumers aren't usually aware of this.



    * all of the mineral pigments used in cosmetics have to be synthetic because the ones from "crushed minerals" contain toxic levels of heavy metals and cosmetics manufacturers aren't allowed to use them due to regulations (too right). In addition, particle sizes are an issue: it is safer to produce these in the lab so that you don't end up with something that could produce micro-scratches on delicate skin (and cause irritation or worse as a result). The brands claiming that their make-up contains pure crushed minerals straight from the earth are either mis-informed, lying, or stretching the truth (you can technically get away with saying that the pigment is a natural mineral because the synthetic ones produced are nature-identical to the ones that occur in nature. The synthetic ones just don't have the levels of heavy metals and contaminants that would occur in naturally mined substances).

  13. #13
    exquisitely me's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Unbelievable!!! I should have suspected, but I wanted so badly for them to get it right this time... I'd have been furious if I had shelled out money for the Bare Minerals and find it was the same worthless stuff already out there (for much less money!!). Advertising like that is outright, unabashedly, appallingly unethical. They should be ashamed of themselves.

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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I bought some mineral make up eye shadow samples from someone who makes them herself at home. They blend well and colour payoff is sometimes very good and sometimes not that spectacular. I find the loose powder easy to work with, but you can get the same from MAC pigments.

    The fact that it is made at home worries me a little, I doubt there are regulations in place that guaranteed the same hygiene practises that large firms have to adhere too. I have had no bad reactions to the make up and it stays on decently with a base. I might find the colours I like in a different brand.

    I think the marketing of using a natural product that is affordable combined with the effect of loose powder application and easy blending that produces a nice result means people buy into it that itīs ībetterī than other brands and somehow īsaferī. While I have a feeling that mineral and normal both have their ups and downs.

    In general people dont know how long to keep anything and Id be concerned that because they think its natural they can keep things longer and will end up with irritated skin anyway. Also stop sharing mascara!

    Personally I like MAC a lot, they have any colour I could wish for, foundations that can be light or heavy depending on your choice, untested on animals and they have pigments which are incredible to use, good eyeliners too. You just need to know which one is suited for you and accept advice from SA.

    People need information and mineral makeup is unleashing a lot of information that is marketing. Thatīs why I think its such a success, and its cheaper than many other brands.
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.

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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Well, I kept hearing that the stuff is better for skin and I liked how it looked on other people, so I bought it and love it. I've been wearing bare minerals for almost three years and it has done for me what its marketers claim. I've eliminated one prescription med from my skincare routine since wearing it, it keeps my skin balanced, and (knowing how to properly apply, which is buffing with a light hand, is key) looks more natural than liquid. I stated above that I never wore foundation because I hate the way it looks and feels, but bare minerals is great, IMO. So *whatever* they put in it is working for me.

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    exquisitely me's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyfunny View Post
    Well, I kept hearing that the stuff is better for skin and I liked how it looked on other people, so I bought it and love it. I've been wearing bare minerals for almost three years and it has done for me what its marketers claim. I've eliminated one prescription med from my skincare routine since wearing it, it keeps my skin balanced, and (knowing how to properly apply, which is buffing with a light hand, is key) looks more natural than liquid. I stated above that I never wore foundation because I hate the way it looks and feels, but bare minerals is great, IMO. So *whatever* they put in it is working for me.
    Maybe Bare Minerals is superior to the Sheer Cover I was using. I would love for the stuff to work, since my holy grail has always been to find a light transparent makeup that would "soften" the look of imperfections, and could be effective when applied lightly. Is your skin anything like mine, Sunnyfunny? (leans towards oily, frequent small breakouts, despite fervent exfoliating and medicating)

    I'd like to think that my holy grail makeup is out there, and obtainable. Anybody tried both brands Sheer Cover and Bare Minerals? Any difference in chemical composition?

    (I also suspect my pores are just too receptive to clogging, via powder. I may try the "medicated" powder by Almay next.)

