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  1. #1

    Default All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    So I picked up a copy of the March edition of GQ US at the airport to read on the plane (Justin Timberlake was on the cover), and there is an article by Chandler Burr with some wonderful illustrations. I've checked all over the GQ sites and can't find the article. (So I just typed it out, hopefully that's ok!?)

    Fact vs Fiction
    So what is cologne exactly?
    Well, not what you think. You and every other American male have been programmed by marketers to think cologne is for men and perfume is for women. Completely wrong. Don't freak out (seriously, don't freak out) but in the original French, the word for "fragrance" - for both sexes, is parfum; cologne is a very specific parfum, a light version that comes from the city of Koln (thus the name), based on citrus (lemon, grapefruit, bergamot).
    But obviously I should wear "men's" fragrances, right?
    Wrong again. Anyone who knows anything about scent (that's you now) knows that dividing fragrances in "masculines" and "feminines", as the industry does, is just a marketing device to give straight American guys psychological permission to wear them (which European and gay guys don't need). As Hermes perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena puts it "Scent is art. Is there a painting only for women? A symphony for men?" Authentic houses don't gender their highest-end scents: Tom Ford's Private Blend, the Hermessence collection, Chanel's Les Exclusifs, Armani Privé.

    Where and How to Apply
    1. The tops of your forearms - and skip your wrists.
    2. On either side of your neck.
    3. A shot inside your T-shirt and down your back.
    4. For God's sake, watch the volume. Hopefully, you're not playing your iPod so loudly passersby can hear it - you shouldn't be blasting your scent, either.

    Where to Store It
    Best: In the refrigerator. Constant and cool temperature, no light to damage the juice, as little oxygen exposure as possible.
    Worst: On a sunny windowsill or your bathroom, where the climate fluctuates with each shower.

    What to Look For
    If you haven't done a thorough recon of what's out there since high school - and you've never heard of perfume makers like Le Labo, Serge Lutens, Andy Tauer (he's Swiss) and Frederic Malle - you're starting at zero. They produce things with the three technical aspects you want: (1) persistence (it lasts more than thirty minutes on your skin) (2) performance (how well it diffuses when sprayed) and (3) structure (the raw materials fit well together). The fourth quality is your own: Do you love it? Do other people? The only way to know is to try several. Keep one on your right arm, one on your left, and pay attention to who notices.

    What to Avoid
    Steer clear of anything that reads "Dad," stamps an invisible date on you (1986, say), or suggest you want to start a harem. And don't worry about whether it smells like it's for a guy, or be seduced by "masculine" classifications like "woods," "citrus," and "spice." Focus on whether it smells good. Dior Homme is an iris for men and one of the best scents you can buy. The Different Company has an amazing, smoky, spicy rose, Rose Poivrée (unisex!), and applying Comme des Garcons 2 for women is like putting on a $2,000 pair of shoes.

    The Well-Groomed Man's Scent Wardrobe
    Your closet holds a mix of basics and standouts; your olfactory inventory should be equally diverse

    Vetiver Babylon Giorgio Armani
    Vetiver (and Indian grass) is green and lemony. It makes this unisex from Armani's Prive collection less ferocious than the 1959 men's-only version; subtle, clean, it's the navy suit of the group.
    Happy for Men Clinique
    This is like a basic blue oxford that turns out to be a cool twist on the traditional business shirt. it smells like citrus mixed with nitrous oxide - or mandarin oranges grown on Mars.
    Light Blue for Women Dolce & Gabbana
    That's right - in the "feminine" Light Blue, perfumer Olivier Cresp has created for D&G a perfect scent for guys (sorry, ladies). The combination: Sicilian lemon peel, green apple, and cedar.
    Tom Ford Extreme Tom Ford
    Here's a "men's" fragrance that's awesome on every level. It's recognizably male without being a cliche - no "soap" or "deodorant" smells - and perfectly spiced and as sleek as a Maserati.
    Un Jardin Sur le Nil Hermes
    A unisex, this stuff is as far evolved from Drakkar Noir as a Lexus hybrid is from a '63 Beetle: It smells of unripe mango-peel in a cool breeze under a tropical sky. Fragrance doesn't get better.

    C.B.
    Last edited by Gblue; 16th March 2009 at 07:06 AM.

  2. #2

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Good article, thanks. But Clinique Happy for men? Seriously?
    Last edited by dynastyd95; 15th March 2009 at 07:49 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    yea seriously clinque happy is like the worst choice
    he would of been better off recommending AdG
    I think his choices might have other agendas behind them
    Off-Site Decants =) (updated 05/16/12)
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  4. #4

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hasupk@gmail.com View Post
    yea seriously clinque happy is like the worst choice
    he would of been better off recommending AdG
    I think his choices might have other agendas behind them
    I agree. He obviously knows what he's talking about but his recommendations sound a little strange. I guess once you've sniffed most of what's in the industry you begin to question what you actually like!

    Oh btw, thanks Gblue, for taking the time to type this up. I enjoyed reading it.
    Last edited by L'Aventurier; 15th March 2009 at 08:42 PM.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I don't read GQ but...are any of the suggested fragrances advertised in that issue, the previous few issues or will they be advertised in near future issues? That would be too much of a coincidence, wouldn't it..
    Our job is to live joyfully in this world of sorrows--Joseph Campbell

  6. #6

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I don't agree about storing fragrance in the refrigerator. I used to do this, and noticed that when I sprayed it on, the scent exploded (figuratively, heh) when it met room temperature and my skin, and then died out faster than normal. I've found that the best storage is on the cool side of room temperature. Find a stable, coolish dark place in your digs, in a closed cabinet or drawer close to the floor. Never in the bathroom. It should be stored, in my experience anyway, just a tad cooler than the environment in which it will be worn. Avoid extremes.

