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  1. #1

    Default Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    Forgive me if I'm using wrong terminology, and please correct me as I am obviously a newbie here. I am curious if the same notes tend to create nose fatigue in everyone or is it an individual thing? Sometimes I question whether I have just gotten used to smelling a certain fragrance or if it has faded on my skin. When reading reviews I wonder if the reviewer's skin type has caused the lack of staying power reported or could the person just have become used to the smell.

  2. #2
    Basenotes Institution 30 Roses's Avatar
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    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    Ionones do this (the smell of violets). Here is a quote and several articles about them:


    One quirk of some violets is the elusive scent of their flowers. Along with terpenes, a major component of the scent is a ketone compound called ionone that temporarily desensitises the receptors in the nose; sniff all you like, you won’t get any more smell from the flower.


    From:
    "Fragrance: The sweetness of violets"
    http://www.cosmeticsbusiness.com/sto...?storycode=409

    "Sweet and Powdery Fragrance Ingredients: Ionones"

    http://boisdejasmin.typepad.com/_/20...and_powde.html

  3. #3

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    That's really interesting about the Ionones! I never knew that!

    As far as just wearing perfumes every day, any scent can seem to disappear to your nose if you're exposed to it enough. Whenever I wear my beloved Love's True Bluish Light for more than a day in a row, I can hardly smell it at all after the first 10 minutes or so - even if I apply an amount that I know should be sufficient. The first time I wore it, I could catch whiffs of it all day, and now I have to go a couple of weeks between wearings to have that same kind of experience (something that I patently refuse to do. )

    I think that's one reason why most here rotate what they wear from day to day. When you have a signature scent that you always wear, you lose the ability to appreciate it yourself.

    For being able to tell if it's disappeared on you or if you've just developed exposure anosmia (not being able to smell it), I guess get someone else to sniff you!
    Lena
    "Curiosity is insubordination in its purest form." - Alexander Skarsgård
    Looking to try Les Senteurs Gourmandes Musc Blanc, Parfums de Nicolai Vanille Intense, Chanel Beige and...everything else!

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    When I was sampling some Serge Lutens, Ambre Sultan knocked my olfactory sense cold for a good few minutes. I couldn't even smell anything on Fumerie Turque after that. That certainly went beyond fatigue!
    Last edited by Diamondflame; 18th October 2009 at 06:41 PM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    To me, it's not about the notes but about where you spritz...

    I was told at a parfumeur store in Antwerp that one should spritz their back and shoulders to avoid fatigue. In this way (and to me, it was completely true) you get a whimpse of scent while you're moving but not "all the time"... And others too...

    Doesn't hurt to try...

  6. #6

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    It's a function of intensity and duration of (any) note that as it reaches your nostrils, no matter where the perfume was applied.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post
    It's a function of intensity and duration of (any) note that as it reaches your nostrils, no matter where the perfume was applied.

    I agree... But I also believe that if you apply your perfume in parts of your body (ie. back for instance), you're less likely to get those notes constantly, meaning less fatigue... Makes sense, no?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    Amber xD
    AUSSIES, come join our SPLIT GROUP at http://groups.google.com.au/group/oz-scent-splits

    "No Pain, No Gain"

  9. #9

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    In my earlier sampling, I began with A*Men. Big mistake. I couldn't smell other scents properly.

  10. #10
    Dependent pluran's Avatar
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    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    White florals

    _
    Last edited by pluran; 20th October 2009 at 11:55 AM.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    I don't get fatigue if I apply to a location that's far enough away from my nose. Your nose gets a chance to recover, so when the scent wafts up, you notice it. As an added benefit, you often notice more details about the scent when your nose gets a short break to regroup.

    I like applying to the wrists, since you get those random wafts either way, but you can still take a pointed sniff if you want.
    "It's not what you look like when you're doing what you're doing; it's what you're doing when you're doing what you look like you're doing."

  12. #12

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    For me, the top notes must be largely avoided or else the drydown seems weak. You can blow on the area you spray to make it dry more quickly, while simultaneously trying to breathe in a little of the top notes as possible.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Which notes tend to create nose fatigue?

    Quote Originally Posted by Baldufita View Post
    I agree... But I also believe that if you apply your perfume in parts of your body (ie. back for instance), you're less likely to get those notes constantly, meaning less fatigue... Makes sense, no?
    ..Very much so - that's why wrists are excellent, as LiveJazz mentions. I personally find the hairy side best. Also, the top or back of your head is better than your neck or face if you want to avoid fatigue. For men in an office job: I find legs ideal, particularly in the summer. And leg hairs will keep the fragrance better than the skin. Try out whatever sounds reasonable to you, and you'll find the ideal ways or spots. .
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

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