  17. #17

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Sunnyfunny View Post
    Well, I kept hearing that the stuff is better for skin and I liked how it looked on other people, so I bought it and love it. I've been wearing bare minerals for almost three years and it has done for me what its marketers claim. I've eliminated one prescription med from my skincare routine since wearing it, it keeps my skin balanced, and (knowing how to properly apply, which is buffing with a light hand, is key) looks more natural than liquid. I stated above that I never wore foundation because I hate the way it looks and feels, but bare minerals is great, IMO. So *whatever* they put in it is working for me.
    I think that's exactly the right attitude with make-up: just be aware that a lot of the advertising claims are probably too good to be true, but when you find colours, textures and formulas that give the effect you want and don't irritate your skin = bingo! Go with it!

  18. #18

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    FYI: I have two favourite make-up application methods that work for my skin at the moment. My skin is fair, sensitive, with some fine lines, pores and broken capillaries visible, but no major lines or imperfections.

    1) start with a suitable moisturiser (depending on season; winter base is more buttery because my skin drinks it up, but in the summer I like low-oil creams). Then apply highly pigmented liquid concealer where needed (under eyes, any blemishes) & blend well. Then I dust MAC face powder or Studiofix (depending on coverage I want; studiofix is high coverage) all over with a dense and stubby brush (it's actually meant to be a bronzer brush, but it's perfect for this purpose). Blend, blend, blend - and dab nose and chin with a foam powder applicator for more of a matte finish. This feels light and natural, but gives good coverage.

    2) If my skin is feeling dry, or I want more of a glowing look, I use a liquid foundation (usually MAC, although I also love Bobbi Brown). I take some liquid foundation on the back of my hand and blend it with 20-50% face lotion right there. I alter the amount of lotion depending on how much coverage I feel I need. Apply with a synthetic-bristle, dense, medium-wide and flat-ish foundation brush from the middle of the face outwards and from the forehead downwards. Press the rest in with pads of fingers. (At this point, a cream-based blusher can be added - it works wonders on the apples of the cheeks to make you look naturally blushed!). Any concealer can be added just to the areas that need it. Finally dust with finely milled powder and press nose and chin with a powder puff to set powder there.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    The whole minerals makeup craze was started by Bare Escentuals on QVC, as far as I can tell. Yes, other brands existed at the time, and even before then possibly, but I think they were confined to makeup salons and spas.

    Leslie Blodgett came on QVC and presented Bare Escentuals, a mineral makeup foundation, and using it became like a religion. I read QVC message boards at times, and the reaction to the makeup was unbelievably positive. Boards devoted to Bare Escentuals popped up all over the place with people exchanging ideas on colors, how to use it properly, etc.

    Here is a profile of Leslie B. She has become a very wealthy woman from the product.

    http://people.forbes.com/profile/les...blodgett/10475

    I finally caved and bought the makeup maybe two years into her QVC presentations. I did not like it, for one I don't like loose powder in my face, and two, if it spills, and it spills easily, it goes into every crevice in one's bathroom (just as it is supposed to do on one's face, supposedly). As for the final look, I was not that impressed.

    I stick mostly with liquid or cream makeups, my favorites of the moment being Sensai, a cream makeup, and Armani Silk, a liquid. I am fair and sensitive, my main problem being redness and capillaries rather than lines.

    As far as the hype and health claims of mineral makeup, I ignore them.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I tried Bare Minerals and could not believe how much I disliked it. The shade range is peculiarly narrow, and their lightest shade did not flatter my skin at all; it was a queer orange-pink. Moreover, the makeup sat in my pores and made them look enormous, and my entire face took on a maddening amount of shine, most likely due to the bismuth oxychloride.

    After my disappointing introduction to mineral makeup I tried Anna Bellina, which was a vast improvement over BM, but still not sheer, smooth, or skin-true enough; Aromaleigh, which was an improvement over Anna Bellina in terms of application and shade range; Alima, which was yet an improvement over Aromaleigh in terms of shade range, but which left my skin looking rather chalky; and finally, UGloGirl, which has been my only makeup for a year now. The UGloGirl never clumps in my pores, is not shiny, is skin-true and flattering, and feels wonderful on. So while the mineral makeup trend may offer more hype than hope, I truly have been extremely satisfied with UGloGirl.
    Last edited by Leesee; 21st February 2009 at 03:36 AM. Reason: I forgot to add a period to the end of my post!