  7. #7

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I'm not a fan of JC Ellena's work but I like the quote by Ellena
    ====
    As Hermes perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena puts it "Scent is art. Is there a painting only for women? A symphony for men?"
    ====
    I am paging Renato and other BNers who think scents are classifiable as either masculine or feminine to comment. :P
    ============
    Although re Jardin sur le Nil, I say it's a unisex perfume that can be hated equally by both sexes!

  8. #8

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    His advice makes for a good intro introduction to starting a serious reflection about perfume, but I do believe his recommendations are a bit hipsterish. An overpriced vetiver, the worst Hermes, and emblematic synthetic trash (Light Blue) that no one with any interest in perfume would want to touch with a ten foot pole? Happy is very nice, but there are greater citruses...

    He did mention good ones in the text: dior homme, Rose Poivrée.
    In order to be constructive here, I would have suggested (today):
    Givenchy Vetyver (true Navy suit Vetyver)
    Acqua di Parma Colonia (unisex citrus)
    dior homme (unisex floral gourmand)
    Mazzolari Lui (ultimo macho)
    Diesel Fuel for Life Men (decent modern fruity leisure synthetic)
    Last edited by the_good_life; 15th March 2009 at 10:09 PM.
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    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Gblue View Post
    I've checked all over the GQ sites and can't find the article. (So I just typed it out, hopefully that's ok!?)
    Actually, I don't think it is, technically (we're not supposed to do a verbatim on copyrighted material here at BN) but given that this article is not available as an online link, I'm hoping that Grant and Chandler will give us a pass. I blogged about this feature last night, and (erring on the safe side of copyright and blogger decorum) I held back on quoting what I thought was Burr's best stuff.

    Let's see what the powers that be say. Personally, I think it's a great feature, too, and I'm glad you posted it.

    I took Burr's selection as a handful of modern scents that would "fix" a highly dysfunctional wardrobe belonging to a GQ reader with an emergent but flawed, "legacy" taste in fragrance. That selection might not even be appropriate for a BNer with a highly evolved and specialized taste in frags. Bluesoul blogged another counterpoint article which I think shows how a BNer might choose their own "core" set of 5 frags. Mine is a bit different from bluesoul's. But I think the point is that every guy out there needs to have a selection of at least 5 frags, just as they need at least 5 sets of clothes. For that reason, I think Burr did a real service by gently pointing people in the direction of BNer taste - although perhaps not BNer taste itself.

    I agree with frug about frags in the fridge - one has to be careful. I generally refrigerate my vintage, bulk, low-usage, and precious stuff. The heavy-rotation stuff doesn't need it. The picture in the feature, showing the frags in the fridge door, emphasizes the point that light refrigeration (meaning cave cool) is probably ideal. Also, people quickly figure out that you can pull out a week's worth of frags from the fridge, and they generally warm up in minutes.

    Overall, I think this article does a service to the fragrance community. In a way, it's almost an advertisement for BN-level attention to fragrance.
    * * * *

  10. #10

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I am amazed he has picked Hermes Un Jardin Sur le Nil. I had the misfortune to sample this recently, and it really is one the blandest things I have tried in some time. The choices seem very off-beat, in a contrived sort of way.
    Last edited by Bartlebooth; 15th March 2009 at 10:59 PM. Reason: Typo

  11. #11
    AromiErotici
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Sorry folks, but when I want to know about a particular genre or need an opinion, I do not look to this person or anyone like him. He has his own agenda and it's not in keeping with mine.

    I come here for unadulterated information. It's more honest, less jaded and even if it "sounds" unprofessional, it still is sound advice.

    Refrigerate? Spare me man. I could do without condensation buildup in my juice. Cool and dark is good enough for me.

  12. #12

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I am extremely sceptical about magazine recommendations (I know how it works for music magazines for instance) and there always is commercial consideration or agenda involved, but I still bought GQ today after reading last night's blog.

  13. #13

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Same observation as most of you - everything was going swimmingly until I reached the recommendations. Then it was "Whoa, what the hell is THAT? Clinique Happy??" (sorry, CologneJunkie!)

    If I weren't already familiar with Burr's writing, and taste, I'd have thought it was a joke. Sorry, Chandler, from the hundreds of fragrances you could have picked to educate the hapless hordes of GQ readers, your selection left me puzzled, perplexed, and peeved.

    I second TGL's alternate recommendations, and would add:
    Acqua di Parma Colonia Assoluta
    Rive Gauche PH


    Hell, I'd recommend French Lover over most of Burr's recommendations. Head and shoulders above D&G or Clinique.
    Last edited by Snafoo; 15th March 2009 at 11:40 PM.
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  14. #14

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Intelligent discussion often requires more than a one word insult.

    And I don't know if it's allowed to be on here with copyright, but I appreciate the effort of typing it over. The choices were a surprise but it's also nice to see people recommend different fragrances all the time instead of the same old same old. Might be just me though
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.

  15. #15

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    I agree with frug about frags in the fridge...
    Dr. Seuss lives!

  16. #16
    AromiErotici
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Intelligent discussion often requires more than a one word insult.

    ??????????????

  17. #17

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    As a former chem student - remind me - how does putting perfume in the fridge build condensation inside the perfume that will be bad for the perfume?

    Most of the water condensations tend to form on the outside of the bottle. If they form on the inside, assuming even a perfectly airtight sealed bottle, that's because the evaporated water vapor content of the perfume inside the bottle evaporated and recondensed - which is nothing bad - because the condensed water vapor and other condensates come from inside the perfume bottle itself, so it's not "foreign matter".

    Plus, everyone knows lower temperature (in general, unless proven otherwise in highly specific cases) slows down chemical reactions which preserves perfume longer.

