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  1. #61

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Merlino View Post
    I think you need to lighten up, Renato. This is no scientific article nor does it have any aspirations of winning the Pulitzer prize. It's targeted at GQ readers that want a bit of quick info and I for one believe that this article might just help educate them a bit on fragrance.
    While this is true, it's not a good excuse for regurgitating stupid and untrue clichés about Americans and Europeans or Vance Packard conspiracies about programming consumers (or recommending crappy perfumes, for that matter ). The construction of gender goes deeper than Madison Avenue, and not all Europeans are metrosexual homophiles. There's plenty of rednecks in Germany (it's only that they don't control a major political party ). Of couse Burr knows all this and he's being a bit tongue-in-cheek, but I'm not sure whether the casual irony is appreciated by the target group.
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  2. #62

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    It's probably worth recalling what Chandler Burr's personal fragrance preferences have been in 2005-2006. They are marked by a 'hatred' of woody and citrussy 'hairy-chested' masculines and a tendency for brighter feminines. At that time this has been discussed in various threads, and I was worried how a man with such personal limitations could possibly be 'the' perfume critic for a huge American market. Four years later he is still there, and so are his limitations. Quite a number of Basenoters have grown from novice to almost experts during shorter time spans. Burr mainly added artsy embroidery and vague analogies to commercial products. What smells like Warhol and Roth, or of ashtray and fecal to Burr, is often just another fragrant product on the market, forgotten tomorrow. What else is there? Scented Dinners!

    1. - Angel by Thierry Mugler
    2. & 3. - Bigarade created by the perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena
    and En Passant (Malle)
    4. - Vera Wang by Vera Wang
    5. - Quartz by Molyneux
    6. - Hanae Mori for Men
    7. - Paris by Yves Saint Laurent
    8. - The Dreamer by Versace
    9. - Coco Mademoiselle by Chanel
    10. - Happy for Men by Clinique
    11. - Chanel No 5 by Chanel (I will admit that I don't wear it; it's the only feminine fragrance I don't wear, and only because it is just too well known. But sometimes I sneak some on a forearm. C.B. )

    If you care to read the details, probably written in 2006

    http://nowsmellthis.blogharbor.com/b...1/1013012.html

    Burr is a master in describing people, atmosphere and situations, as in the Nile Article on Hermes and Ellena, and again in the 'Perfect Scent' or the The Emperor of Scent. Another Biography, like Armani's or Tom Ford' s could even be a financial success, and I might enjoy reading those myself, if he could keep a distance to the persons portrayed.


    Last edited by narcus; 17th March 2009 at 11:32 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  3. #63

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    While this is true, it's not a good excuse for regurgitating stupid and untrue clichés about Americans and Europeans or Vance Packard conspiracies about programming consumers (or recommending crappy perfumes, for that matter ). The construction of gender goes deeper than Madison Avenue, and not all Europeans are metrosexual homophiles. There's plenty of rednecks in Germany (it's only that they don't control a major political party ). Of couse Burr knows all this and he's being a bit tongue-in-cheek, but I'm not sure whether the casual irony is appreciated by the target group.
    I tend to judge what's going on in a place by shelf space. If a scents get shelf space they must be selling. When I was in Berlin nearly two years ago, I formed my judgement based on what I saw at Ka Da We (or some such) and all the other perfume stores (mainly Douglas) I wandered into along that never ending street with the name I couldn't pronounce.

    What did I observe? Lots of scents I hadn't seen in Australia but had only ever heard about, like all the Aramis's (Original, JHL, 900, Devin) and Davidoff Zino. I formed the opinion that German men must like their scents more masculine than Australian men, and we're no slouches in that respect down here (except for our strange love of Joop Homme).
    Regards,
    Renato

  4. #64

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    It's probably worth recalling what Chandler Burr's personal fragrance preferences have been in 2005-2006. They are marked by a 'hatred' of woody and citrussy 'hairy-chested' masculines and a tendency for brighter feminines. At that time this has been discussed in various threads, and I was worried how a man with such personal limitations could possibly be 'the' perfume critic for a huge American market. Four years later he is still there, and so are his limitations. Quite a number of Basenoters have grown from novice to almost experts during shorter time spans. Burr mainly added artsy embroidery and vague analogies to commercial products. What smells like Warhol and Roth, or of ashtray and fecal to Burr, is often just another fragrant product on the market, forgotten tomorrow. What else is there? Scented Dinners!