  21. #21

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by beekmanhill View Post
    The whole minerals makeup craze was started by Bare Escentuals on QVC, as far as I can tell. Yes, other brands existed at the time, and even before then possibly, but I think they were confined to makeup salons and spas.

    Leslie Blodgett came on QVC and presented Bare Escentuals, a mineral makeup foundation, and using it became like a religion. I read QVC message boards at times, and the reaction to the makeup was unbelievably positive. Boards devoted to Bare Escentuals popped up all over the place with people exchanging ideas on colors, how to use it properly, etc.

    Here is a profile of Leslie B. She has become a very wealthy woman from the product.

    http://people.forbes.com/profile/les...blodgett/10475

    I finally caved and bought the makeup maybe two years into her QVC presentations. I did not like it, for one I don't like loose powder in my face, and two, if it spills, and it spills easily, it goes into every crevice in one's bathroom (just as it is supposed to do on one's face, supposedly). As for the final look, I was not that impressed.

    I stick mostly with liquid or cream makeups, my favorites of the moment being Sensai, a cream makeup, and Armani Silk, a liquid. I am fair and sensitive, my main problem being redness and capillaries rather than lines.

    As far as the hype and health claims of mineral makeup, I ignore them.
    Yeah, I read about Leslie in The Times Online article a while back - she may be the marketing genius behind this. I say genius, because you do have to admire what's she's managed to do: it's Emperor's New Clothes. Mineral make-up is "revolutionary" because she says so.

    The problem with that Times Online article is, of course, that the writer couldn't have had the time to research the topic thoroughly (nor is she likely to be a cosmetics formulation expert), so she suffers from the same problem as most beauty writers all over the world: having to take the company line and run with it - without really knowing whether they're telling the entire truth or not.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Leesee View Post
    I tried Bare Minerals and could not believe how much I disliked it. The shade range is peculiarly narrow, and their lightest shade did not flatter my skin at all; it was a queer orange-pink. Moreover, the makeup sat in my pores and made them look enormous, and my entire face took on a maddening amount of shine, most likely due to the bismuth oxychloride.

    After my disappointing introduction to mineral makeup I tried Anna Bellina, which was a vast improvement over BM, but still not sheer, smooth, or skin-true enough; Aromaleigh, which was an improvement over Anna Bellina in terms of application and shade range; Alima, which was yet an improvement over Aromaleigh in terms of shade range, but which left my skin looking rather chalky; and finally, UGloGirl, which has been my only makeup for a year now. The UGloGirl never clumps in my pores, is not shiny, is skin-true and flattering, and feels wonderful on. So while the mineral makeup trend may offer more hype than hope, I truly have been extremely satisfied with UGloGirl.
    I think the whole point with ANY make-up is that we should search and try to find textures and colours that suit us best - so I'm glad you've found something that really works for you!

  23. #23

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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Like Leesee, I tried the Bare Minerals brand a few years back and was disappointed. It did not work for my fair/pink skin tone (I also got the yellow/orange look). I think their color range has expanded since then, though. And, perhaps I wasn't applying it correctly, but I didn't like the powdery look and the mica sheen it left on my face, and I felt it accentuated my lines. I thought that it probably worked best on very young skin, and certainly wasn't for dry skin. Fast forward a few years...I was in the drugstore recently and saw the Jane line of cosmetics on a clearance sale, so I bought a little jar of their mineral makeup because the color looked perfect (all of the drugstore brands have a mineral line now). I thought I'd give it a shot (I paid under $2 for it), and turns out I like it. I use an eye concealer cream under it. There's no mica sheen, it's sheer and gives me a smooth finish, a little bit of natural looking color to my face without looking all made up. Its sponge applicator only allows a very small amount of the product to come through - so that may also be key, applying very sparely. But finding your right shade is crucial to wearing this type of make up well, imo. Half the time I use this rather than the Lancome foundation I have. Good luck with your research.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I use By Terry foundation now but have used mineral makeup in the past. Bare Minerals was horrible on me. What I liked best was by Morgen Schick. Unlike Bare Mineral's, it looked natural and didn't make me look older. She had a jar that held three colors so you could blend them for custom color and contour easily. She also sold another little pot of mineral powder called Task Master that worked as a concealer. That stuff rocked. It even covered broken capillaries. I found it all looked best if I set everything when I was done by spraying a little Na-PCA (the natural moisturizing factor found in human skin) in my hands and patting it on my face.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Oh, and as part of this project I've also made a point of reading all the foundation and powder ingredients lists from all makes I've come into contact with (some of my old tubes, things in supermarket, cosmetics counters).

