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  1. #61

    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    It is also interesting to consider that the "weird" and the outliers usually become the mainstream with the passage of time..

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  2. #62

    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Surfacing View Post
    Better yet, just eliminate the "Super Members".
    You suggested it, not me
    Actually I do consider all those rating features on every forums as show-off something.
    Something to caress the one`s ego.
    I don`t mind if that feature will be deleted.

    Great addition about weirdness depending on climate areas!
    I - for one - hate L`Homme YSL for two things.
    I cannot bear that freshness molecule, it irritates me. And it`s weird for my nose.
    Also I was thinking - it is like something else, and it will be the hit in sales. So I better avoid it. Yes, also for the reason to be different from the crowd.

    And I should add a bit more in terms of `weirdness`.
    It`s not only niche frags, but also old-fashioned (vintage) fragrances that are discontinued - they are different and could be described as weird. and `smells like a grandma`s chest`... so it`s weird just because the time of popularity.

    Also weird could be those which just missed any popular and fashionable tendencies.
    Like leathery chypres are great and I like this family, but they were popular some time ago!
    Or leather. Or something else.
    Vetiver The Great!!!

  3. #63
    Lian's Avatar
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    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentronic View Post
    You will buy whatever I say and you will shut your mouth and like it!
    Sounds like you are wearing Bvlgari Black. Sexy




    I think that you are right, for many of us here weirdness is important. We often seem to want something different and a lot of the mainstream offerings smell kind of alike and after a while we also notice the quality is often poor.

    For me and others that's a reason to go into niche or some good designers.

    Perfumes do get hyped because on basenotes we are all about sharing our latest finds in case someone else *might* like it, you arenīt obliged to like it and many here donīt like Kouros or other HG fragrances. But we may have maybe learned to respect them as a creation. Like Art, it could be something that you wouldnīt want to have in your house but you can understand why other people are raving about it. Still, you arenīt obliged to buy it if you donīt want it on your wall.

    I donīt think any of us want to influence or even dictate what people should like, but they offer their opinions of a scent and yeah some may come off a bit elite in judging a scent like an art critic, but you donīt have to agree and you can say you do not agree. Just join in the discussion, itīs what the site is for.

    What is kind of funny is that we( or at least I) like to wear perfumes that aren't that popular around us, but we do recommend it to others as well. So we are shooting ourselves in the foot if we like the weirdness and the īnot worn too often by othersī aspect of a perfume while getting others all excited about it.
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.

  4. #64
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    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    Quote Originally Posted by surreality View Post
    For some people the whole "I smell like no-one else I know is important"; however, I think that some of us got into "weird" fragrances not as an act of rebelion or as an expression of individuality but as explorers of what the world of scent can offer. I came here looking for a nice musk scent and something light and citrusy for summer wear but before too long basenotes had taken me on an olfactory rollercoaster ride. The suggestions of the "super members" opened my eyes to the world of niche perfumery, without them there is no way I would have found Serge Lutens, Parfumerie Generale, Montale, Histoire de Parfums or many other houses that I consider an integral part of my current wardrobe.

    I may be way off base, but I don't think many new members want Basenoters to suggest stuff that they can go check out at the local Perfumania or Macy's. Complaining that "super members" suggest "weird" fragrances or seem to discount many mainstream frags on a board dedicated to all things fragrant that has quite a few fragrance experts is a bit like going into an exotic restaurant and complaining that the wait staff only suggest "weird foods."
    I think what some feel though is that personally weirdness may be fine to play with but overall they shouldn't be deemed "simple," "uneducated in scents" or "unrefined" if they aren't really impressed with the whole niche groupings and if their individial nose leads them to appreciate designers that just smell good on them. To tell you the truth, I rarely smell alot of scents on other men and when I do they are usually bathing in them. In my profession and groups you just don't get the bathers. Since each skin is different I think a person can still smell outstanding and be his/her own person without worrying whether others are wearing it. As I've said, and this is not cut, I've, over the last year, expereinced many niche scents and enjoyed many for what they brought to the table but I'm not so impressed that I find their uniqueness any better than others. I guess overall my reasons for being here or wearing a scent are pretty bare bones.
    "As you walk down the fairway of life you must smell the roses, for you only get to play one round."
    --Ben Hogan

  5. #65
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    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    To answer your question directly, no, wierdness in a scent is not important. What is important is that the overall scent "works".An earlier poster or two related this to music and art, which IMO is a viable comparison. My background is an engineer, but I majored in music, and your question made me think of my days in music school. I have played a lot of music that might seem wierd, but in the end, is great music because it just works - when you play it and analyze it, it is so good that it is hard to imagine it being any other way - it is just "right".

