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  1. #1

    Default Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Aside from the common sneezing fit that a lot of allergy sufferers get from a first sniff of a perfume, I just don't understand the other physical ailments people suffer from a perfume. I have allergies and take medicine for it. I've experimented sniffing perfumes with and without my allergy medicines and there's only one that made me sneeze a lot no matter what (Bulgari pour Homme).

    Headaches... what causes a perfume to give someone a headache? It's not like it's making you concentrate too hard or it rapped your head against the wall five times.

    Stomach aches... did the perfume make you hungry or give you food poisoning or something?

    What are people specific reactions other than "it makes me sick"?

    Please, nothing snippy like "I don't get why people wear xxxx it makes my head hurt".

  2. #2

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Coco Mademoiselle - "makes me randy" no explaination necessary.

    Juicy by Juicy Couture - "makes me dizzy" (that might have been because I was holding my breath in an elevator trying my hardest not to inhale any of it)

    Annick Goutal's Petite Cherie - "makes me salivate", this yummy fruity fragrance makes me want to bite any girl who's wearing it

  3. #3

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Both from reading and personal experience, migraine headaches can be assoicated with smelling certain fragrances. Thankfully, not many for me. How do migraines work? There are multiple theories. Here are extracts from Wikipedia's article on the subject:

    Depolarization theory
    A phenomenon known as cortical spreading depression can cause migraines.[38] In cortical spreading depression, neurological activity is depressed over an area of the cortex of the brain. This situation results in the release of inflammatory mediators leading to irritation of cranial nerve roots, most particularly the trigeminal nerve, which conveys the sensory information for the face and much of the head.

    This view is supported by neuroimaging techniques, which appear to show that migraine is primarily a disorder of the brain (neurological), not of the blood vessels (vascular). A spreading depolarization (electrical change) may begin 24 hours before the attack, with onset of the headache occurring around the time when the largest area of the brain is depolarized. A French study in 2007, using the Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technique identified the hypothalamus as being critically involved in the early stages.[39]


    [edit] Vascular theory
    Migraines can begin when blood vessels in the brain contract and expand inappropriately. This may start in the occipital lobe, in the back of the brain, as arteries spasm. The reduced flow of blood from the occipital lobe triggers the aura that some individuals who have migraines experience because the visual cortex is in the occipital area.[35][unreliable source?]

    When the constriction stops and the blood vessels dilate, they become too wide. The once solid walls of the blood vessels become permeable and some fluid leaks out. This leakage is recognized by pain receptors in the blood vessels of surrounding tissue. In response, the body supplies the area with chemicals which cause inflammation. With each heart beat, blood passes through this sensitive area causing a throb of pain.[35][unreliable source?]

    The vascular theory of migraines is now seen as secondary to brain dysfunction.[35][unreliable source?]


    [edit] Serotonin theory
    Serotonin is a type of neurotransmitter, or "communication chemical" which passes messages between nerve cells. It helps to control mood, pain sensation, sexual behaviour, sleep, as well as dilation and constriction of the blood vessels among other things. Low serotonin levels in the brain may lead to a process of constriction and dilation of the blood vessels which trigger a migraine.[35] Triptans activate serotonin receptors to stop a migraine attack.[35]


    [edit] Neural theory
    When certain nerves or an area in the brain stem become irritated, a migraine begins. In response to the irritation, the body releases chemicals which cause inflammation of the blood vessels. These chemicals cause further irritation of the nerves and blood vessels and results in pain. Substance P is one of the substances released with first irritation. Pain then increases because substance P aids in sending pain signals to the brain.[35]


    [edit] Unifying theory
    Both vascular and neural influences cause migraines.

    stress triggers changes in the brain
    these changes cause serotonin to be released
    blood vessels constrict
    chemicals including substance P irritate nerves and blood vessels causing pain[35]


    Sorry to present so much, but there is no simple answer as to cause. The bottom line is there are triggers. The trigger could be stress, or certain foods or certain smells.

    For me, I have found triptans to be effective in relieving migraine headaches.

    I have had migraines for years. Honestly, I thought they were sinus headaches because I would get a nasal discharge. Thankfully a doctor helped me get to a proper diagnosis.

