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  1. #1
    ECaruthers's Avatar
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    Default Briefs we submitted

    As promised, here's a place to share the briefs we submitted. I'll start with mine

    Brief 1 - Autumn Nights
    This fragrance should support feelings of peace, anticipation and nostalgia that come while you walk at night in autumn. The notes should follow each other smoothly but should be separate, as you encounter them on your walk. The opening note should be smoke from a wood fire in a neighbor's fireplace as you pass. The note should not be overpowering but should linger for about 5 minutes. Middle notes of the season can include pumpkin, mums (herbal-flowery) and something that suggests a pleasing chill without being identifiable as mint. The dry down should move to warmth and combine lactonic, vanilla and nutmeg smells to suggest eggnog at home after the walk.

    Brief 2 - Nu Chypriote
    This fragrance is a minimal chypre - Bergamot, Oakmoss, Labdanum and Musk . It is to be made with only the finest ingredients, in proportions that give a warm, dry integrated scent with no distinct individual notes. It can be worn alone or layered with other fragrances ("Dress your Cypriot").

    Brief 3 - Coastal Song
    This fragrance captures the duality of the California coast between Big Sur and the Muir Woods. It is both peaceful and dramatic, wet and dry. It is a marine/aquatic with eucalyptus, cyprus and redwood notes. It finishes with just enough oakmoss, patchoulli and vetiver to remind us of California's heat.

    This would make suitable artwork for the bottle.


    Brief 4 - Examen de nez

    This fragrance is both beautiful and brainy. The 8- and 11-carbon straight chain aldehydes provide a fruity waxy combination that may evolve from predominantly citrus to predominantly waxy, depending of the sophistication of the nose. The perceptive nose will also find these balanced by musky notes from androstenone and galaxolide. A less adequate nose will not be offended. Of course this fragrance can only be formulated by a perfumer whose own nose is very precise.

    Respectfully submited, Dec. 2-15, 2009

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Very cool! I think all of those are pretty neat.

    Brief 1 - Autumn Nights

    This is a very attractive seasonal theme. I generally don't reach for such scents in the spring or early summer, but when winter scents come out in early autumn, I find myself among a lot of other perfumistas - drooling in anticipation, and scrambling to get an autumnal scent - exactly of this type - at the top of my list of must-wears for the coming weeks.

    Brief 2 - Nu Chypriote

    A really interesting idea - radical minimalism on a genre that generally goes the opposite way. At this point, I realize that Grant's big problem is going to be making a decision, because there are some really good choices on the table - and I'm only on revealed brief no. 2.

    Brief 3 - Coastal Song

    Personally, this sounds like the one my nose would like the best - AND the most marketable. I simply love woody aquatics. This could be easily unisex, and if they do it, and do it well, then I don't have to buy the one I've been stalling on getting. I could easily provide customer input on this in the sampling program, too.

    Brief 4 - Examen de nez

    Again - highly avant garde, but in a very Basenotian way. It's just uber-niche - very exciting ideas underneath it. I think people would regard the scent in the same way they look at Basenotes, which is.... love it or hate it, bitch or fawn - with a certain respect.

    I'll need to create better encapsulating summaries of my two submissions. They were 2-3 page PDFs weighed down with a lot of minutiae. Once I have those ready, I'll post them, too.

    Thanks for sharing these great briefs. The way that these are setting the bar at such a high level, I'm now confident that we will have magazine-worthy scents on our hands.
    * * * *

  3. #3
    ECaruthers's Avatar
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Hey Red, thanks for the good feedback. I'd encourage you to post your full briefs. I only guessed at the length mine should be. Maybe yours were exactly what the judges wanted. I think most of the fun is in our differences.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Here's my approach.. I used wandering thoughts and photos for mine.



    The mood of rural Scottish and Irish countrysides and islands. Peaty moors, glassy lochs, moody
    skies with salty ocean air, native trees.

    The rich, smoky flavor of Scotch, deep with peat and earth.