  18. #18
    AromiErotici
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    The condensation forms on the inside of the bottles I've refrigerated in the past. It doesn't matter to me that the water came from the parfum itself. I don't want it sprinkled on the inside of my fragrances bottles, nor do I want it separated from the original body of liquid.

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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Lets just remind ourselves that it's a bit over the top to be storing our fragrances in the fridge? If anything it suggests that the manufacturer produced it improperly, if its so fragile. I understand storing something 100$+ in the fridge like MI, because the natural notes really do tend to go fast, but who is sticking 60 dollar bottles of synthetics in the fridge? Whats the point? If you are dropping so much money on fragrances, fork up the extra thirty or forty bucks for a mini fridge, so you have room for some food in your real one. Or maybe thats the point, if you spend so much money on fragrances, you have no money for food, and thus a roomy fridge in which to store them?

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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by AromiErotici View Post
    Intelligent discussion often requires more than a one word insult.

    ??????????????
    There was a one-word, insult post. Lian deep-sixed it immediately. Thanks, Lian!
    * * * *

  21. #21
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by DerangedGoose View Post
    Lets just remind ourselves that it's a bit over the top to be storing our fragrances in the fridge? If anything it suggests that the manufacturer produced it improperly, if its so fragile. I understand storing something 100$+ in the fridge like MI, because the natural notes really do tend to go fast, but who is sticking 60 dollar bottles of synthetics in the fridge? Whats the point? If you are dropping so much money on fragrances, fork up the extra thirty or forty bucks for a mini fridge, so you have room for some food in your real one. Or maybe thats the point, if you spend so much money on fragrances, you have no money for food, and thus a roomy fridge in which to store them?
    I suspect most people would balk at a separate fridge for frags. I wouldn't buy one - I just happen to have an old one in the basement with lots of room.

    For the average GQ reader, I think a cool drawer is just fine. People generally don't get interested in refrigeration until they come on here. At that point, they start getting a fair number of bottles, and they realize they're not going to be finishing many of them within the next 5 years or so. The urge to preserve kicks in.

    Burr gave best and worst options for storage. If GQ would have given him more word-space, a middle option (cool drawer) would have been nice.
    * * * *

  22. #22
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by AromiErotici View Post
    The condensation forms on the inside of the bottles I've refrigerated in the past. It doesn't matter to me that the water came from the parfum itself. I don't want it sprinkled on the inside of my fragrances bottles, nor do I want it separated from the original body of liquid.
    Hmm..


    Absolute humidity ranges from 0 grams per cubic meter in dry air to 30 grams per cubic meter (0.03 ounce per cubic foot) when the vapor is saturated (100% humidity) at 30 °C/86 F

    A cubic foot has 1728 cubic inches.

    An 'average' raindrop is about 0.00416 ounce of water so a cubic foot of air at 30 C/86 F and 100% humidity would have approximately 8 average raindrops of water in it if all the water were condensed (leaving the cubic foot of air totally dry with 0% humidity).

    Now let's see what volume of air can possibly fit in a totally emptied 1 inch X 2.5 inch X 5 inch bottle of fragrance.

    I calculate it to be 12.5 cubic inches.and I round out the amount of water possible to condensate from that volume, were it at 100% humidity and 30 C/86 F and all air (bottle emptied) to be about 0.053 of an average raindrop of water or about 0.0002 ounce.

    Also, let's not forget when fragrance warms up and the air in the bottle warms up from the refrigerator temp toward room temp, the captive air once again becomes rapidly more humid by taking the condensation back into it toward the original equilibrium, with or without fragrance in the bottle.

    Significant enough addition of water from condensation of fragrance displaced and replaced by humid air (probably 100 ml/3.4 oz fragrance in that size bottle) to notice a difference in fragrance strength as you are using it?

    I personally don't see how it would be considering the miniscule amount of water involved.


    disclaimer: I am not a math whiz so feel free to check my math as I may be off somewhere here or there and I got tired of calculating and just estimated in a few places.
    Last edited by kbe; 16th March 2009 at 03:08 AM.
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by frug View Post
    Dr. Seuss lives!
    As far as what frug said of frags in the fridge,
    I thinked and I thanked and I thought I'd abridge,
    But a bee in my bonnet and a Burr in my sock
    Made me mirthful and merry myself then to mock.

    So I bought every Bond, every Bois, every Blanche,
    Every fabulous flanker and limited launch,
    'Till a fridge overflowing with fragrance I found,
    And methought that I might in their boxes be drowned.

    Then a dog in a Derby drove up in the drive,
    With a knapsack of niche that had missed Chandler's five.
    "We best be a-coolin' it off" he did say,
    And my inner neat-freak said that it was OK.

    So we artfully added the niche to the stack,
    By hammering bottles into every crack.
    Then we fired up the fridge and the freezer on full,
    And onto our cold paws did our mittens we pull.

    Seventy! Sixty! The temperature dropped
    As we fought to preserve all the flankers that flopped.
    Fifty-five! Forty-five! Downward by ten,
    And the derbified doggie's cold breath I saw then.

    "I've got an idea!" he said in a rhyme,
    "At absolute zero they'll last for all time!"
    So we hijacked a tanker of liquid N2.
    And we sprayed down our juice 'till the bottles turned blue.

    While the wetness of water was a worry, no doubt
    Condensation of oxygen carries more clout.
    If I ventured a guess at the cause of the boom,
    'Twas the LOX and the bagels that took out the room.

    I suppose there's no need now the next part to tell
    As I thumb through GQ in my cool prison cell,
    But perhaps you'll be wiser these words then to heed
    As you ponder the possible freezing of Creed.

    You can freeze all your frags or a fabulous few
    And the chem of the cooling is working for you,
    But the physics of freezing your frags is a flop.
    Don't let doggies in Derbies make you lose a drop.