    Oh, my specific symptoms are these: a pain above the right eye and a discharge from the right nostril. Sometimes nausea.
    Last edited by scentsitivity; 18th May 2009 at 05:52 PM.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    This is going to sound extremely weird. Everytime I smell Tubereuse 40 by Le Labo, I get a metallic, almost bloody taste in my mouth. It is the weirdest thing ever and is so unpleasant. At first I though it was because I quit smoking, like a side effect or something. But it's been months since I've quit, and still every damn time I smell Tubereuse 40, I get the whole bloody, metallic taste in my mouth all over again.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    The only reaction I've ever had was sneezing and sinus problems with Habit Rouge.

    Real unfortunate too, I really like it.

    The scent grows richer, he knows he must be near
    He finds a long passageway lit by chandelier
    Each step he takes, the perfumes change
    From familiar fragrance to flavours strange
    A magnificent chamber meets his eye

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    SirSlarty, I'm not exactly sure why you are asking. Do you not believe people really do get headaches &/or stomach aches from perfumes other people wear? I can't tell you the medical reasons but I can tell you from someone who loves perfume but suffers from perfume triggered migraines that these illnesses are real & debilitating.
    I did a quick Google search & quickly came up with these links which may answer your questions:
    http://www.herc.org/news/perfume/abstracts.htm

    http://www.mcs-global.org/Perfume-Fragrances_Links.htm

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/9682.php

  7. #7

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by RHM View Post
    SirSlarty, I'm not exactly sure why you are asking. Do you not believe people really do get headaches &/or stomach aches from perfumes other people wear? I can't tell you the medical reasons but I can tell you from someone who loves perfume but suffers from perfume triggered migraines that these illnesses are real & debilitating.
    I did a quick Google search & quickly came up with these links which may answer your questions:
    http://www.herc.org/news/perfume/abstracts.htm

    http://www.mcs-global.org/Perfume-Fragrances_Links.htm

    http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/9682.php


    I believe this is the main Q :
    What are people(s) specific reactions other than "it makes me sick"?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    RHM, I checked out the middle link from your above post. Already I can tell that the website or whomever is posting the info on "Global Recognition Campaign for Multiple Chemical Sensitivity" is not either doing there homework or just posting info to prove a point. I am not doubting if this condition exists, but the article on "Perfume takes command of bus driver's senses" is kinda misleading. The workers union of that citys transit system had given orders to be rude and obnoxious to transit riders. Also, that article does not make any mention of what a clown that transit operator is.

    In any event, I suppose the site is useful to help the very few individuals why they are reacting a certain way to certain things. Just like any other physical reaction in the body.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    I see.

    Surfacing, I included the wide variety of links because the entire issue is a rather hot topic & reactions run a wide range from the life threatening (asthma) to the absurd. ie: the bus driver. I thought the article should be included to illustrate the point & to be fair.

    The point is, these reactions & thus the answer to SirSlartys question is easily searched on the internet.

    However, we do discuss a lot of issues here, so let's discuss it. Let's discuss it fairly. Don't dismiss the reactions people have as limited to "the very few individuals" that you might be aware of. It's obviously a bigger issue than that.

    So to answer SirSlartys question, here are some of the physical reactions:
    Asthma attacks brought on by exposure to perfume
    Contact dermatitis, skin redness & rashes brought on by contact with perfume
    Headache, sometimes severe (migraine), sinus congestion, dizziness & nausea brought on by exposure to perfume.
    Tulane University has done a study which identified perfume as one of the top 7 triggers indoor air pollutants & triggers for asthma.

    Here's an article which was published in the Flavor and Fragrance Journal:

    "AU: Betty Bridges
    TI: Fragrance: emerging health and environmental concerns
    SO: Flavour and Fragrance Journal
    VL: 17
    NO: 5
    PG: 361-371
    YR: 2002
    CP: Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    ON: 1099-1026
    PN: 0882-5734
    AD: Fragranced Products Information Network, 12602 Reed Rock Road, Amelia, VA 23002, USA
    DOI: 10.1002/ffj.1106
    US: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ffj.1106
    AB: Products containing scent are a part of daily life. The majority of cosmetics, toiletries, household and laundry products contain fragrance. In addition, there is exposure to fragrance from products that are used to scent the air, such as air fresheners and fragranced candles. In spite of this widespread use and exposure, there is little information available on the materials used in fragrance. Fragrance formulas are considered trade secrets and components that make up the fragrance portion of the product are not revealed on labels. Fragrance is increasingly cited as a trigger in health conditions such as asthma, allergies and migraine headaches. In addition, some fragrance materials have been found to accumulate in adipose tissue and are present in breast milk. Other materials are suspected of being hormone disruptors. The implications are not fully known, as there has been little evaluation of systemic effects. There are environmental concerns as well, as fragrances are volatile compounds, which add to both indoor and outdoor air pollution. Synthetic musk compounds are persistent in the environment and contaminate waterways and aquatic wildlife. At present there is little governmental regulation of fragrance. The fragrance industry has in place a system of self-regulation. However, the present system has failed to address many of the emerging concerns. Industry needs to responsibly address concerns and ensure that scented products are safe for users, those inadvertently exposed and the environment. It is essential that an industry that is, and wishes to continue to be, self-regulated should identify and address concerns in a forthright and responsible manner. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd."

