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Thread: Hedione

  1. #1
    Asha's Avatar
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    Default Hedione

    Compiled from the Note Identification Project Thread:

    Hedione - both as a 12% solution and as pure liquid. It had a nice odor, a little floral, but not strong to me (?). Not sure if my nose is simply dead at this point. I was reaching for the coffee quite a bit. Fresh ground is awesome in that respect. And then I pulled out benzyl acetate. Wow! Powerful, fruity stuff, it resembles ethyl acetate (paint & household solvent) and the other acetates used in gunpowder solvents. Lots and lots and lots of volume. Maybe a bit jasminy, but not really. It's totally unlike the naturals, and has major penetration. It's not listed on the bottle of JdN, but a similar substance is - benzyl salicylate - which I'll try later.

    Hedione: I dunno if my nose is starting to fail or this really does not smell like anything in particular. It smells very light, rather vaguely sweet fruity/floral. Also came off slightly powdery.

    Hedione, 2% dilution in carrier oil: wow - this is Eau Sauvage alright! I can see why this synth is so popular - it is a very fine note of citrusy jasmine with a tender caress of a milky sandalwood-like background. It is really very, very pleasant.

    Hedione Ė Bulgari Au The Rouge (which was one of my reference scents for a prominent hedione note).

    Hedione Ė Iím not smelling anything floral here, despite its categorization. More like sandalwood in its ďliftingĒ effect, with a peppery/woody topnote, not much sweetness, yet a milky undercurrent. It is very bright. I can see why this is used to liven up florals. By itself, it is a little too sharp and jarring for me to wear. But if any fragrance I was making started smelling heavy and dull, I would add this substance. It smells like sunshine on roses. Bulgari Thť Rouge, yes.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Hedione, or methyl dihydrojasmonate, which was isolated and synthesized in 1962, exists in nature in jasmine and in tea. Its first major use was in Edmond Roudnitska 's Eau Sauvage; he was to use it again often after that. Hedione's effect is to reinforce diffusion, freshness and volume in a composition, as an "odor booster." It is very commonly used today in the majority of perfumes. Taken in isolation, hedione has a light, subtle, green, transparent jasmine note, and gives an impression of "perfumed air."
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  3. #3

    Default Re: Hedione

    I must say that hedione doesn't smell like anything to me. In fact, when I'm doing my morning nose training I recognize it by the absence of any smell. Perhaps I'm anosmic to it? Despite this I'm eager to learn how to use it.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Quote Originally Posted by James Peterson View Post
    I must say that hedione doesn't smell like anything to me. In fact, when I'm doing my morning nose training I recognize it by the absence of any smell. Perhaps I'm anosmic to it? Despite this I'm eager to learn how to use it.
    Thatís perfectly normal - almost everyone finds hedione on itís own hard to detect and very mild in scent. It does have a surprising, profound and nearly always positive effect in a blend though: increasing florality, diffusion and brightness.

    The other thing it does, which isnít often mentioned, is to act as a very effective fixative. Iíve also read somewhere that it makes a good solvent for some crystalline musks, though Iíve not tested that myself.
    Chris Bartlett
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    Default Re: Hedione

    I have samples of hedione, hedione HC and splendione. The HC has the strongest scent on its own, but I can hardly detect the splendione, though perhaps it increases florality etc as Chris has mentioned?

    -

  6. #6

    Default Re: Hedione

    Quote Originally Posted by James Peterson View Post
    I must say that hedione doesn't smell like anything to me.
    I have heard a lot of people saying the same thing.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Hedione is a strange molecule. Most people are disappointed when they first smell it. It is what it does to fragrance that is its strength. Not only does it boost strength and diffusiveness, blend beautifully with floral notes and act as a fixative, it is super with all citrus accords, giving them a sheen and brightness than cannot be obtained with anything else. It was first used in Eau Sauvage, after all.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    ...sounds like this note has an effect of a baker yeast? and anavoidable ingredient of almost any perfume?

    is there any sense to combine hedione with ISO E super in the same perfume, which i read has similar use as diffuser?

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Quote Originally Posted by iivanita View Post
    ...sounds like this note has an effect of a baker yeast? and anavoidable ingredient of almost any perfume?

    is there any sense to combine hedione with ISO E super in the same perfume, which i read has similar use as diffuser?
    Oh yes - many, many fragrances contain both. So much so that I heard a presenter at last year's British Perfumer's Society symposium claim that all you needed to do to make a successful perfume was to use one third hedione, one third iso e super and one third 'something else' and it's a guaranteed success. Obviously he was overstating, but the enhancing effects of these two ingredients are complimentary and they are very widely used together.

    I have tried taking a formula for a complex perfume and making one version with hedione and one with a similar amount of iso e super instead, everything else identical: the hedione version is brighter and smoother, the iso e super version came out fuller, thicker and more textured. I used around 2% in each case and neither ingredient was obvious to smell, but the effect on the blend as a whole was very clear.
    Chris Bartlett
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    Default Re: Hedione

    Hedione should be used with caution I feel, rather than as a solvent which is the case with many modern fragrances. Eau Sauvage had about 0.5% Hedione, CK1 had over 30.0%. One of the reasons that many new launches smell the same is that, as Chris mentioned, there is a feeling that by overdosing a few reliable materials you are guaranteed a success. I think by doing this it is not success but boredom that is guaranteed.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Quote Originally Posted by David Ruskin View Post
    Hedione should be used with caution I feel, rather than as a solvent which is the case with many modern fragrances. Eau Sauvage had about 0.5% Hedione, CK1 had over 30.0%. One of the reasons that many new launches smell the same is that, as Chris mentioned, there is a feeling that by overdosing a few reliable materials you are guaranteed a success. I think by doing this it is not success but boredom that is guaranteed.
    I agree, like IES, Tonalid and Calone it has become fashionable and over used, though in the case of Hedione in huge proportions. I had not realised it was quite such a high level in CK1 I must admit - I assume you mean 30% of the concentrate though, not the finished perfume? I don't think I've ever used anything close to that either way . . . though I did rather like CK1.
    Chris Bartlett
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    Default Re: Hedione

    30.0% in the concentrate, yes. I think that's why you could smell it from half a mile away.

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    Default Re: Hedione

    Omg i read about this hedione today first time and thought this could be the thing that makes all modern perfumes smell the same,
    wanted to say i hope this is used as yeast and not as a flour:-)

    Are there any other chemicals that have this widespread use?.....

    This is like a crutch it can hide someones lack of creativity, and even more reduce the cost :-) ....my impression is that synthetics are very much miss used today .


    thank you very much Chris and David, so good info!
    Last edited by iivanita; 14th March 2013 at 08:48 PM.

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