    * * * *

  24. #24

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Inselaffe View Post
    I am amazed he has picked Hermes Un Jardin Sur le Nil.
    You shouldn't be. His latest book had this fragrance as a topic of interest Good book, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by maksidrom View Post
    I am extremely sceptical about magazine recommendations .
    You should be. Although I would like to think this ( article) is a step in the right direction.

  25. #25

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by frug View Post
    I don't agree about storing fragrance in the refrigerator. I used to do this, and noticed that when I sprayed it on, the scent exploded (figuratively, heh) when it met room temperature and my skin, and then died out faster than normal. I've found that the best storage is on the cool side of room temperature. Find a stable, coolish dark place in your digs, in a closed cabinet or drawer close to the floor. Never in the bathroom. It should be stored, in my experience anyway, just a tad cooler than the environment in which it will be worn. Avoid extremes.
    There is some logic to this phenomenon. Its called Le Chatlier's principle. It starts out cold and the rapid change and increase in temp would drive the reaction forward faster. Just an idea. In any case, I don't agree with storing fragrances in the fridge either for many other reasons. I also don't agree with many of the perfume choices he noted. All I read were opinions that anyone here is capable of generating. I guess I am expected more depth.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  26. #26

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    I took Burr's selection as a handful of modern scents that would "fix" a highly dysfunctional wardrobe belonging to a GQ reader with an emergent but flawed, "legacy" taste in fragrance...

    Also, people quickly figure out that you can pull out a week's worth of frags from the fridge, and they generally warm up in minutes.

    Overall, I think this article does a service to the fragrance community. In a way, it's almost an advertisement for BN-level attention to fragrance.
    Whoa, whoa, whoa!
    Hold it right there mister. How dare you... HOW DARE YOU? Make positive comments about an article written by Burr? You should know better. Whenever I hear his name I reach for my bucket full of rotten tomatoes and assorted vegetables. (Some say that manure is more efficient but I think he has a basic form of human decency)

    I mean, How could he possibly recommend something that I do not like?

    The nerve of that guy?! He should recommend Vintage, HTF stuff and SL perfumes because that is what the average reader of GQ likes. Or better yet, he should chose from my wardrobe.

    (Wait a second. Most of his recs. are actually in my wardrobe )
    Last edited by irish; 16th March 2009 at 04:54 AM.
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    Looking for lot of samples of female fragrances.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Aromi & Ken - I think what Aromi is seeing is simply phase separation of certain components in the chilled frags. Many of the components of a perfume are (molecularly speaking) mostly hydrocarbon with just a little bit of functionality - therefore highly non-polar, and of limited solubility in the ethanol. Drop the temperature and they start dropping out of solution. Keep cooling and some of them may actually freeze, and it will look like dirty ice. All of this is very disconcerting to most folks. The question is, does this affect the juice?

    For something like a skin product, the answer would be yes. These are emulsions, suspensions, and whatnot, and they're designed to function properly within a certain temperature range. Things which break the emulsions or cause precipitation and oiling out of components may lead to changes which don't reverse properly upon warming. You've probably seen creams and things like that, which went nasty from freezing.

    For fragrances, I doubt that there is much of a problem. The substances are designed to be a solution at room temperature, and if something oils out, it goes back into solution when it warms up. It's disconcerting to see components separate, but the physical change does not imply a chemical change. Just as a point of reference, I used to put many organic solutions in the refrigerator in the lab. There would frequently be some kind of oiling out or phase separation in these air-tight, bottled samples. Sometimes there would be freezing, precipitation, etc. I would warm them up to room temperature and they would return to their former state, without any apparent consequence - as verified by things like NMR analysis.

    The real bother for me with refrigeration is the possibility of losing a seal. That - in combination with condensation of ambient water vapor coming through the seal - could be nasty. If you've ever seen a sprayed decant become cloudy from water condensation during spraying (you will feel it getting cold during the spraying), then you know how little water it takes to cloud a perfume. That's why I don't take the temperature any lower than normal refrigeration. No freezing. I simply don't know how well the seals will hold when frozen. But I really think that there is no danger storing aromachemicals in the fridge - particularly if you're careful to avoid condensation during warm-up. There are multiple ways to avoid condensation (like plastic bags), and from what people report, they seem to work. I have a cool basement, so there is very little condensation when I let my vintage frags warm up there after removing them from the fridge. So I don't even bother with bags.

    I will say this. Refrigeration can make sensitive organics last for decades. Things that would normally disappear in a few months or years. So it will guarantee freshness, I have no doubt.
    * * * *

  28. #28

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Good overall advice; terrible recommendations.

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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Nice to see some sensible advice in GQ.

    Guys, don't get so hung up on Burr's recommendations. His tastes are subjective (just like yours are). I personally don't like Happy for Men either, but perhaps someone who doesn't know fragrances at all will try to sample HfM before they snatch up one of those awful Axe body sprays otherwise.

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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by mikeperez23 View Post
    Nice to see some sensible advice in GQ.

    Guys, don't get so hung up on Burr's recommendations. His tastes are subjective (just like yours are). I personally don't like Happy for Men either, but perhaps someone who doesn't know fragrances at all will try to sample HfM before they snatch up one of those awful Axe body sprays otherwise.
    Big agreement on the Axe thing. I know some very sharp guys who use that stuff - they simply don't know how much better it can be. And it wasn't even like Burr said these were the most of anything. Just a mixture of basics and standouts, as far as I can tell. Maybe he actually put in HfM as an example of a decent basic.
    * * * *

  31. #31

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I agree with the posters above that view the article as good advice overall and second the notion that we shouldn't get too hung-up on the specific recommendations.

    Big picture: The article is attempting to help the audience understand that the distinction between masculine and feminine is market driven. For the average Joe Sixpack that's quite a bit to digest.

