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  1. #1

    Default Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I hope this comparison will be of interest and useful. These three scents often are compared, and they are very similar. Yet each has distinctive features.

    Geo. F. Trumper's Wellington (1876) . We start here since this is the oldest of the three, and arguably established the pattern -- though Penhaligons claims to have done that. Regardless, here we have a simple yet pleasing scent. It has lots of lemon, of a particular kind. To me, this always seems like slightly dusty lemon drops. There is minty rosemary and a hint of musk.

    Penhaligons Blenheim Bouquet (1902) . This is usually the point of reference for this style of scent. It is rightly called aristocratic, even aloof in character. **Pine** makes an immediate impact in the opening, and the lemon note is more clear and natural, more like lemon rind. The scent is brighter and cooler, in comparison to Wellington. The woody spice notes are a lovely addition -- these are not particularly developed in Wellington. This is a translucent scent: it is assertive yet very graceful.

    Crown Perfumery's Town & Country (1925) Hard to find since it has been discontinued, yet it holds a certain appeal. Crown had a knack to taking the essence of a scent and reproducing it at a lower cost and with greater power and tenacity. That is true here. This is the biggest, most full-bodied and powerful of the three scents. The opening emphasizes herbal lavender and other herbal notes such as clary sage rather than lemon. The scent is more aromatic than previous two; and in fact is a bit acidic/sour. Surprisingly, the lemon note develops later. T&C is not as complex and refined as BB, but it is a worthy scent.

    At the end of the day, due to its refinement and pine note, I award Blenheim Bouquet the top marks.

    I am interested in the reactions of others on these scents.
    cheers, ody
    Last edited by odysseusm; 28th October 2009 at 07:53 PM.
    odysseusm

    "The force that through the green fuse drives the flower // drives my green age..." Dylan Thomas

  2. #2

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Yes, posts like this are very helpful.

    The only one of these I own is BB, and I find it to be a pretty casual scent (funny how we all judge these things). BB seems pretty simple, and that's OK with me. The only thing I don't particularly like is that BB has very poor longevity on my skin, because of this, I apply it to fabric. This is one of the frags in my current wardrobe I will probably repurchase when I run out.

    Keep more of these posts coming, they are very instructional.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I somehow missed this the first time around!
    Thanks for this Ody.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I always think of T&C as the better Blenheim. I have not used the latter extensively and while it came across as good I've always found Crown's knock-off deeper and more complex. I actually get quite a strong citrus top from mine, very much like a lemon & herb cough drop - but great . Powerful thyme and rosemary in the heart (no parsely & sage?), it's unique stuff.
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Thank you for the review, OdyM.

    I only have experience with Blenheim Bouquet, a nice scent with pine.

    I have pondered trying some of the Trumper scents (and already have tried several Crown masculines), so these reviews are something to keep in mind.

    Would you compare the Wellington to an eau fraiche because of the citrus?

    In search of the ideal 19th century eau de Cologne, I have oft considered the Trumper EDC.
    Last edited by Primrose; 30th October 2009 at 10:24 PM.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I ordered the Trumpers sample pack from Barclay Crocker in New Hampshire, and they're all pretty refined, "barbershoppy" and old-fashioned scents, though often weak. Within lemon territory, I was really impressed with "GFT", and might suggest Skye if you like your lemon flowerier and soapier. I haven't gotten to Wellington yet...still working my way through all 13 vials. Unfortunately, the EdC isn't among their sample pack.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    Thank you for the review, OdyM.

    I only have experience with Blenheim Bouquet, a nice scent with pine.

    I have pondered trying some of the Trumper scents (and already have tried several Crown masculines), so these reviews are something to keep in mind.

    Would you compare the Wellington to an eau fraiche because of the citrus?

    In search of the ideal 19th century eau de Cologne, I have oft considered the Trumper EDC.
    The EDC is actually quite a recent release, although it would suprise me if they hadn't had one before at some point in their history. It is an excellent quality EDC with lemon, orange, bigarade, neroli, some herbs and a little musk. It needs to be used in quantity, as these eaux do, but I get good longevity from it with a good handfull . In my opinion, it is up there with the best. Buy the big plastic bottle so you can use it freely - at 500ml for £48 its pretty good value.

    The Limes Cologne is closet to a victorian splash eau fraiche or if you want 19th century cologne, the closest you will find will be Guerlain Imperiale, I believe.

