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  1. #31
    Beebee's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Quote Originally Posted by purplebird7 View Post
    Your observations are astute. When society changed and women moved, en masse, out of their homes and into the workforce, their lives and their children's lives were profoundly changed. Perhaps this is the root cause of the shift in popular taste away from challenging scents to light-hearted fruity florals and home-baked-cookie comfort. Could it be that we have seen the enemy, and the enemy is us?
    I was in college in the early 70's, strongly independent and glad I was not coming of age in the same world that my mother did. I wore Chanel Cristalle the moment it came out in '74 at the ripe age of 19. -- PB, you ask an extremely interesting question and one I have mused upon, and been frustrated by, for several years... Your observations, as I am sure you know, extend far beyond our fragrances. The whole "art" of a being family came to a crashing halt (or developed "new rules" depending on you look at it) when we (women) asked for equality, went to work to earn our own money and have a career, and when we decided that single-motherhood could, in fact, be handled as long as we agreed that it was OK to have someone else raise our babies. The economy and the family, over time, changed significantly as we entered the work force and single-handedly created the 2-income household... with taxes to match which made the government very happy!

    So... what? Be careful what you wish for? Who knows. But, I gotta tell you... up until PBs question here, I never thought that this whole argument would spill over to my fragrances... And now, frankly.. I'm a little pissed off!
    Last edited by Beebee; 13th March 2009 at 05:20 AM.
    Bel Respiro, I adore you... but my heart belongs to another.

  2. #32

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Oops. Sorry! Hope I didn't ruin it for you!
    I guess it could have been another issue, besides women in the workforce, to touch off this discussion, but I can't help but muse over the irony.
    Once we women became tough (I mean really independent and in control of our own destinies) that popular tastes turned soft, even gooey.
    I mean, there were the stay-at-home mothers in dresses and high heels wearing Butch perfumes of leather, tobacco, smoke, and green chypre. Cuir de Russie, Cabochard, Scandal, Habanita, Miss Dior...
    And now we haul ourselves off to work each morning, drag ourselves back in the evening, take care of the kids, our parents, our houses, our yards.
    And the industry gives us perfumes that smell like little girls, cotton candy, and cookies?
    Funny! Oy.

  3. #33
    Lian's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Let's consider perfume as another art form for a moment. Compare it to paintings. Now in paintings many people feel that you can tell a lot about a society when you look at its art, it's a reflection of society and you have artists who do a good job at satisfying current demand and are very popular. Then there are artists who make that is not in fashion, that the majority of people do not appreciate as much. You can give people what they want to see, or you can show them something else because you think it matters.

    In perfume I think you can continue this analogy and take it further. For many having pictures on the walls also has a function, it can brighten up a room very quickly and it just ..well you grew up with it maybe? You see it everywhere in houses and in magazines. Empty walls almost frighten people, the eye needs something to look at. Now you can think long and hard about what you want on your walls or you go to ikea and buy something random that will leave everyone indifferent and still gives you something on the walls. Or you get some cheap poster, again you have something on your wall.

    Is it art? Probabloy not, is it interesting to follow ikea trends? Maybe over the long run in many many years people will be able to see and be able to tell something about our society and the fact that we even have an ikea.

    For perfume I think the same applies, we have old masterpieces that are appreciated by art critics, who may appreciate it beyond the simple ' i need to have stuff on my wall' or ' i need to wear perfume' . We have ikea type scents that just gives everyone something to wear and like, that doesn't stand out too much but does the job at hand. We may have modern day artists that aren't appreciated yet or only by a few and we have brands that are above ikea quality, that are skilled at what they do and typical examples of decent or good perfume in this era.

    Like art I think generations to come will draw their conclusions about why most people wear what they do and why it suited this era. I don't like it if we do this with a tone of looking down on perfumes and on people because they do not meet a standard of another generation.

    Maybe they feel they no longer need leather scents and they can enjoy gourmande and girly scents because it is more accepted and they do not need to fight for equality? They don't have to feel ashamed of being feminine?