  32. #32

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Excellent posts, Redneck! The Seuss satire was priceless, and your advice re: dissolution was pretty much spot on. I would definitely not recommend freezing fragrances for the reasons you gave, and will add one of my own: fragrance compounds with very low solubilities may be difficult to get back into solution. I don't know how many fragrance compounds fall into that category but it's not worth taking the chance, IMO. In our lab, we place bottles of precipitated solutions in an ultrasonic bath and zap them for a few minutes to get the precipitate to resolubilize.
    Last edited by Snafoo; 16th March 2009 at 04:59 AM.
    Everyone is entitled to his own opinions, but not his own facts. Daniel Moynihan

  33. #33
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Snafoo View Post
    Excellent posts, Redneck! The Seuss satire was priceless, and your advice re: dissolution was pretty much spot on. I would definitely not recommend freezing fragrances for the reasons you gave, and will add one of my own: fragrance compounds with very low solubilities may be difficult to get back into solution. I don't know how many fragrance compounds fall into that category but it's not worth taking the chance, IMO. In our lab, we place bottles of precipitated solutions in an ultrasonic bath and zap them for a few minutes to get the precipitate to resolubilize.
    Thanks, Snaf! And definitely one more excellent reason not to freeze. Normally I like to test things with experiment, but I really don't want to freeze my frags and then see which ones have trouble redissolving! Personally, I just don't think the extra few degrees would be worth it.

    And I just thought of something else - changed concentrations. As some components freeze out, others become concentrated in the liquid. It's not inconceivable that this might change the available chemistry - say of some minor components that are more stable when dilute, or which might react more readily when almost neat, or in the solid state.

    Best to let sleeping dogs lie!
    * * * *

  34. #34

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    As far as what frug said of frags in the fridge,
    I thinked and I thanked and I thought I'd abridge,
    But a bee in my bonnet and a Burr in my sock
    Made me mirthful and merry myself then to mock.

    So I bought every Bond, every Bois, every Blanche,
    Every fabulous flanker and limited launch,
    'Till a fridge overflowing with fragrance I found,
    And methought that I might in their boxes be drowned.

    Then a dog in a Derby drove up in the drive,
    With a knapsack of niche that had missed Chandler's five.
    "We best be a-coolin' it off" he did say,
    And my inner neat-freak said that it was OK.

    So we artfully added the niche to the stack,
    By hammering bottles into every crack.
    Then we fired up the fridge and the freezer on full,
    And onto our cold paws did our mittens we pull.

    Seventy! Sixty! The temperature dropped
    As we fought to preserve all the flankers that flopped.
    Fifty-five! Forty-five! Downward by ten,
    And the derbified doggie's cold breath I saw then.

    "I've got an idea!" he said in a rhyme,
    "At absolute zero they'll last for all time!"
    So we hijacked a tanker of liquid N2.
    And we sprayed down our juice 'till the bottles turned blue.

    While the wetness of water was a worry, no doubt
    Condensation of oxygen carries more clout.
    If I ventured a guess at the cause of the boom,
    'Twas the LOX and the bagels that took out the room.

    I suppose there's no need now the next part to tell
    As I thumb through GQ in my cool prison cell,
    But perhaps you'll be wiser these words then to heed
    As you ponder the possible freezing of Creed.

    You can freeze all your frags or a fabulous few
    And the chem of the cooling is working for you,
    But the physics of freezing your frags is a flop.
    Don't let doggies in Derbies make you lose a drop.

    We do need a basenotes yearbook collecting the best contributions (I'm sure Oxford University Press will be interested) and this needs to be in there
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  35. #35

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    Actually, I don't think it is, technically (we're not supposed to do a verbatim on copyrighted material here at BN) but given that this article is not available as an online link, I'm hoping that Grant and Chandler will give us a pass. I blogged about this feature last night, and (erring on the safe side of copyright and blogger decorum) I held back on quoting what I thought was Burr's best stuff.

    Let's see what the powers that be say. Personally, I think it's a great feature, too, and I'm glad you posted it.
    Quote Originally Posted by Lian View Post
    And I don't know if it's allowed to be on here with copyright, but I appreciate the effort of typing it over.
    Hoping it's ok then. At least it's sparked some discussion If it's not ok to have posted it, then I apologise.

    My 2c - The fragrances he recommends are interesting to me. I love Dior Homme and CdG2. I used to wear Happy all the time - great for everyday, and I think that's the point of the recommendation. I wouldn't wear Light Blue for Women (because I can't bear the people I've associated it with), but it's interesting to see "women's" fragrances being blatantly recommended to guys. I just wish there was something like this article in the UK press!

  36. #36

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Thanks for the article.. might be usefull for my blog. Though, not really that new to me.
    unico grande amore.

  37. #37

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    As far as what frug said of frags in the fridge,
    I thinked and I thanked and I thought I'd abridge,
    But a bee in my bonnet and a Burr in my sock
    Made me mirthful and merry myself then to mock.

    So I bought every Bond, every Bois, every Blanche,
    Every fabulous flanker and limited launch,
    'Till a fridge overflowing with fragrance I found,
    And methought that I might in their boxes be drowned.

    Then a dog in a Derby drove up in the drive,
    With a knapsack of niche that had missed Chandler's five.
    "We best be a-coolin' it off" he did say,
    And my inner neat-freak said that it was OK.

    So we artfully added the niche to the stack,
    By hammering bottles into every crack.
    Then we fired up the fridge and the freezer on full,
    And onto our cold paws did our mittens we pull.

    Seventy! Sixty! The temperature dropped
    As we fought to preserve all the flankers that flopped.
    Fifty-five! Forty-five! Downward by ten,
    And the derbified doggie's cold breath I saw then.

    "I've got an idea!" he said in a rhyme,
    "At absolute zero they'll last for all time!"
    So we hijacked a tanker of liquid N2.
    And we sprayed down our juice 'till the bottles turned blue.