    1. - Angel by Thierry Mugler
    2. & 3. - Bigarade created by the perfumer Jean-Claude Ellena
    and En Passant (Malle)
    4. - Vera Wang by Vera Wang
    5. - Quartz by Molyneux
    6. - Hanae Mori for Men
    7. - Paris by Yves Saint Laurent
    8. - The Dreamer by Versace
    9. - Coco Mademoiselle by Chanel
    10. - Happy for Men by Clinique
    11. - Chanel No 5 by Chanel (I will admit that I don't wear it; it's the only feminine fragrance I don't wear, and only because it is just too well known. But sometimes I sneak some on a forearm. C.B. )

    [/FONT][/FONT]
    That's extremely interesting.

    Could one perhaps speculate that the writer, despite his high profile, has apparently had next to zero effect on the scent buying habits of typical American males?

    And is likely to continue in that vein, given his selection in the current article?

    And does he advocate shaving one's chest?
    Renato
    Last edited by Renato; 17th March 2009 at 12:34 PM.

  5. #65

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Renato, please chill out and lighten up.
    --Chris
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  6. #66

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Hey, I wanna start a harem, wich fragrance should I use?

  7. #67

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    New Haarem by Bond No. 9

    Quote Originally Posted by rafaellg View Post
    Hey, I wanna start a harem, wich fragrance should I use?

  8. #68

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    While this is true, it's not a good excuse for regurgitating stupid and untrue clichés about Americans and Europeans or Vance Packard conspiracies about programming consumers (or recommending crappy perfumes, for that matter ). The construction of gender goes deeper than Madison Avenue, and not all Europeans are metrosexual homophiles. There's plenty of rednecks in Germany (it's only that they don't control a major political party ). Of couse Burr knows all this and he's being a bit tongue-in-cheek, but I'm not sure whether the casual irony is appreciated by the target group.
    I think you and Renato misread that particular passage. I believe Burr meant that some Americans need 'permission' to wear fragrance at all, and not to wear certain fragrances marketed towards women. I've read more than once here on Basenotes that some Americans (especially in a working environment IIRC) regard the wearing of fragrances by men as strange or, dare I say, effeminate. I have personally yet to come across any European that believed the very notion of men wearing fragrances was strange. So in that respect, and you may consider this a cliché, I believe Burr is right.
    Looking to swap/buy/receive for free () the following samples/decants:
    Indult Tihota & Rêve en Cuir
    Chant d'Aromes extrait
    Vetiver pour Elle (5ml decant)


    Selling/swapping:
    Versace The Dreamer 50ml (1.7oz) BNIB
    ---

    "The Sunshine bores the daylights outta me!"
    http://polderposh.blogspot.com/

  9. #69

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    ...And does he advocate shaving one's chest?
    Renato
    Never even thought about it - good question ! I don't think you need to lighten up further, Renato!
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  10. #70

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    ugh i don't want the masses who read GQ to learn about SL and other niches. i like to think i smell somewhat unique from all the other guys. last thing i want is every other guy wearing Chergui or Numero Uno

  11. #71

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by union1411 View Post
    ugh i don't want the masses who read GQ to learn about SL and other niches. i like to think i smell somewhat unique from all the other guys. last thing i want is every other guy wearing Chergui or Numero Uno
    You shouldn't overly concern yourself, if the recommendations in the article are anything to go by, the readers of GQ magazine won't be smelling that great in the near future

  12. #72
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    Leave azeotropes out of this! Just because some molecules want to wear other molecules, it doesn't mean we should. Or something like that.
    I just broke my own rule. I edited my reply and mentioned them.