    My mother-in-law was an emergency room nurse. She told me of a woman who was brought in because her husband found her fainted on the bathroom floor of their home. She had just put on Obsession. Turns out, she was highly allergic to one of the ingredients in the fragrance.

    A huge issue around this is that the people who do not suffer from any of these reactions have little or no compasion or tolerance for the people who do. Yet, the people who do suffer, do indeed suffer. Just because you might not have experience with it, does not mean it doesn't exist. Nor does it mean that there aren't those who take advantage of the situation.

    And Surfacing, as for "the very few individuals" being effected, I don't think entire countries would be changing their laws for the sake of a few individuals.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by scent View Post
    This is going to sound extremely weird. Everytime I smell Tubereuse 40 by Le Labo, I get a metallic, almost bloody taste in my mouth. It is the weirdest thing ever and is so unpleasant. At first I though it was because I quit smoking, like a side effect or something. But it's been months since I've quit, and still every damn time I smell Tubereuse 40, I get the whole bloody, metallic taste in my mouth all over again.
    I get something similar with many post-1984 masculine Creeds. SMW, GIT, GV and MI all make me smell a metallic, bloody smell in my nose like a smacked it hard and I'm awaiting the red to gush. The feminine florals, VIW and pre-1985 frags don't do anything like that. Weird, no?

    As for the headache/nausea thing, when I do get them it's usually with strong florals, especially jasmine and certain strong (or strongly applied) gourmands with deep smoky vanillas. I've always been one to get headaches and nausea from certain weather patterns. The ill feelings I experience from the aformentioned perfumes are very much like what I experience during overcast skies on warm, muggy days before it rains. If you don't know what I'm referencing then it doesn't really make sense but there you have it.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    I get the occasional sneeze or two from a variety of freshly applied frags. I pay the attack no mind and in a few minutes I am my usual underwear-on-the-outside super hero invulnerable self.
    Last edited by kbe; 18th May 2009 at 11:19 PM.
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    This is kinda embarrassing, but I usually get terrible bowel cramping when I wear Paloma Picasso. Other strong chypres can do this too, often to the point that I have to use the bathroom. This lasts for about 15 minutes, then I feel fine, but it really it quite painful for a while. Since I love PP in the winter I just put up with it. Kinda crazy, yes, but aren't we all a little nuts about our passion for fragrance?

    I also used to experience the same thing when walking into a smoke-filled, hole-in-the-wall dive bar. I'd get immediately overwhelmed by the smell and go straight to the bathroom, then feel fine for the rest of the night. I love dive bars too, so I wasn't deterred there either.

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  13. #13

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    The oakmoss in Lubin's L'Eau Neuve gives me sneezing, shortness of breath, and an elevated heart rate... awesome. That one is the worst, mostly if I overapply some of the others in my collection I'll just get a brief sneez-athon.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    The fragrance that kills me is Elizabeth Arden's Red Door- I can not be near this scent. When I was younger I suffered from migraine headaches and their is something in this scent that out of the blue evokes them on me.

    A few years ago I met my mother and a friend of hers in Boston for drinks and her friend took a bath in Red Door (trust I know that smell) I hardly make it to rest room before puking all over myself - I had a migraine for a week after that.

    Same happened when a date decided to take a bath in that scent - let's say I never set eyes on that women again!
    Last edited by scentimus; 19th May 2009 at 12:07 AM.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Heritage EdT and / or Vetiver EdT by Guerlain, if over applied, give me a headache right in the temple area and at the base of my skull. An ache similar to when I was addicted to caffeine and used to get withdrawal headaches some mornings when I didn't have my coffee before 9 a.m. That pain. Horrible.

