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  1. #1
    shamu1's Avatar
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    Default Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Another one of my favorites is Monsieur de Givenchy. I've owned two bottles of it, and I had, and currently have, the earlier version of it, and I love it. I've read that it's been reformulated (I don't just assume that because a fragrance has a new bottle, that it's been reformulated). I'm almost out of my current bottle of the old, and am interested in trying the new version. What's it like? Any thoughts, comparisons would be appreciated.

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    jss's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Hope that itd not be bad as Givenchy Gentleman reformulated.

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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    I had the chance of trying the original and the new one, hand in hand. And they are different in terms of depth. The actual one is more akin to a light eau de toilette, I would say it is an eau de cologne. The old one was stronger - indolic or animalic notes in its drydown is more prominent in the older version.

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    shamu1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by Pollux View Post
    I had the chance of trying the original and the new one, hand in hand. And they are different in terms of depth. The actual one is more akin to a light eau de toilette, I would say it is an eau de cologne. The old one was stronger - indolic or animalic notes in its drydown is more prominent in the older version.
    That doesn't sound too encouraging about the new one. The one and only complaint I've ever had about the vintage is that it's too damn light - after two hours, I can't smell it at all. I don't know if I'm going to get the new one then. I don't want to spend $40 just to get the equivalent of 4711 in a Givenchy bottle. Do you like the new version?

  5. #5
    Dependent

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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    I do enjoy the current one, though not fortunate enough to have sampled/tried the older version. But from what im gathering, its watered down? as with most formulation renewals... I'm not too sure tho if i would prefer a more potent version of this, probably not. Its quite "thick" already imo.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    I haven't tried the old either, but I quite like the new. Similar to Eau Sauvage in the opening, then it gets a bit musky/soapy. I find it very nostalgic and easy to wear.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions


    As with all the classics, what suffers most with reformulation is the irreplaceable, natural citrus component of the fragrance and, of course, the base notes, like oakmoss, that are unfortunately replaced either for reasons of cost or in order to conform to allergen restriction mandates.

    Monsieur de Givenchy has not suffered much in the heart notes and the base notes.
    The transition from natural civet to synthetic civet has been handled with care. It has, however, lost the exalting, verbena dominant citrus opening accord that lasted well into the heart notes. Eau Sauvage has suffered along similar lines; although, its citrus opening always proved to be more ethereal and evanescent than Monsieur de Givenchy's even if equally transcendent.

    On a side note, if one likes Monsieur de Givenchy, one should try
    , in my opinion, the most accomplished and refined men's citrus ever, Signoricci 2 (later rereleased and slightly reformulated as Signoricci, not to be confused with the 2005 rerelease and reformulation of Signoricci, which is pure swill and an utter travesty of the original). Signoricci and Monsieur de Givenchy are prime examples in the masterful art of the use of civet as a fixative.

    scentemental

    Last edited by scentemental; 3rd June 2009 at 12:26 PM.

  8. #8
    Dependent

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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Thats great info scentemental now i want to try Signoricci 2 (previously oblivious to me)
    thanks for the sharing

  9. #9

    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by matthewfoo View Post
    Thats great info scentemental now i want to try Signoricci 2 (previously oblivious to me)
    thanks for the sharing

    My pleasure matthewfoo. You really ought to try Signoricci 2 if you can get your hands on some.

    scentemental

  10. #10
    shamu1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post

    As with all the classics, what suffers most with reformulation is the irreplaceable, natural citrus component of the fragrance and, of course, the base notes, like oakmoss, that are unfortunately replaced either for reasons of cost or in order to conform to allergen restriction mandates.

    Monsieur de Givenchy has not suffered much in the heart notes and the base notes.
    The transition from natural civet to synthetic civet has been handled with care. It has, however, lost the exalting, verbena dominant citrus opening accord that lasted well into the heart notes. Eau Sauvage has suffered along similar lines; although, its citrus opening always proved to be more ethereal and evanescent than Monsieur de Givenchy's even if equally transcendent.

    On a side note, the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy is great Michel Hy, the same perfumer behind the most accomplished and refined men's citrus ever, in my opinion, Signoricci 2 (later rereleased and slightly reformulated as Signoricci, not to be confused with the 2005 rerelease and reformulation of Signoricci, which is pure swill and an utter travesty of the original). If one pays careful attention to Monsieur de Givenchy and Signoricci 2, one can clearly discern that they are by the same perfumer, particularly in the masterful use of civet and as the main fixative.

    scentemental


    I thought MdG was composed by Francis Fabron?

    Not to stray off-topic too much, but I have to ask you when Eau Sauvage was reformulated? I've been wearing it for over 15 years, have gone through about 6 bottles of it, and I've noticed no difference in the scent at all.

    Glad to hear someone else appreciates Signoricci 2! It's just so elegant and beautiful - one of the best citrus fragrances I've ever smelled. I've been wearing it for a good ten years.

    As you can probably tell, I tend to wear older classic fragrances.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by shamu1 View Post
    I thought MdG was composed by Francis Fabron?