    Small stone built churches with Druid priests burning herbals incense, wisps of smoke dancing
    from chimneys, small wildflowers scattered on hills.

    Dusty stables filled with scents of hay, earth rich with minerals, and oiled leather are close.

    Worn leather saddles, weathered wooden tools, steam coming from horses, crushed grasses and
    mosses underfoot.

    Smells coming from a kitchen such as Tayberries, Tea, Vanilla, and Honey.




    Last edited by jrd4t; 3rd January 2010 at 04:21 PM.
    I'm a colognosaurus. Rawr!

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    I mentioned the idea of doing a brief to my 14 year old daughter and she fairly exploded with an idea-- she knew exactly what she wanted. I organized the sentences for her but this is her brief (which isn't very brief at all-- as I said, she was full of ideas.)

    This fragrance is aimed at mature teenagers or young adults, or anyone who feels this way.

    An icy fragrance, breathtaking. Above all else it needs to be cold.

    A fragrance redolent of pent-up energy, seeking to be released. This is not necessarily a fragrance about motion, but about wanting to move. The wearer aspires to motion and to soaring free, (though they may not be at that moment active.) "In my heart I'm out there".

    It stimulates the senses. The wearer feels totally in the moment, aware, alert, all his or her senses are engaged. They feel empowered, in balance and in harmony with nature. It could be worn by a runner in the snow or rain, a diver-- not a sports fragrance per se, but something for the solitary athlete or anyone wanting to get in tune with nature and escape, or in tune with their body and be powerful. Therefore it could be worn by someone doing something centering like yoga or something extreme like snowboarding. The wearer feels as though they are in the clouds above everyone. They have had a revelation and their eyes have been opened. They feel cleansed.

    Cool colors: blue, gray, white

    Music: haunting, suspenseful humming, like Enya when she sings "O Come, O Come Emmanuel."

    Sounds of breathing in the background, in and out, like doing yoga, like something is building. Suspenseful.

    This was inspired by the book Specials by Scott Westerfeld-- see the cover photo (note the attitude of the girl on the front cover) and the words on the cover: " "Frighteningly beautiful--Dangerously strong--Breathtakingly fast" (see this book on Amazon here:
    http://www.amazon.com/Specials-Uglie...2277879&sr=8-1

    Textures: cold, hard, sharp, very smooth
    Flavors: like the taste of snow

    Marketing: Unisex. A cool female voice speaking hypnotically. In ads there should be a female speaking; in some ads a guy is being filmed, and in other ads a girl is being filmed.

    Buzzwords: Icy, lofty, intense, wintery but not minty, almost cruel. Fresh and not dirty at all, gives a sense of coolness; clean in the sense that B&BW Sea Island Cotton is clean and fresh (but not trying to imitate that fragrance.)

    Possible name: Winterfrost

  6. #6

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    These are lovely! I'm too shy to share mine at the moment, but I so enjoyed reading these.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quote Originally Posted by jrd4t View Post
    The mood of rural Scottish and Irish countrysides and islands. Peaty moors, glassy lochs, moody
    skies with salty ocean air, native trees.

    The rich, smoky flavor of Scotch, deep with peat and earth.

    Small stone built churches with Druid priests burning herbals incense, wisps of smoke dancing
    from chimneys, small wildflowers scattered on hills.

    Dusty stables filled with scents of hay, earth rich with minerals, and oiled leather are close.

    Worn leather saddles, weathered wooden tools, steam coming from horses, crushed grasses and
    mosses underfoot.

    Smells coming from a kitchen such as Tayberries, Tea, Vanilla, and Honey.
    Well, you don't have to work hard to sell me on this one. Nor the rest of the Pure Malt boys. This would be a winner just on the samples. Pure Malt has such a strong appeal - in spite of being built on top of the highly polarizing A*Men. I would love to see a Scotch-centered fragrance done more in line with this brief - not to replace my Pure Malt, but to approach the Scotch-as-fragrance idea from a completely different angle. This has a rustic, historic feel, which I like.