    You know what? They could ALL be technically called "mineral make-up".

    So, conversely, mineral make-up could be called just "make-up". (Reasons why are explained further a few posts above).

    In some cases, where you look at some of the powder-based mineral make-up foundations, you could add a qualifying statement: "make-up as we've always known it, but this time, with fewer ingredients".

  26. #26

    Smile Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Nukapai View Post
    Yeah, I read about Leslie in The Times Online article a while back - she may be the marketing genius behind this. I say genius, because you do have to admire what's she's managed to do: it's Emperor's New Clothes. Mineral make-up is "revolutionary" because she says so.

    The problem with that Times Online article is, of course, that the writer couldn't have had the time to research the topic thoroughly (nor is she likely to be a cosmetics formulation expert), so she suffers from the same problem as most beauty writers all over the world: having to take the company line and run with it - without really knowing whether they're telling the entire truth or not.
    Yes, QVC is responsible for the "creation" of many brands, Bare Escentuals being the biggest, I'd say. It also put Philosophy and Smashbox on the map. Of course Oprah said she used "Hope in a Jar" and that helped put Philosophy on the map as well.

    Bare Escentuals continues to sell in huge amounts on QVC. I'm always astonished that there is still such a huge market. Leslie B has a very engaging personality, and I think that is half the reason, but there are so many addicted followers, the product must work for a lot of people.

    Another reason I do not like mineral makeup is that I have sensitive skin, and I think the less use of a brush on the skin, the better.

    I just bought Dior's new liquid foundation -- but the color is just not right. I read that Cle de Peau is coming out this spring with its cream foundation in a jar that has a twist top. You twist once and get enough of the product out for an application. I like that idea. As I mentioned above, my favorite foundation is my Sensai, but I don't like putting my finger in a jar -- over time, I think there is too much bacteria.

    Oh, another knockout foundation is SK-II, the one with the fine, fine spray.

    I'm a a bit of a foundation junkie, LOL!
    Last edited by beekmanhill; 22nd February 2009 at 12:27 PM.

  27. #27

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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I agree- technically all makeups can make the claim that they're mineral based. It's marketing... That said, I have enjoyed the liquid and powder foundations from Fresh. The base of their foundations is a clay that they use in one of their face masques. The reason I like it is that the clay has a mattifying property, and wears beautifully on oily skin (a real boon to people in texas in the summer!). For dry skin, be sure that you have a good primer or moisturizer, but I'd make that recommendation for any line.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    1) What do you think “natural” means in relation to cosmetics ingredients? A marketing ploy.

    2) Have you heard about mineral make-up? yes
    If yes:
    3) What do you think mineral make up means? made from ground minerals and pigments among other things

    4) Do you use mineral make-up? no, but have tried it in the past.
    5) Do you use any other make-up? like liquid/cream foundation, Yes, i use a Clinique cream foundation which I find has better coverage and doesnt end up all over my clothes when applying
    6) How do you think mineral make up is different from regular make-up? Doesnt contain as much water/oil ?? Probably good for those who like lighter coverage and have the patience to persevere in learning to use it properly.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Mineral makeup is more than just a new beauty trend - it offers health benefits for skin as well. And now you can make it at home! It's made of all natural, finely ground minerals from the earth, without many of the chemicals, dyes, and preservatives found in traditional makeup.

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    Last edited by infomercialscams; 14th May 2009 at 01:26 PM.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Yaaaaawn, shill alert. Seriously, at least read the thread you're in; it's quite critical of whatever you're peddling.