    While the wetness of water was a worry, no doubt
    Condensation of oxygen carries more clout.
    If I ventured a guess at the cause of the boom,
    'Twas the LOX and the bagels that took out the room.

    I suppose there's no need now the next part to tell
    As I thumb through GQ in my cool prison cell,
    But perhaps you'll be wiser these words then to heed
    As you ponder the possible freezing of Creed.

    You can freeze all your frags or a fabulous few
    And the chem of the cooling is working for you,
    But the physics of freezing your frags is a flop.
    Don't let doggies in Derbies make you lose a drop.


    Belly shaking, tears rolling down my face! I could even see the Seussesqe creatures madly at work. And a physics lesson to boot.

    Kudos for "Blanche/launch"

    "So we artfully added the niche to the stack,
    By hammering bottles into every crack."

    "If I ventured a guess at the cause of the boom,
    'Twas the LOX and the bagels that took out the room."

    LOL

  38. #38

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Truly inspired!
    BRAVO!!!!!!!!!!

    :toppie::toppie::toppie:

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    As far as what frug said of frags in the fridge,
    I thinked and I thanked and I thought I'd abridge,
    But a bee in my bonnet and a Burr in my sock
    Made me mirthful and merry myself then to mock.

    So I bought every Bond, every Bois, every Blanche,
    Every fabulous flanker and limited launch,
    'Till a fridge overflowing with fragrance I found,
    And methought that I might in their boxes be drowned.

    Then a dog in a Derby drove up in the drive,
    With a knapsack of niche that had missed Chandler's five.
    "We best be a-coolin' it off" he did say,
    And my inner neat-freak said that it was OK.

    So we artfully added the niche to the stack,
    By hammering bottles into every crack.
    Then we fired up the fridge and the freezer on full,
    And onto our cold paws did our mittens we pull.

    Seventy! Sixty! The temperature dropped
    As we fought to preserve all the flankers that flopped.
    Fifty-five! Forty-five! Downward by ten,
    And the derbified doggie's cold breath I saw then.

    "I've got an idea!" he said in a rhyme,
    "At absolute zero they'll last for all time!"
    So we hijacked a tanker of liquid N2.
    And we sprayed down our juice 'till the bottles turned blue.

    While the wetness of water was a worry, no doubt
    Condensation of oxygen carries more clout.
    If I ventured a guess at the cause of the boom,
    'Twas the LOX and the bagels that took out the room.

    I suppose there's no need now the next part to tell
    As I thumb through GQ in my cool prison cell,
    But perhaps you'll be wiser these words then to heed
    As you ponder the possible freezing of Creed.

    You can freeze all your frags or a fabulous few
    And the chem of the cooling is working for you,
    But the physics of freezing your frags is a flop.
    Don't let doggies in Derbies make you lose a drop.


  39. #39

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Great work RP, good laugh studying for this exam :-p

    But anyway, deep down guy (if not on the surface), you know Burr is likely receiving some kickback for mentioning their frags in an article found in GQ. Come onnnnnn.

  40. #40

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    "You and every other American male have been programmed by marketers to think cologne is for men and perfume is for women."
    I guess US Basenoters are best placed to comment -
    -Were you brainwashed?
    -If so, at what stage in the process were you broken?
    -Did you go home, throw your perfume bottles out, and denounce all your buddies who still held on to theirs?
    -After the brainwashing process, what did you make of all those European EDT scents being sold - which plainly weren't labelled as either perfume or cologne?


    "Anyone who knows anything about scent (that's you now) knows that dividing fragrances in "masculines" and "feminines", as the industry does, is just a marketing device to give straight American guys psychological permission to wear them (which European and gay guys don't need)."
    - Are you US guys cringeing from an inferiority complex yet? Now that you've been told that you're not as sophisticated as your wordly European peers?
    - And did anyone tell the guys in Europe about this? My experience is only limited to six European countries, but when I was over there, I mainly saw males testing out male scents in the male fragrance section.


    "Authentic houses don't gender their highest-end scents: Tom Ford's Private Blend, the Hermessence collection, Chanel's Les Exclusifs, Armani Privé."
    Which means that houses that do gender their highest-end scents, like say Dior and Chanel, just aren't authentic - correct?


    "Steer clear of anything that reads "Dad," stamps an invisible date on you (1986, say), or suggest you want to start a harem."
    and
    "Tom Ford Extreme Tom Ford
    Here's a "men's" fragrance that's awesome on every level. It's recognizably male without being a cliche
    "
    Curiouser and curiouser.

    After railing at the notion that there is any masculine and feminine difference between scents, and telling you that you are brainwashed for thinking so (i.e. you must have a weak and feeble mind), well - the writer goes on to describe a whole bunch of scents as being masculine, and that all but the most expensive one should be avoided (i.e. throw out your Paco Rabanne and Aramis everybody).

    And what scents suggest that you want to start a harem? Some of the supposedly non existent "masculine" ones perhaps?
    And what does the writer have against harems anyway - is he anti-islamic? Or anti-something else?

    In my opinion, the writer seems grossly inconsistent and contradictory. I rate the article very poorly.
    Renato
    Last edited by Renato; 16th March 2009 at 02:28 PM.

  41. #41

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Thanks for posting!

    Hopefully enough people read it to tear down the blinding barrier that is the masculin/feminine dicotomy that is made up by marketing departments of corporate America.

    Also, I hope the article opened some eyes to the niche houses out there. I'd like to smell more people wearing something other than designer scents!

  42. #42
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    The storage question has been done to death many times here in BN. See here and here, for example.

    I keep my fragrances in the refrigerator in their original box (if possible), and that box is kept in an individually sealed freezer bag. Fragrances which have removable atomizers are stored with the original screw top, if available. When I want to wear the fragrance, I remove the freezer bag from the refrigerator and allow the fragrance to come up to room temperature over a few hours. This prevents water condensation within the bottle if it were sprayed while the contents were cold, since the air passing through the atomizer to replace the fragrance during a spray would be room temperature, and therefore carrying too much water vapor for the temperature within the interior of the bottle.