    As another poster noted, music is largely about the creation and resolution of dissonance. To me, great fragrances are similar. I suppose that is why my favorite fragrances are a bit different. I am or was a brass player, so my musical tastes tend toward composers like Prokofiev, Bartok, Shostakovich, Mahler, Bruckner, Strauss, etc. My fragrance tastes tend toward fragrances like Terre d'Hermes, Encre Noire and M7 / M7 Fresh. But, I also own and like more mainstream fragrances like Clinique Happy, Chanel Antaeus and John Varvatos, so go figure.

  6. #66

    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    At heart I am a bolshy S.O.B.

    I take nothing as a given and find many so called Holy Grails (BdP being a prime example) over-rated and unappealing to my nose. Does that make me right and others wrong. No. It means that a difference of opinion or preference is being expressed.

    I love some niche fragrances which concur with others' opinions. I also love some mainstream fragrances - I still absolutely love Mont Blanc Presence and feel great wearing it.

    I don't really care too much if what I like isn't a holy cow to the art of fragrance. If I like it, I like it. More importantly if it smells great on me, that's the over-riding factor.

    It is also inescapable that the two fragrances I get most compliments wearing are Platinum Egoiste and Desir by Rochas. I'm newly and happily single. Will I wear Blenheim Bouquet out in the evening if I am going to attract a woman? Not a chance of it, I'll go with what I like wearing which is going to appeal to women.

    Do I like weird notes in fragrances? Sometimes I do, yes. I recently bought Mister by Jasper Conran because it had something about it that wasn't fresh and zesty. It has been slated in the reviews on BN. Do I care? Not a jot of it. I really like the way it dries down and becomes a very sexy fragrance. So much so my current lover not only loves the smell of it, she loves the taste of it on my skin too (strange I know, but hey, she's a passionate woman so I'm not complaining!)

    Would I look down on someone for liking Paco Rabanne 1 Million? No, who the hell am I to do that? I don't like it (I think it's clunky in its drydown). It just doesn't work for me. Similarly Creeds leave me unimpressed and I've yet to find a Serge Lutens that I like enough to pay the money. On the other hand, I love Bois Des Iles and just wish it weren't so expensive!

    Ultimately, as someone said earlier, it's like music. Some of the alternative stuff out there loved by music snobs leaves me cold. I would much rather listen to some good old roots country or some brain-blattering heavy metal than try and be cool.

    I like what I like. If it's crap to my nose, it doesn't matter what the label says.

    Fragrance is about smelling how you want to smell, not impressing a handful of experts.

    And given the choice between impressing an attractive woman and turning her on by smelling great or impressing someone who likes obscure niche scents, I know which I prefer!
    In a world where people smell bad, it is the personal responsibility of every Basenoter to improve the world one SotD at a time...

  7. #67
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    Default Re: Is weirdness in a scent so important?

    Weird is an interesting term to use; I am sure when No 5 Chanel first arrived on the seen, it might have been termed different/weird but is now viewed as a "classic". Unfortunately it is also called a "grandma-scent" so that shows how things might eventually become mainstream over the decades.
    I personally concur with Wordbird, and what she echoed from Luca Turin; a fragrance just needs to 'smell nice' sometimes.
    I have a large collection of scents, very large to some, but I do not consider anything weird. Yet, many people would not wear a lot of the scents I wear because they are "heavy-hitter" scents, but to me they are lovely, albeit not 'weird' in any way, yet not universally loved.
    Now on the other hand I have smelled many scents which are well loved/coveted/admired here on the site, and am left quite cold, and unmoved by them, actually sometimes disturbed by them (Nasamoto)
    Now are they unpleasant fragrances, not exactly, but there is something 'weird' about them, in my opinion.
    In this matter, I think many new fragrances are trying to push the envelope of what a scent should be; sometimes I wonder if they keep the "should smell nice" idea in the back of their creative minds.
    Are they pushing the envelope with scent just to present us with the "lobster-flavored ice cream" equivalent in perfume form. Do all these weird/unique/newly sourced essences really add beauty to a scent, or is it just the 'newness factor'. I know that is what is one of the biggest selling points in the world of cosmetics/skincare/fragrance, at least here in the states, and in large cosmopolitan retail hubs. I learnt this over 20 years in the cosmetic world, and have seen many things come and go.
    So is weirdness in a scent there to enhance the overall beauty, or just to hype and sell more, Usually at very high prices.
    I think many people go for the uniqueness factor, but is the overall beauty factor being sacrificed at the same time.
    I think that a true innovator of scent could use what is readily available, and create a masterpiece all weirdness aside.
    Last edited by Brielle87; 16th February 2009 at 08:35 PM.
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