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    There's plenty of rednecks in Germany (it's only that they don't control a major political party ). Of course Burr knows all this and he's being a bit tongue-in-cheek, but I'm not sure whether the casual irony is appreciated by the target group.
    I'm going to guess all that irony sailed blissfully unimpeded over the average reader's head. I'm not understanding all the defensiveness over this article. It was just a quick blurb to grab readers' eyes. It did that, so it worked.
    Last edited by Astaroth; 17th March 2009 at 06:31 PM.

  13. #73

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I read GQ, but it's a mixed experience from month to month. I read it mainly to keep up on clothes, and I enjoy the photo spreads. Some of the features are entertaining, a pretty good read now and again; some of the food articles are OK. This month's primer on breakfast, and survey of where the good ones are, was fun. Must try that poached egg on a sausage patty showered with slender deep-fried onion rings. There's a sober and poignant behind-the-scenes piece on Arlington National Cemetery worth reading.

    But the writing can be insufferably arch and trendy. GQ's habit of trying to palm off a snarky authority on contemporary culture can be annoying.

    Whether I agreed with everything in Burr's article (and I came away thinking it was a bit compromised) the piece fit the GQ style and had the typical graphically driven layout of one of the magazine's "Manual" features, though the mag didn't give it much play. Snappy, to the point, helpful, varied, you could get through it while sitting on the can.

    Justin Timberlake looks really good in a Dolce & Gabbana three-piece suit. The March issue has samples of Burberry The Beat, DKNY Men, and D & G The One.
    Last edited by frug; 18th March 2009 at 12:02 AM.

  14. #74

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Upon further reflection, I realised that I left out something near and dear in my earlier analysis of the article. So, for the sake of being comprehensive -

    "Steer clear of anything that reads "Dad," stamps an invisible date on you (1986, say),"

    Why, this is nothing more than a rephrasing one of our favourite topics here, namely when some newbie posts about
    "Old Man's Scents"

    Usually, that is met with numerous responses about not being silly, that there is no such a thing as an Old Man's Scent, that scents stand on their own, that they're classic works of art, etc etc etc.

    How come the deafening silence here, when the same thing is said by an "authority"?
    Were the newbies right after all?

    Renato

    P.S. - I note from Narcus's list above, that the writer doesn't apply this same criterion to scents that could just as easily be labelled as "Old Women's Scents".
    I wonder why that is?
    Last edited by Renato; 17th March 2009 at 11:08 PM.

  15. #75

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    I personally agree with Burr on this. He's writing this article for the readers of GQ, who read the magazine for opinions on how to be appealing to women. Women are not attracted to things that smell like their fathers, which many of the scents loved on Basenotes do. I'm not neccesarily knocking your frags, as I agree they are pieces of art, masterpieces, whathaveyou, but if your average woman of generally attractive age associates that frag with her father, it's not going to be as appealing to her.

  16. #76

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    ...but if your average woman of generally attractive age associates that frag with her father, it's not going to be as appealing to her.
    I'm not so sure about that.

  17. #77

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    I personally agree with Burr on this. He's writing this article for the readers of GQ, who read the magazine for opinions on how to be appealing to women. Women are not attracted to things that smell like their fathers, which many of the scents loved on Basenotes do. I'm not neccesarily knocking your frags, as I agree they are pieces of art, masterpieces, whathaveyou, but if your average woman of generally attractive age associates that frag with her father, it's not going to be as appealing to her.
    A woman may very well be attracted to a man that exhibits the qualities that her father possessed. Any man wearing a fragrance that reminded her of this enormous influence on her life, may seem very attractive indeed.