    As I'm here anyway... I have used small brand mineral makeup before and still do so from time to time, although it will never fully replace "regular" makeup. I enjoy it for the same reason I enjoy finding out about indie perfume brands: finding quality products outside the realm of the big drugstore brands, and supporting small, artisanal businesses.
    "Naturalness", "purity" and all that broohaha is pure marketing to me. It's an extremely hard to define concept in the first place, and being stretched to its limits by its use as an empty buzz word in marketing.
    It is known that there are an infinite number of worlds, simply because there is an infinite amount of space for them to be in. However, not every one of them is inhabited. Any finite number divided by infinity is as near nothing as makes no odds, so the average population of all the planets in the Universe can be said to be zero. From this it follows that the population of the whole Universe is also zero, and that any people you may meet from time to time are merely products of a deranged imagination.

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  31. #31
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    1) What do you think “natural” means in relation to cosmetics ingredients?
    A bunch of marketing mumbo-jumbo.

    2) Have you heard about mineral make-up?
    Yes

    If yes:
    3) What do you think mineral make up means?
    Clay? Ground?

    4) Do you use mineral make-up?
    Yes, I own the starter kit from Bare Escentuals, but don't like their mineral foundation at all. It goes on cakey and really accentuates pores and lines at the same time! Although I use their 'mineral veil' as face powder for mattifying effect.

    5) Do you use any other make-up?
    Concealer, but very occasionally, for my T-zone. Do not use fluid foundation.

    6) How do you think mineral make up is different from regular make-up?
    Don't know. Different marketing copy? :-)

  32. #32

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I'm glad there is some awareness (at least with our savvy members!) about how empty the whole "pure, natural minerals!" -thing really is when it comes to make-up. Anyone who cares to look can find that the cosmetic regulations wouldn't allow a natural mineral to be used in a make-up product. Loopholes allow this stuff to be spouted all over the place, but it does make me mad. Argh!

    I'd rather have my foundation with some stuff in it that makes it apply nicely and gives me smooth coverage

    It's all made using the same pigments anyway!

    P.S. Since starting this thread, I've had a go at MAKING colour cosmetics at our B Never lab and 4 of the shades will be launched into the shops! I spoke to all our colour suppliers about the mineral make-up trend and it was very enlightening...

  33. #33

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    To be fair, and I know not all mineral makeups can claim this, but one of the appeals of mineral makeups is the ones that are free of talc, parabens, 'phates, petro-chemicals, etc.
    of course, most of the mainstream drugstore brands that have "mineral" versions still contain talc and all of those things, which defeats the purpose of having any healthy ingredients (corn starch, plant extracts, etc)
    I have used both powder foundations as well as liquid. I have fair skin, but aside from using pancake makeup, I've found no liquid makeup, high end or otherwise, created the appearance of an even skin tone the way that powder foundations have.
    I think above all, the point is to be a savvy label reader (I mean the ingredients list, not the little claims on the package) and find out what works best for you. :-)
    I don't agree that using a brush is what necessarily causes face irritation. I think that using a bad brush can be irritating, but there are plenty of brushes on the market now, many affordable, that are very soft and silky and not scratchy at all. Makeup sponges can be just as scratchy.
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  34. #34

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    t one of the appeals of mineral makeups is the ones that are free of talc, parabens, 'phates, petro-chemicals, etc.
    Well, the thing is - there is nothing essentially wrong with most of those.

    Talc is harmless (unless you inhale it in large quantities, in which case - just like any fine dust particle - it can cause lung damage); many conventional cosmetics have talc & perhaps the only form to avoid it in would be loose face powder if you were really worried about breathing it in (but you won't have a problem unless you try to snort it, I don't think!).

    Parabens occur naturally in many fruits, for example, and we eat them in food every day. The synthetic versions made in the labs are nature-identical. They're very effective in killing off bacteria. The only legitimate problem with them is that many cosmetics companies have been over-preserving their products for years (to suit the needs of the cosmetics company so products can be mass-produced and sit in the warehouse & shops for years without going off). Over-preserving results in too high a quantity of these bug-killing things in your product. People can develop sensitivities over long time. (Any scary stories about parabens and cancer are based on discredited studies and should be ignored).

    Mineral oil isn't evil, per se, but it can clog pores, so it's a good idea to pick make-up products that don't contain it. (Traditional use in baby oil is appropriate because it forms a liquid film on the skin, preventing nappy rash).