    Quote Originally Posted by 30 Roses View Post
    This fragrance is aimed at mature teenagers or young adults, or anyone who feels this way.

    An icy fragrance, breathtaking. Above all else it needs to be cold.

    It stimulates the senses. The wearer feels totally in the moment, aware, alert, all his or her senses are engaged. They feel empowered, in balance and in harmony with nature. It could be worn by a runner in the snow or rain, a diver-- not a sports fragrance per se, but something for the solitary athlete or anyone wanting to get in tune with nature and escape, or in tune with their body and be powerful. Therefore it could be worn by someone doing something centering like yoga or something extreme like snowboarding. The wearer feels as though they are in the clouds above everyone. They have had a revelation and their eyes have been opened. They feel cleansed.

    Cool colors: blue, gray, white

    Music: haunting, suspenseful humming, like Enya when she sings "O Come, O Come Emmanuel."

    Sounds of breathing in the background, in and out, like doing yoga, like something is building. Suspenseful.

    This was inspired by the book Specials by Scott Westerfeld-- see the cover photo (note the attitude of the girl on the front cover) and the words on the cover: " "Frighteningly beautiful--Dangerously strong--Breathtakingly fast" (see this book on Amazon here:
    http://www.amazon.com/Specials-Uglie...2277879&sr=8-1

    Textures: cold, hard, sharp, very smooth
    Flavors: like the taste of snow

    Marketing: Unisex. A cool female voice speaking hypnotically. In ads there should be a female speaking; in some ads a guy is being filmed, and in other ads a girl is being filmed.

    Buzzwords: Icy, lofty, intense, wintery but not minty, almost cruel. Fresh and not dirty at all, gives a sense of coolness; clean in the sense that B&BW Sea Island Cotton is clean and fresh (but not trying to imitate that fragrance.)

    Possible name: Winterfrost
    Calling all Astaroths! Your dream fragrance has just arrived. I don't think I'd mind this, either. It appeals most greatly to my inner skier and snowboarder. And something to be kept in mind is that this one should have strong appeal to the youth segment - I can just feel it in her brief.

    Wintery but not minty - that's very nice. I want me some of that. I know exactly what she's saying about Sea Island Cotton. That's a useful hint, too. There's also some aromachemical in their Dancing Waters product line that is just awesome stuff.

    As for your daughter, 30 Roses - it's too bad they can't just give her the college degrees now, and skip all that expensive going to school stuff.
    * * * *

  8. #8
    Basenotes Institution
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Like Leesee- I am feeling a little shy about mine ...... but I also enjoyed reading these posted !
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/370...o-Profumo-Onda
    For sale. Carnal Flower and Vero Profumo Onda.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Oh these are GOOD, but differ somewhat in style to the way I put my own brief together! Suddenly Im feeling a bit panicked!

    They are all great ideas! jrd4t, I love the fact you were very specific.
    Would love to see more before I post my attempt :-/
    Last edited by Sorcery of Scent; 3rd January 2010 at 08:34 PM.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quote Originally Posted by Dimitri View Post
    Oh these are GOOD, but differ somewhat in style to the way I put my own brief together! Suddenly Im feeling a bit panicked!

    They are all great ideas! jrd4t, I love the fact you were very specific.
    Would love to see more before I post my attempt :-/
    Don't worry, Dimitri. Wait till you see mine (coming). They're oddly clinical and filled with Machiavellian market-speak. I tend to be passionate about things in my own life, and let logic fly to the wind, and love pour out of my wallet, but when somebody else's money is on the line, I cut the crap and get down to business. Strangely, a mix is needed here. We are PROVING the range in briefs, just as Shimon said. I think that's absolutely fascinating. I'm just waiting for somebody's hyper-creative brief that amounts to little more than a color, and somebody else's that sounds like an entire strawman marketing proposal, including numbers. Having spent some time negotiating reality down to what the marketing people would like to say to customers without telling lies, I tend to think more toward that end of the spectrum. Legal problems? Customer issues? Marketability? Likelihood of success? I'm suddenly thinking mostly about that stuff.