    Emerald Dream by Estee Lauder and Tom Ford Extreme by Tom Ford, even when applied sparingly, gave me a lingering stomachache and slight nausea. Not like I had eaten something and could feel it gurgling in my stomach, rather a large aura of pressure on my lower stomach and upper bowel. I used to get stomach aches like this when I would smell copier toner cartridges / copier ink for a long time (I used to work in a high school copier center as a part time job when I was young).

    A handful of Jean Claude Ellena scents (Rose Poivree, Un Jardin sur le Nil, etc) make me itch immediately when the juice hits my skin. It happens EVERY time I spray it on. The sensation of 'itchiness' fades in a few seconds. Weird.
    Last edited by mikeperez23; 19th May 2009 at 12:21 AM.
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Some fragrances make me nauseous if I put them on while on an empty stomach. I couldn't tell you which ones because I've never made a point of noting it, but it does happen.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Burberry Weekend Makes Me Want To Heave!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Hard for me to relate to many of the above posts. I personally haven't had any adverse effects from applying fragrances.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    My most frequent reaction is headache--it comes on slowly and then eventually turns into a full blown migraine with light sensitivity and nasal congestion if I don't get away from the fragrance in question. Usually it is attributed to Iso E Super (in my case).

    I am pretty sure I am sensitive to Oakmoss and some citrus notes--they cause sinus swelling and some post nasal drip (typical allergy type response). This doesn't typically turn into a migraine, so I just try to not inhale the mist when I spray.

    Narciso Rodrigues for Her, Angel and some other scents with a certain kind of patchouli make my throat close.

    Tobacco and Calone both make me nauseated to the point of feeling like I may vomit. It happens every time, even though I very much like the smell of tobacco.

  20. #20

    Arrow Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by RHM View Post
    I see.

    Surfacing, I included the wide variety of links because the entire issue is a rather hot topic & reactions run a wide range from the life threatening (asthma) to the absurd. ie: the bus driver. I thought the article should be included to illustrate the point & to be fair.

    The point is, these reactions & thus the answer to SirSlartys question is easily searched on the internet.

    However, we do discuss a lot of issues here, so let's discuss it. Let's discuss it fairly. Don't dismiss the reactions people have as limited to "the very few individuals" that you might be aware of. It's obviously a bigger issue than that.

    So to answer SirSlartys question, here are some of the physical reactions:
    Asthma attacks brought on by exposure to perfume
    Contact dermatitis, skin redness & rashes brought on by contact with perfume
    Headache, sometimes severe (migraine), sinus congestion, dizziness & nausea brought on by exposure to perfume.
    Tulane University has done a study which identified perfume as one of the top 7 triggers indoor air pollutants & triggers for asthma.

    Here's an article which was published in the Flavor and Fragrance Journal:

    "AU: Betty Bridges
    TI: Fragrance: emerging health and environmental concerns
    SO: Flavour and Fragrance Journal
    VL: 17
    NO: 5
    PG: 361-371
    YR: 2002
    CP: Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
    ON: 1099-1026
    PN: 0882-5734
    AD: Fragranced Products Information Network, 12602 Reed Rock Road, Amelia, VA 23002, USA
    DOI: 10.1002/ffj.1106
    US: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ffj.1106
    AB: Products containing scent are a part of daily life. The majority of cosmetics, toiletries, household and laundry products contain fragrance. In addition, there is exposure to fragrance from products that are used to scent the air, such as air fresheners and fragranced candles. In spite of this widespread use and exposure, there is little information available on the materials used in fragrance. Fragrance formulas are considered trade secrets and components that make up the fragrance portion of the product are not revealed on labels. Fragrance is increasingly cited as a trigger in health conditions such as asthma, allergies and migraine headaches. In addition, some fragrance materials have been found to accumulate in adipose tissue and are present in breast milk. Other materials are suspected of being hormone disruptors. The implications are not fully known, as there has been little evaluation of systemic effects. There are environmental concerns as well, as fragrances are volatile compounds, which add to both indoor and outdoor air pollution. Synthetic musk compounds are persistent in the environment and contaminate waterways and aquatic wildlife. At present there is little governmental regulation of fragrance. The fragrance industry has in place a system of self-regulation. However, the present system has failed to address many of the emerging concerns. Industry needs to responsibly address concerns and ensure that scented products are safe for users, those inadvertently exposed and the environment. It is essential that an industry that is, and wishes to continue to be, self-regulated should identify and address concerns in a forthright and responsible manner. Copyright © 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd."