    There can be so many reasons for explaining this taste of the era, but maybe everyone here is too closely linked to it judge it objectively? We don't have the distance to judge it fairly I think.
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.
    Currently wearing: L by Lolita Lempicka

  4. #34
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    First they butcher 1000 beyond recognition, and then discontinue it? I didn't care much for the post-P&G 1000 anyways. It just isn't the same after you have experienced the real stuff.
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  5. #35
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    Question Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Any sources for vintage Jean Patou 1000 please?

  6. #36

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Long time lurker etc...
    Found some parfum on fragrancenet.com... don't know if it is still there. LOVE this one, recent discoverer of Joy and Patou Forever (substitute Rasberry for jasmine in Joy, never liked fruity florals but this one too good to resist). Farewell Patou, thak Godess I had a chance to smell the real thing. Wore Sublime on my Wedding day...

  7. #37

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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Lian I like your art analogy and think it is appropriate here. I just would like there to be some way to still have these more challenging perfumes available. I also agree that I am way too close to be objective about it.
    What is disappointing, to me, is that P&G went to all of the effort to begin to revitalize the Patou brand only to reverse course. I would like to know what caused the reversal in thinking in the P&G Fragrance division.

    Purplebird, the women on this board are certainly in a better position to answer the sociological question you've posed. I would be disappointed to find that after all of the strides we've made as a society that women feel the need to follow the herd and can't envision themselves as individually as anyone else. As before this community is probably not the place for that answer as the women here are clearly one-of-a-kind and so far from the herd mentality as to be unable to spell herd.
    More writing on fragrance by me to be found at http://www.cafleurebon.com/

  8. #38

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Lian and SMM, you are right. We are in no way typical consumers of perfume.
    (I have to admit a strange affinity for IKEA furniture, though!)
    The decision at Proctor & Gamble probably reflects cost as much as it does demand. I bet that Jean Patou's fragrances simply do not offer them the profit margins that they desire. Hence, they will judge their "low sales numbers" more harshly than a perfume that is created with cheap synthetics.
    Mudassir, and N_Tesla, I have never smelled vintage 1000. Even the new one was, to me, more beautiful and stately than most new perfumes that I was impressed with it. If either of you ever gets ahold of the vintage formula, I will be jealous.

  9. #39

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    If you can believe it, Joy has been discontinued as well, at least in North America. I have been scouring high and low here this week (Canada) trying to get a new bottle and the places that used to carry it (Bay & Holt Renfrew) both have said it's discontinued in North America.

  10. #40
    kumquat's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    When do they ever change something and improve it? It's always the other way around. They get you hooked on a good product, then pull the rug out from under you. It will catch up to them eventually.

  11. #41
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    I will go out on a limb here and try to sum up what has happened to the world of perfume.
    When I worked in Sephora,amongst all my other places but we will use S. because of selection, women were not drawn towards the "classics". I would try day in and day out to show No 5, Shalimar, L'Air du temps, Joy, 1000, Miss Dior (for the moment we carried it) and many others. These women did not want any of it, they would always say "This smells like old lady." or "This smells like my mother/grandmother/aunt/great-grandmother." They all wanted new, hot, designer, celebrity, what everyone else was wearing. Once when someone used the "old lady perfume line" on me, I said "Oh, you would rather smell like a 12 year old playing in a bowl of ambrosia." They would just laugh and think I was joking with them, which I was not, but they wanted to be in leagues with their juniors.
    Women in the states, I will make a sweeping generalization, have an obsession with youth and brand names. Not all of course, but a 90+% majority of all clients I have ever dealt with. So they veer towards fragrances a girl would wear, or the hottest designer bandwagon scent, or (even worse) a celebrity scent.
    How can any of the classic "houses" go head to head with an unnatural obsession with youth. It is impossible, this is why they are allowing scents that have survived 2 world wars to fall off the charts, they would rather hawk some piss that is "trendy"
    So in a nutshell; hooray for the woman's movement and equal rights, women have to try and act eternally cute and youthful. Which is sad, because I myself love the wisdom I have acquired with age, and acting like a lady as opposed to a school-girl.
    This may not have hit any "nails on the head" exactly, but it is my take on things. So all of this, combined with EU restrictions on ingredients, makes one wonder about the future of scent.
    I always wanted to smell like my elders, sophisticated and elegant, I do not see what is so "old" about that. We are bound to weep over many more casualties of our beloved fragrances as the years pass, this is one thing I have become accustomed to; not accepting of, but accustomed to.
    How can one fight the onslaught of youth, especially when it is augmented by adults striving for "eternal" youth.
    Until women start to feel comfortable in their own skin and accept aging as part of life, not something to be fought until the bitter end, we will see more scents "die" and be replaced by a fruity/juicy concoctions.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