    Wellington is not an Eau Fraiche but more a comlex citrus perfume with some florals woods,musk and moss. It is very very nice in my opinion. Personally I find it a lot more friendly than the somewhat harsh Town&Country. T&C is of wonderful quality and I prefer it to BB with its clear lavender but I just find it a little cold.
    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 31st October 2009 at 12:27 AM.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  8. #8

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Yeah I'll second the Extract of Limes...it's among the most realistic lime scents that I've ever smelled, and not as short-lived as I was afraid it would be.

    The Portugal is an orange peel analog, but is really weak, even by their standards.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbeard View Post
    Yeah I'll second the Extract of Limes...it's among the most realistic lime scents that I've ever smelled, and not as short-lived as I was afraid it would be.

    The Portugal is an orange peel analog, but is really weak, even by their standards.
    You have to remember with those "colognes" like limes to use a lot - it is meant to be used by the handful .

    I find the portugal EDT lasts for absolutely ages - mostly its the musk though. It does hold a bit of the incredible orange bust from the beginning in it, but nothing like the volume of the initial few minutes. That start is awesome - beautiful sweet orange, neroli, lemon, bigarade....
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  10. #10

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Please join the Trumpers group all those interested!! Its under the "groups" link at the top right of the page.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  11. #11

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post
    Thank you for the review, OdyM.

    I only have experience with Blenheim Bouquet, a nice scent with pine.

    I have pondered trying some of the Trumper scents (and already have tried several Crown masculines), so these reviews are something to keep in mind.

    Would you compare the Wellington to an eau fraiche because of the citrus?

    In search of the ideal 19th century eau de Cologne, I have oft considered the Trumper EDC.
    Hi Primrose. Nice to hear from you.
    I wouldn't compare Wellington at all to an eau fraiche. Those EFs that I've tried have struck me with their zesty, fresh citrus notes. Wellington is truly a dusty (aged) lemon-drop type of scent. It is nice, distinctive, but in my opinion not "fresh" at all.
    Do check out the Trumper line. I think they are excellent -- the pre-1950 ones.
    And I'll second the invitation to join the Trumpers group. Good discussions there.
    Last edited by odysseusm; 31st October 2009 at 01:30 AM.
    odysseusm

    "The force that through the green fuse drives the flower // drives my green age..." Dylan Thomas

  12. #12

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Hm...the Trumper's group could be useful...forgot about that. I've gotta say, one aspect that got me into this whole thing in the beginning was a mental archetype...

    A line of "gentlemanly" colognes that would all be in good taste and never obtrusive, in a variety of scent families yet still holding true to "smelling nice and well-groomed" in the traditional sense. I realized early on that Trumpers and the similar British houses in this thread would theoretically be my best chance of finding that, even if I wouldn't want _all_ of my scents to be of that sort.

    So as I go through that sample set, I'm really thinking about whether Trumpers is realizing that concept for me...I'll tentatively say yes. I may buy full bottles of my favorite "winter" and my favorite "summer", once I decide which those are, from the 3-4 shops in the US that sell them thorugh their websites.

    And if that should happen to include a light EdC-type one, I'll happily douse myself in it at least once.

    And BTW, now that I'm thinking of it, what is bigarrade technically supposed to refer to? Is it extracted from a particular part of a particular citrus?

  13. #13

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I like what you're saying, Redbeard. I love those classy British scents.
    Bigarade, according to _The Perfume Handbook_ can be (a) Bitter Orange oil from the orange peel of the Bigarade/Seville Orange Tree or (b) Neroli, oil distilled from the flowers of that same tree. I find the orange oil issue to be very complex!
    Last edited by odysseusm; 31st October 2009 at 01:45 AM.
    odysseusm

    "The force that through the green fuse drives the flower // drives my green age..." Dylan Thomas

  14. #14

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    OK thanks for the definition... that at least explains why Portugal smells like marmalade to me. (not a bad thing). It's a creamy type of orange peel scent.

    And of course it reminds me of when I posted asking about the term "Portugal" a few months ago, and got oranges for answers, before even thinking about sampling Trumper's Portugal.

    I guess thinking about it now, it's stll there and is weak, but not much weaker than it was this morning, so I guess its longevity in terms of decay rate isn't that bad.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder View Post
    The EDC is actually quite a recent release, although it would suprise me if they hadn't had one before at some point in their history. It is an excellent quality EDC with lemon, orange, bigarade, neroli, some herbs and a little musk. It needs to be used in quantity, as these eaux do, but I get good longevity from it with a good handfull . In my opinion, it is up there with the best. Buy the big plastic bottle so you can use it freely - at 500ml for £48 its pretty good value.