  18. #78

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    I personally agree with Burr on this. He's writing this article for the readers of GQ, who read the magazine for opinions on how to be appealing to women. Women are not attracted to things that smell like their fathers, which many of the scents loved on Basenotes do. I'm not neccesarily knocking your frags, as I agree they are pieces of art, masterpieces, whathaveyou, but if your average woman of generally attractive age associates that frag with her father, it's not going to be as appealing to her.
    Oddly enough, this issue has also come up before here (which issue hasn't?), when posts here pointed to someone's seduction site - where one of his major tips was that women are very much attracted to men wearing scents akin to what their father's wore.
    How true that is, I don't know - it's hard to test as, I can't imagine huge numbers of men wearing scents in the past (they're still in a minority now).

    What has me curious is the logical inverse of the above - are women attracted to men wearing scents that their mothers wore?
    Renato
    Last edited by Renato; 18th March 2009 at 12:38 AM.

  19. #79

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Renato View Post
    Upon further reflection, I realised that I left out something near and dear in my earlier analysis of the article. So, for the sake of being comprehensive -

    "Steer clear of anything that reads "Dad," stamps an invisible date on you (1986, say),"

    Why, this is nothing more than a rephrasing one of our favourite topics here, namely when some newbie posts about
    "Old Man's Scents"

    Usually, that is met with numerous responses about not being silly, that there is no such a thing as an Old Man's Scent, that scents stand on their own, that they're classic works of art, etc etc etc.

    How come the deafening silence here, when the same thing is said by an "authority"?
    Were the newbies right after all?

    Renato

    P.S. - I note from Narcus's list above, that the writer doesn't apply this same criterion to scents that could just as easily be labelled as "Old Women's Scents".
    I wonder why that is?
    Renato,
    Would you quit trying to ramp up the energy on these themes? Do you want attention?

    You sure are trying to create fuss about all the hot button issues the board can face. Trying deliberately too.

    I asked you once to chill out and lighten up.
    --Chris
    Last edited by DustB; 18th March 2009 at 01:01 AM.
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  20. #80

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by kbe View Post
    I don't read GQ but...are any of the suggested fragrances advertised in that issue, the previous few issues or will they be advertised in near future issues? That would be too much of a coincidence, wouldn't it..
    Could be but since I've been reading Chandler Burr, he's mentioned Happy, 2, and Light Blue several times.

  21. #81
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by kbe View Post
    I don't read GQ but...are any of the suggested fragrances advertised in that issue, the previous few issues or will they be advertised in near future issues? That would be too much of a coincidence, wouldn't it..
    Quote Originally Posted by nthny View Post
    Could be but since I've been reading Chandler Burr, he's mentioned Happy, 2, and Light Blue several times.
    Here are the frags from that issue (there are clothes from EVERY designer - and those nebulous designer ads that seem to be for nothing in particular - not counted)...

    Hugo Element
    Diesel Fuel For Life
    DKNY Men (with sample flap)
    D&G the one For Men (with sample flap)
    Dirty English
    Burberry The Beat For Men
    Burberry The Beat For Men (with sample flap) (really pushing this one)
    Burberry The Beat For Men (holy sh1t!)
    Burberry The Beat For Men (surprise 2-page spread - just when you thought no more BTBFM)
    Burberry The Beat For Men (Full page bottle. Die, Burberry, Die.)
    Old Spice Body Wash (technically not a fragrance, but Death To Burberry)

    That's all, folks. There's a D&G scent in there, but that one (Michael McConaughey ad) is in every issue. I'll be honest - given that Burr got semi-burned for giving out free samples, I think he's a bit careful on the ethics. (Yes - the height of scandal. He reviewed Sel de Vétiver favorably, and then at one of his talk dinners, he gave out free samples that were given to him later. OMG - end of the world!) Actually, if GQ would have tipped off the makers of Burr's recommended fragrances AFTER he wrote the review, it would be standard business practice, from the targeted ads I've seen in mags. But I'm pretty sure that they would almost be forced to delay an ad that matched his recomendations, to avoid the appearance of impropriety.