  12. #42
    kumquat's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Well, Brielle, I know you are right but it is just so sad. I will never understand this comparison to "old lady/man perfume" with complex & interesting or out of the ordinary perfume. Or just plain beautiful. And don't people get tired of all the scents smelling alike? I really cannot tell one from another anymore. The good news is Jlo & Paris Hilton & Britney are all going to get old some day and I can't wait to see those perfumes get cancelled. That will be the day I break out the champagne & party like it's 1994!

  13. #43
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Quote Originally Posted by kumquat View Post
    The good news is Jlo & Paris Hilton & Britney are all going to get old some day and I can't wait to see those perfumes get cancelled.
    I hate to say that they will never grow old, I really think they are femme-bots. They will just keep having comeback, after comeback, and flood the market with more scent. Mediocre scent to top it all off, why oh why cruel fate!
    On a serious note though; I do not understand why everyone wants to smell the same, or why scents are pumped out quicker than new flavors of Hershey's kisses.
    Just like you, I am praying for the day I can say "I saw the debut of (insert name of crappy scent) now I am witnessing its demise."
    At least at the end of it all we have Estee Lauder, who I found out will keep producing a product if less than 2% of the overall sales of it are met. Go Youth-Dew!!!!!!!!! huzzah, huzzah!!
    Last edited by Brielle87; 14th March 2009 at 09:38 PM.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

  14. #44

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Ugh! Another thing about that ridiculous "old lady/grandmother" association: These "old ladies" and grandmothers, had very probably been wearing those beautiful perfumes since they were much younger ladies; they could have been long time signature fragrances. Only by the time the youths got around to being able to verbalize about the fragrance, were the ladies old enough for the youths to call them "old ladies," hence the association. Silly.

    What's an extremely popular fragrance now? Angel. It's also regarded as a new classic by some. Will this be considered an "old lady" fragrance by future grandchildren?

  15. #45
    Lian's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    For me describing something as an old lady scent means that you don't feel mature enough to pull it off. These perfumes are heavy, they are present and maybe more present than the woman in the shop herself is. For me that is what I mean with old Lady perfume, I do not have the presence to pull it off. It would wear me instead of me wearing it.

    Again we are judging people rather negatively for using the ' old lady' description. And maybe they do not want to smell like their grandmother? Can we fault people for that? You can't change the associations people have with just a visit to a perfume shop.
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.
    Currently wearing: L by Lolita Lempicka

  16. #46
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    I don't know, the connotation that was implicit in the comment to me, by clients, of "old lady scent" meant old grandma. Many people elaborated with "You know, this type of perfume, mothballs, and all that granma smell." I don't think they were worried about the heaviness of it, because the way they doused themselves with Pink Sugar I could have used an oxygen tank for myself.
    But I think that is the difference, woman always made the scent their own, now many women want to find a scent that fits with them and their lifestyle.
    I do understand this though; many of my friends were perplexed when I wore Shalimar and Arpège, not to mention Youth-Dew, at a very young age. But I was always an "old soul type". They were happy with Yves Rocher body spritzes.
    The only sad part is, in my experience, that most women these days never feel they have reached the point when Shalimar, Youth-Dew, or No 5 become their signature scent, in turn many classics will stop selling. This means that more and more will go the way of 1000, My Sin, Scandale, and so many others.
    As the saying goes; chacun à son goût (each to their own taste), I fully support this, but it is becoming very homogenized and that is when the classics start passing.
    Last edited by Brielle87; 15th March 2009 at 01:01 AM.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

  17. #47

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    I've been watching this thread with great interest...
    Not much that I can add, because so many have expressed it very well- turning the prism, holding it up to the light.