    My mother-in-law was an emergency room nurse. She told me of a woman who was brought in because her husband found her fainted on the bathroom floor of their home. She had just put on Obsession. Turns out, she was highly allergic to one of the ingredients in the fragrance.

    A huge issue around this is that the people who do not suffer from any of these reactions have little or no compasion or tolerance for the people who do. Yet, the people who do suffer, do indeed suffer. Just because you might not have experience with it, does not mean it doesn't exist. Nor does it mean that there aren't those who take advantage of the situation.

    And Surfacing, as for "the very few individuals" being effected, I don't think entire countries would be changing their laws for the sake of a few individuals.
    Well, I don't mean to sound as though I was simply dismissing those few individuals. I would not wear a frag to a clinic or hospital. As well, I do realize there are substances that cause bad reactions to someone suffering from the above mentioned conditions. I think reading many of those links made me a bit crabby, especially the ones that I know are somewhat exaggerating.

    But in any event, allergies are serious. And yes, above you mentioned contact dermatitis. I forgot all about that one, but since I have been somewhat interested in the subject of skin health, I should have got that one. Contact Dermatitis is definitely one. I think I have even heard a couple or more posters in the men's forum mention they get reactions from a certain fragrance ( redness). That's certainly not normal or acceptable.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    I have trouble with many "leathers" and Guerlains. The leathers (in fragrances but not true leathers) often are so vile smelling that I have to wash them off immediately. I usually am extremely annoyed by "violet leaf" and "orchid" - again, the anoyance comes from fragrances but not from the real things. I find Green Irish Tweed very annoying. Birch tar is repulsive.

    Habit Rouge and Guerlain Vetiver can stop my breathing. Mitsouko gives off a terrible stench, but it at least I can breathe. With the Guerlains, I have no problem with the original versions - it's only the reformulated ones that cause my problems.

    I have over twenty samples of fragrances that I haven't and won't review because they come across so repulsively.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    I get headaches often when someone is wearing a strong fragrance. It's almost always when somebody's cologne/perfume sillage extends beyond their personal space (ie. Somebody walks into my bar and I can smell their cologne/perfume from 10 feet away or more.) It happened to me the other night-- this woman's perfume gave me a splitting headache.

    Another bad effect of too much fragrance is that it can cause a person's nose to run or become stopped up. There are some fragrances which I cannot wear because they make my nose stuffy and I have to spend the rest of the evening mouth-breathing--D&G By Man for example. Not only does this happen to me, but I've noticed sometimes that it can do the same thing to those around me.

    I agree with Foetidus about some of the Guerlains such as Habit Rouge and Vetiver. Both have caused sneezing fits and headaches for my coworkers-- and that was with VERY conservative application. I still think of these as masterpiece fragrances and I wear them still-- but I am very careful with them and usually I save them for nights when I'm working solo and I won't have many coworkers in my space.

    Also the trick (for me) with some of these fragrances is to wait a moderately long time between showering/bathing and putting on fragrance. Some of these fragrances bloom too much when put on right after a shower (hot skin+ soap, shampoo, etc). If I'm gonna wear one of my "heavies" I'll sometimes get my shower out of the way earlier so I can have more time to let my skin calm down before applying fragrance. Though, sometimes if I haven't showered and I'm just heading to pick up some groceries or something, I'll go with a spray of Habit Rouge or Kouros as a quick pick-me-up. A "whore's shower" is great if you go easy.

    The migraines are a whole other issue for me. I get them pretty bad sometimes and I'm not sure exactly what triggers them. They terrify me though, because the symptoms are so scary (visual aura, numbness on one side of my body/headache, etc). I had a stretch last year where I got them more regularly than normal and I think it may be connected with my DIY perfumery materials. I don't have a proper lab and ventilation can be tricky. Sometimes I would spend a lot of time smelling and mixing materials and it would make me dizzy later. Then out of the blue I would get a migraine episode. I decided to cut back on my DIY perfumery because of the headaches. One day I'll have the proper workspace to dedicate to it and hopefully things will be better.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    I have experienced moderate to severe asthmatic reactions when exposed to Beyond Paradise. Smelling Drakkar Noir makes me feel nauseated: my mouth fills with saliva, and I feel as though I am going to vomit. Also, Drakkar Noir can produce pain in my temples, especially the left side.
    Snarky is as snarky does.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Actually my reason for posting was because I read so many reviews that said "makes me sick" and they give it a thumbs down. Just trying to justify me doing the same with having to go all technobabble as to why a little molecule made my stomach ill.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by foetidus View Post
    I have over twenty samples of fragrances that I haven't and won't review because they come across so repulsively.
    Yeah I've a few like that... I hate having them sit around begging me to say something about them.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    My first wearing of Amor pour homme by Cacharel I had a severe headache, but it seems like I got used to it, hasnt hapenenned again.