    ....etc.

    The interesting thing about the loose powder-style mineral make-up is that it could technically be better for extremely sensitive or post-cosmetic surgery skin because it contains fewer ingredients. The marketing-spin will focus on the scare-stories, but that's the real way to look at it. The fewer ingredients you expose your skin to, the less irritated it will be.

  35. #35

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    It's not just "mineral makeup" or any advertising claims - I try to use fewer products that contain those ingredients in general . I believe in erring on the side of caution. Your skin is an organ - I pay just as much attention to what I put on my body as I do to what I put in my body.There are still a few things that I use that contain a few of those ingredients, but I try to reduce that amount and cut back where I can. I'm happy that more companies are listening to the demands of consumers and providing product options that don't include those ingredients.The point is that the option is there and that cosmetics companies are providing options that consumers want.
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  36. #36

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I have no problem with a company that is in the business of providing options. There are some brands that do that, without making misleading claims. Not many though.

    What I hate is when they slap on "paraben-free" and whatnot on the label. And talk about all the "scary nasties" in their marketing copy. That creates the notion that paraben-free is a good thing and logically, that parabens must therefore be bad. Which is bullshit.

    I hate scare-marketing, perpetuating mis-information and lying to customers in order to make a profit. (Often the paraben-free or SLS-free stuff is also more expensive, so not only are they misleading, they're charging a premium for the alternative. But then again, many of these stories were spread BY companies via mass-emails in the first place, to create panic & the need for people to have these "options" in the first place. Sneaky, eh?).

  37. #37
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Talc is a mineral, anyway. A company can include talc and still not be lying about it being "mineral" formulation.

  38. #38

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by Asha View Post
    Talc is a mineral, anyway. A company can include talc and still not be lying about it being "mineral" formulation.
    Exactly.

  39. #39

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    This seems less and less like an opinion poll and more like your soap box. I think this thread has a misleading label.
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  40. #40

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by AnonymousNose View Post
    This seems less and less like an opinion poll and more like your soap box. I think this thread has a misleading label.
    That's a completely fair comment - and I understand how it may appear so. But let me explain: when I started this thread quite some time ago, I was at the beginning of a big work project looking into what the fuss about mineral make-up was all about.

    I came here to ask what people thought about it. I am also researching for my blog (and ultimately for a book about the industry).

    About half-way through this thread, after I'd been to speak to all of our colour suppliers, spoken to colour cosmetic formulators & looked at the labels of mineral make-up (from the purist talc-free, paraben-free powder brands all the way to stuff like Maybelline liquids) I came back to report my findings (just in case the respondents might find them interesting!).

    Since then, I considered the case shut, but some folks have revived the thread.
    Last edited by Nukapai; 16th May 2009 at 06:27 PM.

  41. #41

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Oh, and in the end, I didn't blog about it - I'm still thinking about doing a piece on this topic, but it may have to wait for the time being.

  42. #42

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I just find it interesting, because I think there are myths perpetuated on both sides. Just because a product is labeled "paraben free" does not necessarily mean that is labeled in such a way that makes any claims one way or the other(some do, I unerstand that). I look for paraben free products (although like I said there are a few items I still use that contain these ingredients). Most of them simply state that they don't contain those ingredients, and I don't see how that's offensive or bad marketing. Also, I don't find it to be true that all paraben/sulfate/petrolatum/talc /aluminum free products are much more expensive. There certainly are brands out there that are very expensive. (For example, La Vanilla deodorant for $18!? Are you kidding me?)

    The face wash and face scrub that I use are free of those ingredients, and they're only about $7.99 (U.S.) each - which is about what I spent on the conventional products I was using, and I'm very happy with the quality and results.Of course, the quality has to do with what's in them and not what's not in them.Also, the label makes no ill claims of those ingredients, it simply states that it is free of those ingredients, then provides a list of the ingredients it contains and indicates which are naturally derrived and which are not.