    The Limes Cologne is closet to a victorian splash eau fraiche or if you want 19th century cologne, the closest you will find will be Guerlain Imperiale, I believe.

    Wellington is not an Eau Fraiche but more a comlex citrus perfume with some florals woods,musk and moss. It is very very nice in my opinion. Personally I find it a lot more friendly than the somewhat harsh Town&Country. T&C is of wonderful quality and I prefer it to BB with its clear lavender but I just find it a little cold.
    Thank you, Duckfinder, for the critique and suggestions. I try to avoid things that are too light. After all, what's the point? Yes, one does usu. have to douse in order to get scent from a light scent or EDC.

    Surprisingly, I found I actually liked D.R. Harris' Mayfair EDT. A musky floral, but wait for the drydown as the initial blast seems to hit some people hard. LOL!

    Quote Originally Posted by odysseusm View Post
    Hi Primrose. Nice to hear from you.
    I wouldn't compare Wellington at all to an eau fraiche. Those EFs that I've tried have struck me with their zesty, fresh citrus notes. Wellington is truly a dusty (aged) lemon-drop type of scent. It is nice, distinctive, but in my opinion not "fresh" at all.
    Do check out the Trumper line. I think they are excellent -- the pre-1950 ones.
    And I'll second the invitation to join the Trumpers group. Good discussions there.
    Thank you, OdyM, for the reply and invite! I hear "citrus" and then get wary. I have had my eye on Curzon for some time...a chypre, if memory serves...and reminding me of Curzon Street.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by Redbeard View Post
    And BTW, now that I'm thinking of it, what is bigarrade technically supposed to refer to? Is it extracted from a particular part of a particular citrus?
    Bigarade is another name for the bitter orange tree, as to distinguish it from the sweet orange. When used on its own in perfumery the term bigarade refers to the oil from the peel of this orange which is bitter, resinous, orangy and fresh. It has more body than one might expect. I love it!

    Neroli, an extract from bitter orange tree flowers, is more fully described as "neroli bigarade" to distinguish it from the oil from sweet orange tree flowers which is usually described as "orange flower".

    Hope that helps..
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

    "Wear R de Capucci" - Hirch Duckfinder

    reviews

  17. #17

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder View Post
    Bigarade is another name for the bitter orange tree, as to distinguish it from the sweet orange. When used on its own in perfumery the term bigarade refers to the oil from the peel of this orange which is bitter, resinous, orangy and fresh. It has more body than one might expect. I love it!

    Neroli, an extract from bitter orange tree flowers, is more fully described as "neroli bigarade" to distinguish it from the oil from sweet orange tree flowers which is usually described as "orange flower".

    Hope that helps..
    That is very helpful, hirch. The key is bigarade = bitter orange. Got it.

    AND -- I've been remiss in mentioning that there is also a Crown Perfumery social group here on BN. These classic lines have their fans. Please check it out, along with the Trumpers group.
    Last edited by odysseusm; 31st October 2009 at 12:26 PM.
    odysseusm

    "The force that through the green fuse drives the flower // drives my green age..." Dylan Thomas

  18. #18

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    Well I just got to my Wellington vial today, and you're absolutely right Ody...it's a dusty, herbal lemon drop.

    Honestly, I was so head over heels for GFT as a soapier, cleaner herbal lemon that Wellington struck me in context as a redundant runner-up.

    It's different set of herbs too...the kind of lemon+herbs that would make an excellent fish or chicken seaoning. Maybe there's some kind of mint hiding in there? Unless that's just rosemary.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    And, if I may, mention that there is a group devoted to the love of Eau de Portugal(orange) themed colognes called 'The Diogenes Club'.
    Regards,
    Jani
    _________________________

    "It is easy to find something to die for. What do you have to live for?"
    The First One.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    I own and love Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country.

    To me, Town & Country is the best of the three followed by Wellington.
    Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, and sorry I could not travel both and be one traveler, long I stood and looked down one as far as I could to where it bent in the undergrowth; Then took the other, as just as fair, ...... I shall be telling this with a sigh somewhere ages and ages hence: Two roads diverged in a wood, and I -- I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. - Robert Frost

  21. #21

    Default Re: Comparison: Wellington, Blenheim Bouquet, Town & Country

    This thread is a great read!

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