    I decant enough to wear for a week, and then place the rest back in the refrigerator in the freezer bag. Refrigeration of the bottle reduces the vapor pressure of the component oils and also reduces the rate of oxidation, as does shielding the bottle from light. I use the freezer bags in order to keep any top notes escaping through the atomizer top in some semblance of equilibrium with the air around the bottle. A better solution would use something like a Mason jar or even Parafilm around the bottle top (which is the standard laboratory technique often used for environmentally isolating samples).

    The idea that frequent temperature changes, in and of themselves, damage a fragrance is simply wrong. The time scale over which chemical reactions occur is much faster than the time scale over which a bottle warms up and cools down. As far as temperature goes, the only things that matter from the standpoint of chemical reactivity are (1) what is the temperature of the liquid, and (2) how long was the liquid at that temperature. These two factors govern how far chemical degradation is able to proceed.

    Snafoo is correct that freezing can cause some higher-molecular weight oils to congeal and not want to go back into solution. Fragrances sensitive to this can be determined on a case-by-case basis. Empirically, I have not found mere refrigeration to cause this problem very often.

    My own technique of storage would be overkill for anyone who plans on depleting their bottle within a couple of years or so. My collection is large enough that I want the bottles to last for several years. Those of you who disagree with the idea that refrigeration helps preserve fragrances are welcome to try to convince myself and the rest of the scientific world that the Arrhenius Equation is wrong. Good luck with that.
    Last edited by Astaroth; 16th March 2009 at 05:48 PM.

  43. #43

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Thanks for the scientific input Astaroth. For me the worry is always how much light will affect my perfume and on what timescale. My fragrances are now placed in a shadowy corner of the room. There is no direct sunlight on it ever, nor is the room itself very bright. It's not pitch black either but dim I guess. I plan to use my perfumes within a few years. I might start to box some away depending on the seasons maybe.
    But once you get locked into a serious perfume collection, the tendency is to push it as far as you can.

  44. #44
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Lian View Post
    Thanks for the scientific input Astaroth. For me the worry is always how much light will affect my perfume and on what timescale. My fragrances are now placed in a shadowy corner of the room. There is no direct sunlight on it ever, nor is the room itself very bright. It's not pitch black either but dim I guess. I plan to use my perfumes within a few years. I might start to box some away depending on the seasons maybe.
    Light has the effect of both heating the fragrance and causing excited electronic states in the component molecules. As an example, many of the oil molecules in fragrances have carbon-carbon double bonds which can absorb light and create free radicals. These can cause the molecules to either oxidize or bond together chemically (polymerize), slowly ruining the fragrance. My own opinion is that fragrances should be kept in opaque containers, but you'll have to balance this against being able to see the beauty of the bottle.

  45. #45

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by GourmandHomme View Post
    I'm not a fan of JC Ellena's work but I like the quote by Ellena
    ====
    As Hermes perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena puts it "Scent is art. Is there a painting only for women? A symphony for men?"
    ====
    I am paging Renato and other BNers who think scents are classifiable as either masculine or feminine to comment. :P
    ============
    Although re Jardin sur le Nil, I say it's a unisex perfume that can be hated equally by both sexes!
    Clothes (fashion) can be an art too....there are clothes designed just for men....and clothes designed just for women in mind.......even men's jeans are quite different than women's jeans.....

    But I'm sure you wear women's clothes, right? You are not a victim of marketing, are you?

  46. #46

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Just a note as a ChemE. I'm not sure what's condensing inside your bottles, but simply assuming it's water is terribly stupid. You'd need to know where the dew point is on the P/T diagram for that specific substance, and seeing as they're all dissolved together it's terribly hard to see how it'll interact. If anything it's probably alcohol condensing from the gas phase.

  47. #47

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    the worst Hermes, and emblematic synthetic trash (Light Blue)
    it was for making example that MEN can wear WOMEN frags
    i didnt take it as example to follow :P
    Tell Hugo, he isnt boss anymore.
    Nieruchomości Gorzów

  48. #48

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    ...And what scents suggest that you want to start a harem? Some of the supposedly non existent "masculine" ones perhaps? And what does the writer have against harems anyway - is he anti-islamic? Or anti-something else?

    In my opinion, the writer seems grossly inconsistent and contradictory. I rate the article very poorly.
    Renato
    I share your summary, but I am not surprised. Inconsistencies and contradictory statements already turned 'The Perfect Scent' into fragments and clips from the fashion world. If I had more time, I would like to add a couple of question marks to the continued reference to colognes as objet's d'art. High aspirations...but 'Happy for Men' as an example?
    Last edited by narcus; 16th March 2009 at 11:13 PM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  49. #49

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Re refrigeration, I store my main bottles of perfumes in the fridge. However, I also decant about 20 ml of my regular rotation perfumes into 50 ml glass spray bottles. They are kept in the cold/dark drawer in the bathroom and these are the bottles that get regularly used and then replenished when empty.

  50. #50

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Don't take it so seriously Renato, he's just trying to open the broad male population that reads GQ to try some perfumes, even though they're not labeled masculine. Chillllll.

  51. #51

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    So, what exactly is Burr's crime? Bad taste, or getting paid for his opinions?

  52. #52

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by andylama View Post
    So, what exactly is Burr's crime? Bad taste, or getting paid for his opinions?
    It certainly cannot be the latter.

  53. #53

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Mindbrain View Post
    Clothes (fashion) can be an art too....there are clothes designed just for men....and clothes designed just for women in mind.......even men's jeans are quite different than women's jeans.....