    One difference here:
    Perfumes had personalities, and society allowed women to enjoy those personalities- without regard to 'old' or 'young'.
    Yes, there was plenty of sexism. No doubt. I was there.

    Now, women and men have to be careful NOT to OFFEND.
    The non-scent, the skin scent, the easy scent.
    The comfort scent.

    Perhaps, we are not nearly so confident as we pretend-
    And, with their Madison-Avenue-killer-instinct-
    This has been detected and played....
    Along with all of the PC-ness inherent.

    And we have the IFRA responding in a reflexive fashion.

    Only niche perfumers who don't attract too much scrutiny- will be able to'get away with' creating ballsy scents.
    And only, for as long as they are able/ willing/ and appreciated.

    I think that we need to be more vocal, as a group-
    And continue with our protestation.

    I have no difficulty with what is being produced- if it makes folk happy-
    But it should NOT be to the exclusion of the art we risk losing.

  18. #48
    Brielle87's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Hip hip hooray!!! Hip hip hooray!!! for Chaya. You have put it perfectly and of course ever so eloquently.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

  19. #49

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    One thing to consider which Chaya touched on is that so many ingredients are becoming restricted due to IFRA regs. Even fragrance launched just 5 years ago are having to be reformulated to ensure they make sure they do not contain banned materials.

    Sometimes older fragrances cannot be reproduced accurately because of this. Add in also the fact that fragrances we all adore such as 1000 and Patou pour Homme shift may shift very few units even in France, and so the costs of reforfumlating fragrances (which can be as much as creating a new fragrance) can be prohibitive

    It's all new, new, new these days. That's what the consumer wanted, so its what they've got
    Currently wearing: Gardénia by Chanel

  20. #50

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Hurray, Chaya and Grant! I wholeheartedly agree. The dearth of perfume as art (and the often prohibitively expensive niche perfumes that maintain the art) led me to DIY. I've spent several years and substantial bucks pursuing the weird, the (sometimes) beautiful, and the IFRA-banned scents that I love. I mostly wear my own things now...and that's sad, because I love discovering the work of others. Thank goodness for Luckyscent samples and bottle-splits!
    This really is an art form, and profit-driven mega-corporations, in tandem with overprotective government bodies, will kill it if we don't keep it alive. Promote and protect the artisans, learn how to do-it-yourself, and write about good perfumes and your passion for them.

  21. #51

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    What about releasing the formulas when they are discontinued?
    Like open-source code for computers?
    Why not? The company could even stipulate that the name be changed for the "new" product.
    I would buy a 1000 or Joy re-make from a niche house that tried to do a good job of reformulating.
    It would be better than nothing.

  22. #52

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Take heart. I am convinced that the fruity/floral era too shall pass. One day a younger generation will realize that their elders have been wearing "candy and cupcakes" their entire lives. The "new" young generation will get this very "original" idea in their heads that they want to wear something that is actually SEXY. Not that the older fragrances smell "sexy" per se but they do not smell like something a little girl would wear. I let my 10 year old wear today's popular releases because they are almost indiscernible from scented lotion and body products. They (the "new" younger generation) will think themselves very bold to wear "spicy" fragrances. Of course I'll probably be 70 by then!