    I price-compared some high-end cosmetics of similiar type and colors and to my suprise most of the products free of those ingredients were either about the same in price to their conventional counterparts or even a few dollars cheaper, depending upon the item. I'll admit that the organic deodorant I use is a good .75 cents (U.S.) more expensive than name-brand deodorant (and obviously more than generic brands) but that's not enough of a price difference to be off-putting, especially since I like it for other reasons, too. (scent, etc)

    I do agree that some product and cosmetic claims are a bit silly ("you can sleep in your makeup!")Well, we've all fallen asleep in our makeup at some point or another (or often LOL!) and our faces didn't fall off or become a giant zit or whatever. Obviously it's not a good thing to do all of the time, and I can't see, no matter how "healthy" the product is, that it's good to suggest that one do that.

    Kudos to you for doing your research, and perhaps this will make an interesting blog some day soon. I just hope it's understood that there is unfair rhetoric on both sides of the issue.
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  43. #43

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Quote Originally Posted by AnonymousNose View Post
    I just find it interesting, because I think there are myths perpetuated on both sides.
    I agree - in a way - though I've stopped thinking about the cosmetic industry as having any particular "sides" (because that implies that truthfulness somehow goes with one set of choices about ingredients and/or marketing - and dishonesty with another). I just think that there are companies that at least have a go at being genuine (Paul Mitchell haircare springs to mind; I'm not going to pimp the brands I work for because it will make me sound like an advertisement feature, but obviously I believe that the brands I work for are genuine. In fact I took a long-ish break from the industry because I got fed up of all the bull).
    Just because a product is labeled "paraben free" does not necessarily mean that is labeled in such a way that makes any claims one way or the other(some do, I unerstand that). I look for paraben free products (although like I said there are a few items I still use that contain these ingredients). Most of them simply state that they don't contain those ingredients, and I don't see how that's offensive or bad marketing.
    I used to think exactly that. But the more I thought about it, the more I felt that actually, by pimping on your label or your marketing copy that you're this-and-that FREE, aren't you adding to the problem of consumer mis-information? By stating that a product is fat FREE or sugar FREE or paraben FREE - well, you see the pattern - consumers have been educated to associate that with "Oh, so sugar = bad, fat = bad, paraben = bad".

    I mean; absolutely, when you're in business, you're in business of making money and you're in business of giving customers what they want. But shouldn't that be only to a degree? Should you not have some principles that you absolutely stick to? I believe so. There is one cosmetics company, Pixi, that does all the mineral make-up stuff, but they just sell it as make-up, that's it. I had a long chat with one of their staff the other day and I was so pleased at the kinds of responses I got "well, we've been doing this type of make up years, but we've never gone on about parabens or other things as anything nasty - when customers come in here, we explain to them what's available."

    So the customers are given a choice, but nobody is being subtly misled. I really respect that.
    Also, I don't find it to be true that all paraben/sulfate/petrolatum/talc /aluminum free products are much more expensive. There certainly are brands out there that are very expensive. (For example, La Vanilla deodorant for $18!? Are you kidding me?)
    They're not categorically more expensive, but mostly they seem to be. Depends what one sets up as comparison, of course. I mean - Creme de La Mer is obviously going to cost more than some small organic brand moisturiser. But when you look at the equivalent product (based on what the pot contains), you often find that there is a mark-up.
    The face wash and face scrub that I use are free of those ingredients, and they're only about $7.99 (U.S.) each - which is about what I spent on the conventional products I was using, and I'm very happy with the quality and results.
    I would love it if you posted the list of ingredients here and I could take a look!

    Of course, the quality has to do with what's in them and not what's not in them.
    That's what I'd think too! Alas, I was so frustrated to find out at last year's Natural and Organic trade show, that most consumers who are out shopping for organic and natural beauty care PRIMARILY about what's NOT in the product, rather than about the presence of beneficial ingredients (this is based on a survey conducted by the Organic Monitor).

    Also, the label makes no ill claims of those ingredients, it simply states that it is free of those ingredients, then provides a list of the ingredients it contains and indicates which are naturally derrived and which are not.
    Again; would love to see the ingredients. There are some lovely brands out there, but most of the ones I've seen put a lot of spin on what they contain. The best ones are ones that contain sulphates and say they're "natural coconut-based cleansers" (sulphates can be made from coconuts, usually with the aid of a bit of palm oil).