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Oakmoss, a very common ingredient in fragrances remains one of the leading causes of allergic reactions.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Must mostly be due to some cheap synthetic .. in recent memory, Iceberg Twice homme has made me sneeze and still does.
    -

  29. #29

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Looking at my own reviews, I found one where I mention that Ava Luxe's Loukhoum made me ill to my stomach. I don't remember why I wrote that exactly BUT I'll guess that it's because it smelled very gourmand and maybe I was hungry?

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by zztopp View Post
    Must mostly be due to some cheap synthetic .. in recent memory, Iceberg Twice homme has made me sneeze and still does.
    A very good thread, one which weighs in on the subject of synthetic vs natural.

    http://community.basenotes.net/showthread.php?t=223166
    Last edited by RHM; 20th May 2009 at 12:46 AM.

  31. #31

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Luckily I don't get any adverse health effects from any fragrances... however; I do get a disgusting headache and stomach issues from reading some of the ridiculously sh@tty comments a relative few people post on these threads (I have one "sweet" person in mind)... The closest thing I've ever had to an extremely negative experience was the eyewatering effect Romance had on me the first twelve times I tried it... I gave up and sold it for 10 bucks on ebay
    At your service

  32. #32

    Default Re: Reactions to Perfumes - Headaches, Sneezing and Stomachaches

    Quote Originally Posted by SirSlarty View Post
    Aside from the common sneezing fit that a lot of allergy sufferers get from a first sniff of a perfume, I just don't understand the other physical ailments people suffer from a perfume. I have allergies and take medicine for it. I've experimented sniffing perfumes with and without my allergy medicines and there's only one that made me sneeze a lot no matter what (Bulgari pour Homme).

    Headaches... what causes a perfume to give someone a headache?
    What causes a perfume to give someone a headache? For what might possibly be an answer to your question, I suggest some internet searches on different combinations of the words: "Fragrance", "Perfume", "Neurotoxic", and "Neurotoxin".

    Here is just one web page from such a search that might provide a clue (I emphasize "might provide a clue") as to why perfumes could be (and I emphasize "could be") the cause of headaches: http://www.herc.org/news/perfume/scents.htm and here is an excerpt from this particular web page:

    In 1986 the National Academy of Sciences targeted fragrances as one of the six categories of chemicals that should be given high priority for neurotoxicity testing. The other groups include insecticides, heavy metals, solvents, food additives and certain air pollutants. The report states that 95% of chemicals used in fragrances are synthetic compounds derived from petroleum. They include benzene derivatives, aldehydes, and many other known toxics and sensitizers - capable of causing cancer, birth defects, central nervous system disorders and allergic reactions. "Neurotoxins: At Home and the Workplace" (Report by the Committee on Science and Technology. U.S. House of Representatives, Sept, 16, 1986) [Report 99-827]

    A few chemicals found in fragrances known to be neurotoxic: hexachlorophene; acetyl-ethyl-tetramethyl-tetralin; zinc-pyridinethione; 2,4,dinitro-3-methyl-6-tert-butylanisole; 1-Butanol; 2-butanol; tert-Butanol; Isobutanol; t-Butyl Toluene. Neurotoxic properties of chemicals found in fragrances have caused testicular atrophy in lab animals as well as myelin disease. The myelin sheath protects the nerves and does not regenerate. (Compiled from TOXLINE database of fragrances industry and medical journals.)

    A few chemicals found in fragrances known to cause cancer and birth defects: methylene chloride; toluene; methyl ethyl ketone; methyl isobutyl ketone; tert Butyl; sec Butyl; benzyl chloride. (Compiled by comparing a list of 120 fragrance chemicals from the EPA obtained through the Freedom of Information Act and California's Prop 65 List of Chemicals).

    A few chemicals found in fragrances designated as hazardous waste disposal chemicals: methylene chloride; toluene; meythl ethyl ketone; methyl isobutyl ketone; ethanol; benzal chloride. These chemicals are listed in the EPA's Code 40 of Federal Regulations, Ch 1, Section 261.33.

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    Last edited by Rockford; 20th May 2009 at 02:14 PM.

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Loving perfume on the Internet since 2000