    Quote Originally Posted by Brielle87 View Post
    I will go out on a limb here and try to sum up what has happened to the world of perfume.
    When I worked in Sephora,amongst all my other places but we will use S. because of selection, women were not drawn towards the "classics". I would try day in and day out to show No 5, Shalimar, L'Air du temps, Joy, 1000, Miss Dior (for the moment we carried it) and many others. These women did not want any of it, they would always say "This smells like old lady." or "This smells like my mother/grandmother/aunt/great-grandmother." They all wanted new, hot, designer, celebrity, what everyone else was wearing. Once when someone used the "old lady perfume line" on me, I said "Oh, you would rather smell like a 12 year old playing in a bowl of ambrosia." They would just laugh and think I was joking with them, which I was not, but they wanted to be in leagues with their juniors.
    Women in the states, I will make a sweeping generalization, have an obsession with youth and brand names. Not all of course, but a 90+% majority of all clients I have ever dealt with. So they veer towards fragrances a girl would wear, or the hottest designer bandwagon scent, or (even worse) a celebrity scent.
    How can any of the classic "houses" go head to head with an unnatural obsession with youth. It is impossible, this is why they are allowing scents that have survived 2 world wars to fall off the charts, they would rather hawk some piss that is "trendy"
    So in a nutshell; hooray for the woman's movement and equal rights, women have to try and act eternally cute and youthful. Which is sad, because I myself love the wisdom I have acquired with age, and acting like a lady as opposed to a school-girl.
    This may not have hit any "nails on the head" exactly, but it is my take on things. So all of this, combined with EU restrictions on ingredients, makes one wonder about the future of scent.
    I always wanted to smell like my elders, sophisticated and elegant, I do not see what is so "old" about that. We are bound to weep over many more casualties of our beloved fragrances as the years pass, this is one thing I have become accustomed to; not accepting of, but accustomed to.
    How can one fight the onslaught of youth, especially when it is augmented by adults striving for "eternal" youth.
    Until women start to feel comfortable in their own skin and accept aging as part of life, not something to be fought until the bitter end, we will see more scents "die" and be replaced by a fruity/juicy concoctions.
    One man's trash is another man's treasure. Especially when it comes to perfumes ...

  23. #53

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Thanks for resurrecting this excellent thread! Some very true words spoken! I can't see any possibility for a return to more natural and opulent, rich in the future. We have moved away so much everywhere (including perfumery). It is just not going to happen. I mean how 'funny' is that - I wear jeans and T-shirt with a sillage from classic Guerlains and get complimented by women, who in turn mostly smell like their cheap bathroom refreshers or sickly sweet fruit candies. I'd rather 'take a bite' from myself.

  24. #54
    kumquat's Avatar
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    I am hoarding this 1000. I have a new bottle from Neimans I bought when this thread first ran and an open bottle I bought when I first discovered how good it was back in 2007 or so. (Shortly after joining BN)

    I remember feeling really annoyed when I first tried it and was so thrilled by it - Where had this been all my life? I've been trying all this drek in department stores all these years and this great stuff has been here-unknown and unadvertised the whole time. Now as soon as I run across it-it gets discontinued.

  25. #55

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    This thread should have been called "the Slow, Agonizing, Torturous Death of Jean Patou." P&G Beaute International doesn't even own Patou anymore. They sold it to "Designer Parfums" about a year ago. "Designer Parfums" owns WORTH. We might look for Joy at the drugstore going forward, in "Holiday Specials" with matching body cream for $39.99, and it will be worse than the P&G Beaute Int'l version, which is hard to fathom. Stock up on your vintage bottles of all Patou scents, preferably pre-1999, when they were still made in France. P&G closed the Patou factory in Levallois shortly after acquiring Patou and contracted everything out in the U.K., that's why the later P&G versions are marked "Made in England." We, of course, are here discussing arguably the finest compositions of the XXe Century. Nobody rivaled the standard of Patou in it's time: Not Caron, not Guerlain. This is a fairly undisputed fact in the Industry. One note of caution: It is best to always buy vintage Patou *SEALED IN BOX.* Patou refused to use most of the chemical preservatives pioneered by Guerlain, and so any Patou product will degrade quickly once exposed to air and light. The ergon layer will still be intact in a sealed-in-box bottle, and it will never have been exposed to light. Once you open a bottle, use it! It will not likely last more than a year.
    "...a Chacun son Mauvais Gout."