    Now if he would have recommended Burberry The Beat For Men? Yeah - get the torches and pitchforks. But I see no reason to hold the man. Case dismissed.

    (However, will a recommended frag advertise in the next issue? You bet your bottom dollar, if competent marketing is anywhere near that article.)
    * * * *

  22. #82
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    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Astaroth View Post
    The idea that frequent temperature changes, in and of themselves, damage a fragrance is simply wrong. The time scale over which chemical reactions occur is much faster than the time scale over which a bottle warms up and cools down. As far as temperature goes, the only things that matter from the standpoint of chemical reactivity are (1) what is the temperature of the liquid, and (2) how long was the liquid at that temperature. These two factors govern how far chemical degradation is able to proceed.
    I think the "changing temperatures" myth is the one I would most like to eliminate, although I don't blame people for believing it. The latter, mostly because it does have a source in truth - i.e., you can see where it came from. When people have frags at room temperature, which undergo excursions to higher temperatures, it almost seems like it was the up-and-down change that nailed the juice. In some sense it was, but only in that it meant the frag got up to a high temperature. Barring any pressure-change effects (such as bringing fresh air in and out of the bottle - obviously bad), the change per se is not what causes problems - it is the fact that you changed TO a higher temperature (actually higher temperatureS) and the frag spent time there. It would actually be worse if you simply stayed at the higher temperature. Conversely, changes to lower temperatures are good, and staying at those low temperatures is even better.

    A good way to understand this - what you were saying - is to consider dropping a glass bottle out of a slow-moving, open-air elevator. When it's on the ground, your glass bottle is fine after a short drop. When you're up high, the glass bottle will break. Whether you're moving up or down, which is slow relative to the speed at which the bottle hits the ground, just doesn't matter that much. Exactly how high you are when you drop the bottle - the potential energy that is directly proportional to your height - that matters.

    Or you can view it as cars running around on a continent that's undergoing continental drift. The energy of the speedy little cars is what matters - not their extra car energy from continental drift (which is negligible).

    The molecules in perfume are quite busy. They spend a lot of life at each microdegree of change. They don't care which way the temperature is moving or how fast - just where it is at every moment.
    * * * *

  23. #83

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Quote Originally Posted by Sokkou View Post
    I personally agree with Burr on this. He's writing this article for the readers of GQ, who read the magazine for opinions on how to be appealing to women. Women are not attracted to things that smell like their fathers, which many of the scents loved on Basenotes do. I'm not neccesarily knocking your frags, as I agree they are pieces of art, masterpieces, whathaveyou, but if your average woman of generally attractive age associates that frag with her father, it's not going to be as appealing to her.
    These are just vast generalizations.

  24. #84

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    Re storage, I have a chest of drawers in my north-facing master bathroom closet. I keep the frags inside one of the drawers (not on top, as some will say any ambient light will impact the juice)

    I hadn't heard the thing about top of the forearms versus inside of forearms.

    JD

  25. #85

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    One thing I do agree with is Burr's suggestion to include a spritz down the back, something most guys probably wouldn't think to do. We are three-dimensional beings though, n'est pas? In practice, it's easier said than done. If I'm wearing a t-shirt, I'll spritz the back of it before putting it on.

  26. #86

    Default Re: All You Really Need to Know About Cologne - March GQ (US)

    As for Burr's recommendation on steering away Old Man's scents, he forgot the first and only Rule of real Perfumistos: Wear what smells good on you! I tried sampling Drakkar Noir for the very first time in my life last Friday and thought, "So much better than Cool Water or GIT" - it'll smell great on me if applied sparingly!

    I mean, if one shouldn't wear "Old"-smelling scents, next time I'm going out dancing, I'm going to be daring and put on Shalimar. Yup, I'll see Burr's "Old Man Scent" comment and up the ante by going, "Oh yeah? How about Old Woman Scent?"
    Last edited by GourmandHomme; 22nd March 2009 at 11:39 PM.

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