    I price-compared some high-end cosmetics of similiar type and colors and to my suprise most of the products free of those ingredients were either about the same in price to their conventional counterparts or even a few dollars cheaper, depending upon the item.
    (would love to see the ingredients lists, but it does seem that the pricing strategy in the States is ahead of what you tend to see in UK).

    I do agree that some product and cosmetic claims are a bit silly ("you can sleep in your makeup!")Well, we've all fallen asleep in our makeup at some point or another (or often LOL!) and our faces didn't fall off or become a giant zit or whatever. Obviously it's not a good thing to do all of the time, and I can't see, no matter how "healthy" the product is, that it's good to suggest that one do that.
    You're spot on about that! No skincare expert ever recommends sleeping in your make-up, no matter what it's made of.
    Kudos to you for doing your research, and perhaps this will make an interesting blog some day soon. I just hope it's understood that there is unfair rhetoric on both sides of the issue.
    Thanks And sorry for any confusion about my intentions - it's so hard to get proper intent across online sometimes

    Again, I would state that I don't really believe there are sides so much as there are companies that at least attempt to respect the intelligence of their customers, be transparent and not just jump on label-claim bandwagons. I don't know of any cosmetic company that has it 100% in every area of the business, but I wish there were more that at least had a go.

    In the long run, jumping on the bandwagons will come back and bite you on the bum. My favourite story of this is how the SLS/SLES is bad story was started. It is thought that Neways (direct selling toiletries company) started the whole scare as an email internet hoax. They'd brought out shampoo with an alternative surfactant. Now everyone is putting SLS/SLES free on their labels, but soon new regulations will force every sister-sulphate to be labelled as SLS anyway, AND since they paved the way for big moves towards these ingredient scares, the soil was ripe for lots of other similar stories to "break out". Now you look at Neways products and they wouldn't pass any modern discerning eco-shopper's scrutiny (they still use parabens, etc). Ooops? Wouldn't it have been better just to make good, effective products and sell them on their merits?
    Last edited by Nukapai; 17th May 2009 at 07:14 PM.

  44. #44
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Sorry to chime in so late. This is a very, very beneficial thread with lots of great information. Thanks a ton, Nukapai!

    Here's my two cents, for what it may still be worth:

    I used to use Clinique, EL, and had even tried Almay liquid foundations for my sensitive, combination skin. I tried to be diligent about cleaning my face every evening and caring for my skin, but I still suffered from dryness and breakouts from my dermatitis (which was a big problem for me when I lived in Florida, but not so much in California, unless I got lazy and slept in make-up, or wore it every day). Mineral make-up allows me to wear make-up daily and is even forgiving if I come home after a late night and hit the sheets without washing my face first (rare, but it's happens ). I don't know if I agree that it's all marketing and hype. I've been using BE for about five years and it's been great-- nonirritating and looks fabulous (once I figured out not to over-apply). I don't know if I think it's "all-natural" (I'm dubious, but that's my normal position on most things). I just know it works for me!
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  45. #45

    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    Oh no problem and no reason to apologise!

    My position remains, as you may have read up on above, that I'm all for what works best for the job at hand. Sometimes it's natural stuff, sometimes it's synthetic stuff (and sometimes it's hard to decide because you have equal pros and cons, so then you either toss a coin or go with whatever principles/morals/mission statements you might have ).

    If you've found something that works for you, that's wonderful.

  46. #46
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    Default Re: Mineral make-up survey!

    I guess I have to take back some of the negative comments I left earlier. I was at Sephora and found out that I probably have the wrong tone set. I saw that they also have a set with tones lighter than "Light" -- for those with fair skins with bluish undertones, which would have probably been the right kit for me. (I'm pretty sure that when I got it, there was no "super light" kit, that's why I got "Light" thinking it was the lightest). Also, the model for the "Light" kit was Asian, so that's why it's probably too yellowish on me (I am Caucasian).

    I do like the "Mineral Veil" and use it as face powder. I also discovered that if I use it on my lids as a base, my eye color stays on a lot better.

    Still, I'm not going out and buying a new kit. I'm probably not a foundation kind of gal.
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