  26. #56

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Quote Originally Posted by le mouchoir de monsieur View Post
    This thread should have been called "the Slow, Agonizing, Torturous Death of Jean Patou." P&G Beaute International doesn't even own Patou anymore. They sold it to "Designer Parfums" about a year ago. "Designer Parfums" owns WORTH. We might look for Joy at the drugstore going forward, in "Holiday Specials" with matching body cream for $39.99, and it will be worse than the P&G Beaute Int'l version, which is hard to fathom. Stock up on your vintage bottles of all Patou scents, preferably pre-1999, when they were still made in France. P&G closed the Patou factory in Levallois shortly after acquiring Patou and contracted everything out in the U.K., that's why the later P&G versions are marked "Made in England." We, of course, are here discussing arguably the finest compositions of the XXe Century. Nobody rivaled the standard of Patou in it's time: Not Caron, not Guerlain. This is a fairly undisputed fact in the Industry. One note of caution: It is best to always buy vintage Patou *SEALED IN BOX.* Patou refused to use most of the chemical preservatives pioneered by Guerlain, and so any Patou product will degrade quickly once exposed to air and light. The ergon layer will still be intact in a sealed-in-box bottle, and it will never have been exposed to light. Once you open a bottle, use it! It will not likely last more than a year.
    Chilling news. Thank you for this information, I was wondering who it was who bought Patou.

  27. #57
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    What baffles me about 1000 is that it is from 1972, somehow it feels like it is much older. Why did 1000 die so young?

    Dans La Nuit Vers Le Jour Sans Adieu Je Reviens Vers Toi.


  28. #58
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Wouldn't it be great if someone thought it was worth while to keep producing it? I mean, they're getting over $200 a bottle here anyway.

  29. #59
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    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Quote Originally Posted by kumquat View Post
    Wouldn't it be great if someone thought it was worth while to keep producing it? I mean, they're getting over $200 a bottle here anyway.
    It would be great. There are probably 1000 restricted ingredients in the formula I bet.

    Dans La Nuit Vers Le Jour Sans Adieu Je Reviens Vers Toi.


  30. #60

    Default Re: The Death of Jean Patou 1000

    Quote Originally Posted by Fleurine View Post
    What baffles me about 1000 is that it is from 1972, somehow it feels like it is much older. Why did 1000 die so young?
    Jean Kerleo worked full time on the orchestration of 1000 for almost ten years. When the final comp was approved, it came to light that there was not enough natural Osmanthus being produced in China to guarantee fluency in fabrication, as 1000's primary innovation was the framing of this flower, a note previously unexplored in western perfumery, and never employed in this scale: This is why, from 1972 up until the mid 80's, each flacon of 1000 was hand registered and numbered. Patou was forced to purchase hectares of land in China, and to build a facility to distill the essence of this flower keeping up with the standard of quality that was its hallmark. The Osmanthus flower blooms and withers in one hour, once per year. The distillation process had to be conducted during this specific time slot, and, most importantly, enough "First Matter" had to be obtained. Creating 1000 was a daunting assignment. Patou had JOY, "The Perfume of the XXe Century" to contend with: 1000 had to live up to that singular legacy. Thus, a "parfum de fourrure" was created, as previously, there were none on the Patou menu. ("parfum de fourrure" = a perfume designed to scent fur. The house of Weil made a specialty of these, being a furrier) No expense was spared to create this landmark fragrance. As it panned out, not much money was ever made by Patou on sales of 1000. To the very end, (1999) only a certain quantity could be produced yearly, simply because the essences involved were so diverse, and so rare, and there were so many, that much toil and funds were required to obtain them. Here we have an example of what would never happen today: An house producing a fragrance that, from the get go, would not conceivably be profitable. Here we have one of the last examples of perfume as Art, not product. 1000 died so young because, as Cristobal Balenciaga memorably said upon announcing the shuttering of his house in 1968, "The World is No Longer Fit."
    Last edited by le mouchoir de monsieur; 22nd August 2012 at 02:11 AM.
    "...a Chacun son Mauvais Gout."

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