    But I'm sure you wear women's clothes, right? You are not a victim of marketing, are you?
    How about guys wearing skinny jeans? Or women wearing blazers (inspired obviously by Chanel suits). Note: I don't wear skinny jeans because I know straight-legs work best on me.

    The reason I don't wear a women's Chanel suit and what I wear (slim fit, spread collar tailored shirt, and slim-fit tailored English-style suits) is because they look great by showing off my body in its best light and silhouette. Not too many women have a slim frame and broad shoulders (and I'm not a bodybuilder)!

    One time, I laughed at myself because I was looking at a dress shirt because the way it was cut was how I imagine one of my dress shirts should be - except that 1) the sleeves were too short (critical flaw). 2) The fact that it was a woman's dress shirt did not even cross my mind at first.

    With perfumes, it's about smelling good. With clothes, it's all about fit, fit, fit!

  54. #54
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by albumleaf View Post
    Just a note as a ChemE. I'm not sure what's condensing inside your bottles, but simply assuming it's water is terribly stupid. You'd need to know where the dew point is on the P/T diagram for that specific substance, and seeing as they're all dissolved together it's terribly hard to see how it'll interact. If anything it's probably alcohol condensing from the gas phase.
    I was tacitly assuming the condensation described by AromiErotici came from whatever was replacing the fragrance within the cold atomizer during spraying, and that this is what he was concerned about. The liquid coming out through the top of the atomizer will just have nearly the same composition as the rest of the cold fragrance. It's very unlikely that there is alcohol condensing within the cold bottle after a spray, since prior to the spray the alcohol in the gas phase was in equilibrium with the alcohol in the liquid phase. After the spray, air entering the atomizer has reduced the concentration of alcohol in the gaseous phase. By Raoult's Law, more alcohol will then leave solution and go into the gaseous phase until equilibrium is achieved again. The same argument can be applied to the other fragrance components.

    And if you're seeing condensation on the outside of the cold bottle from the air touching it, that same air entering the bottle after a spray will be condensing water into the fragrance solution as well, since the air is obviously supersaturated at that low temperature. As a quick example, it is currently 75°F here in West Los Angeles (a desert climate, incidentally), with a relative humidity of 33%. That means the air is holding 7.17 gm/m^3 of water vapor. But refrigerated air at 41°F can hold only 6.8 gm/m^3 of water vapor. So it's likely the only thing condensing in the cold bottle after spraying is water. I seriously doubt that the fact that ethanol and water form an azeotrope, or that there are other intermolecular bonding relationships in the bottle, is causing a sufficiently strong deviation from Raoult's Law that water is prevented from condensing.

    In any case, it's best to allow the bottle to come up to room temperature prior to spraying, although I'm not entirely sure it will make much of a difference. There will always be some water in the fragrance anyway.
    Last edited by Astaroth; 17th March 2009 at 08:47 PM.

  55. #55

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    Don't take it so seriously Renato, he's just trying to open the broad male population that reads GQ to try some perfumes, even though they're not labeled masculine. Chillllll.
    We're both relatively new here on BN but I note there are some BNers here who believe fragrances are like the start of American junior high (7th grade) dances: all the boys sit on one side of the room and the girls in another, and that they're not supposed to meet each other halfway.

    There is another BNer in this thread whom I have crossed swords in the past about the feminine vs masculine perfume debate. You know who you are.

  56. #56

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I don't wear fragrances sold for women typically because I don't like how they smell on me, not because of some stigma I have against them.

    For example, everything I like about Light Blue, I can get from Cool Water in something that just smells better to me.

  57. #57
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Astaroth View Post
    I'm hoping we don't push far enough into this to start talking about azeotropic mixtures.
    Leave azeotropes out of this! Just because some molecules want to wear other molecules, it doesn't mean we should. Or something like that.
    * * * *

  58. #58

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    Don't take it so seriously Renato, he's just trying to open the broad male population that reads GQ to try some perfumes, even though they're not labeled masculine. Chillllll.
    If that was all he said, I wouldn't have rated his article so poorly.
    But that wasn't what he said.

    I'd summarise it as follows,

    1. There are no masculine and feminine scents.
    2. But if you do wear scents have some style, don't be unsophisticated like you are now, and make sure you stick to using either the unisex ones,
    or the more masculine unisex ones (Happy), or feminine scents and or the more feminine unisex ones.
    3. DO NOT wear very masculine scents (even though they don't exist), but if you really must, make sure you stick to the more expensive
    high end ones (Tom Ford Extreme).

    I recollect seeing pretty near the same content in other magazine articles posted here in the past, which were usually written by female writers.

    I don't read the Female Fragrance Discussion board much, but I wonder if they ever find and post the equivalent articles? That is, telling them to
    avoid the really feminine scents and to start using unisex or male scents, if they don't want to be unsophisticated.

    Renato
    Last edited by Renato; 17th March 2009 at 06:56 AM.

  59. #59

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    I share your summary, but I am not surprised. Inconsistencies and contradictory statements already turned 'The Perfect Scent' into fragments and clips from the fashion world. If I had more time, I would like to add a couple of question marks to the continued reference to colognes as objet's d'art. High aspirations...but 'Happy for Men' as an example?
    I'm glad I'm not the only one to spot the inconsistencies in the article.
    Cheers,
    Renato

  60. #60

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I think you need to lighten up, Renato. This is no scientific article nor does it have any aspirations of winning the Pulitzer prize. It's targeted at GQ readers that want a bit of quick info and I for one believe that this article might just help educate them a bit on fragrance.
    Looking to swap/buy/receive for free () the following samples/decants:
    Indult Tihota & Rêve en Cuir
    Chant d'Aromes extrait
    Vetiver pour Elle (5ml decant)


    Selling/swapping:
    Versace The Dreamer 50ml (1.7oz) BNIB
    ---

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    http://polderposh.blogspot.com/

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