    Not to stray off-topic too much, but I have to ask you when Eau Sauvage was reformulated? I've been wearing it for over 15 years, have gone through about 6 bottles of it, and I've noticed no difference in the scent at all.

    Glad to hear someone else appreciates Signoricci 2! It's just so elegant and beautiful - one of the best citrus fragrances I've ever smelled. I've been wearing it for a good ten years.

    As you can probably tell, I tend to wear older classic fragrances.

    That's the trouble with Web. One source becomes the basis of many other sources. I did some research, and it seems my information about Michel Hy being the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy can only be traced back to one internet sources and an unreliable one at that, and so my claim that Michel Hy is the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy is suspect. I just found two very credible sources that list Francis Fabron as the perfumer of Monsieur de Givenchy, so I am inclined to say yes, it does look like Francis Fabron is the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy. Sorry about that.

    I first wore Eau Sauvage back in 1978 and wore it consistently throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. It's definitely not the same fragrance as today's. It was still pretty much the same when I wore it in the late 1980s/early 1990s. I suspect it was reformulated sometime in the early nineties, about the time when you started wearing it. I can't say if it has undergone reformulation since then, but when I tried it recently at Sephora, I found it dull and the lacking joy. The original formulation was sparkling, buoyant, limpid; it had had such a beautiful opening citrus herbal accord that it inspired joy in one. It was an exalting experience to smell it. In fact, when I used to wear it, I used to reapply it every hour or so just so I good get a hit of that wonderful opening citrus herbal accord. That's was easy and cheap to do. I had one of those 1 liter bottles Eau Sauvage was available in. That exalting opening citrus herbal accord is definitely not there in the current version. I remember it also had much better longevity and a steadier more consistent output. I suspect the oakmoss in it has been tampered with. It's still a excellent fragrance compared to what's out there, but it's not the same as the original formulation, and that is too be expect for the same reasons listed above in discussion of Monsieur de Givenchy.

    scentemental

    Last edited by scentemental; 3rd June 2009 at 12:27 PM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    [COLOR=Blue]
    As with all the classics, what suffers most with reformulation is the irreplaceable, natural citrus component of the fragrance and, of course, the base notes, like oakmoss, that are unfortunately replaced either for reasons of cost or in order to conform to allergen restriction mandates.

    ...
    As usual, your posts are a pleasure to read!

    Now, back to the topic, is this oakmoss ban restricted to France? Some of Puig's scents marketed here in Argentina and produced locally as well as in Spain do mention evernia prunastri as an ingredient.

    Moreover, they just launched a version of Heno de Pravia, Agua de Pravia, which is a very inexpensive and accesible eau de cologne with a prominent civet / oakmoss note in the drydown that is precisely what I can't notice in the present version of Monsieur de Givenchy (and, as a matter if fact, it is becoming my latest favorite).

    For the verbena note lost in Monsieur's, you migh as well go for YSL Pour Homme...

  13. #13
    shamu1's Avatar
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    Default Re: Monsieur de Givenchy - old vs. new versions

    Quote Originally Posted by scentemental View Post
    shamu1,

    That's the trouble with Web. One source becomes the basis of many other sources. I did some research, and it seems my information about Michel Hy being the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy can only be traced back to one internet sources and an unreliable one at that, and so my claim that Michel Hy is the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy is suspect. I just found two very credible sources that list Francis Fabron as the perfumer of Monsieur de Givenchy, so I am inclined to say yes, it does look like Francis Fabron is the perfumer behind Monsieur de Givenchy. Sorry about that.

    I first wore Eau Sauvage back in 1978 and wore it consistently throughout the 1980s and early 1990s. It's definitely not the same fragrance as today's. It was still pretty much the same when I wore it in the late 1980s/early 1990s. I suspect it was reformulated sometime in the early nineties, about the time when you started wearing it. I can't say if it has undergone reformulation since then, but when I tried it recently at Sephora, I found it dull and the lacking joy. The original formulation was sparkling, buoyant, limpid; it had had such a beautiful opening citrus herbal accord that it inspired joy in one. It was an exalting experience to smell it. In fact, when I used to wear it, I used to reapply it every hour or so just so I good get a hit of that wonderful opening citrus herbal accord. That's was easy and cheap to do. I had one of those 1 liter bottles Eau Sauvage was available in. That exalting opening citrus herbal accord is definitely not there in the current version. I remember it also had much better longevity and a steadier more consistent output. I suspect the oakmoss in it has been tampered with. It's still a excellent fragrance compared to what's out there, but it's not the same as the original formulation, and that is too be expect for the same reasons listed above in discussion of Monsieur de Givenchy.

    Yes, Signorrici is just simply superb. Glad to see another admirer. Please, don't even bother trying the 2005 rerelease, reformulation. It will simply depress.

    BTW, since you're an admirer of Signoricci, did you know that it was also available in a "Haute Concentration" form?

    Older classical fragrances are the way to go. That's what I've learned with 35 years of fragrance wearing experience behind me.

    scentemental


    Is the earlier of ES more like ES Extreme? I'm not too crazy about ES Extreme.

    As for Signoricci, I love the concentration of the regular version, it's perfect. I'm not sure I need a more concentrated version of it.

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