    Personally, I think some of these revealed briefs are already better than mine, but I think I'll put mine out anyway, just for grins. This is one of the most entertaining threads to come around in a while.
    * * * *

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Those are hard acts to follow folks! But what the heck

    I sent this in for consideration a couple of weeks ago:

    Have you ever experienced a transcendent moment, an indescribable and fleeting moment where you suddenly felt as though your body and spirit melded with the Universe? It could have been during sex, listening to music, watching a film, sipping a great wine or perhaps during something just as simple as a slow late afternoon walk in autumn. In effect, it could be said that during one of those events you completely and utterly lost yourself in the moment.

    Moments such as those can be rare but when they occur they are sublime. Who wouldn't want more of those moments in their life?

    The fragrance I have in mind should be constructed by a very capable perfumer, one who can take words and apply them in such a way as to manipulate fragrances into expressing them. It can only be made by a talent capable of creating an olfactory vehicle to help us reach transcendent moments.

    -------------------------------------------------------------------

    The opening notes of this fragrance should be arresting but not loud, intriguing yet not brash, with just enough sillage present to allow the wearer and those close to take note, but all the while introducing and weaving for the wearer a delicious promise of things to come.

    Middle notes should seamlessly continue developing the theme of bewitching and beguiling the wearer and now actively seek to include the noses of those fortunate enough to be close. More open as it develops, and with a sillage that seems to seek boundaries ever further from the wearer's skin, the fragrance should both capture and captivate nearby souls without effort.

    The basenotes should slowly descend a rich and sumptuous stairway and at last settle into a level where the radiant aura of warmth and of feelings of desires attained can be enjoyed and savored. It should include a faint reflection of the path of the fragrance itself and include gentle reminders of the transcendent moments it afforded the wearer all along the way. Longevity should be at least six hours.

    The bottle/box must be unique in design and convey a sense of the fragrance itself. And perhaps as a final name "Enchanted" .

    For the wearing experience this fragrance will offer the retail price may end up in the niche category of cost, but the price should not be outrageous
    Last edited by kbe; 3rd January 2010 at 10:28 PM.
    Currently wearing: Encre Noire by Lalique

  12. #12
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    Redneck Perfumisto's Avatar
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    This is my first brief - it was for a "Basenotes-centric" fragrance. In re-reading it now, it sounds like Billy Mays' friendly British-American rival, Anthony Sullivan, pitching the concept of BBC America. Still kind of fun, though. I was actually planning on submitting a half-dozen briefs, but got busy, and let this one cool off until New Year's Eve, when it had to go in or else. I'm torn on the prospect of potential name conflicts, which is important here, because the whole concept is centered around the name. Part of my rationale here was something that people both throughout Basenotes AND on the outside would actually wear, and could recommend to people. I'm a believer in at least one fragrance making some decent money for Basenotes, since this frag may be paying for a better directory, if you catch my drift. If we had something as easily recommendable as, say, something you might find in Sephora or Kohls? Good. No Lonestar Memories for this cowboy, but a Stetson will do quite nicely. I wanted to see at least one realistically highly marketable fragrance in the mix. Ed's aquatic and 30_Rose's_daughter's fresh scent do that as well, so I'm less concerned that such briefs are lacking.

    So here it is, brief no. 1.

    Voyage of Discovery

    This fragrance is designed to be a celebration of Basenotes itself. It seeks to achieve several important goals:

    · To symbolize Basenotes and basenotes.net
    · To symbolize the worldwide community of fragrance lovers therein
    · To do the above with important Anglophilic and historic aspects
    · To do these things in a commercially successful manner
    · To free the perfumer to achieve these ends without undue constraint

    Background

    When looking at the membership of Basenotes, one sees that the diverse membership is, in fact, unified by the common tongue of English. Although the majority of members are from countries descended from the old British Empire and colonies, it is equally clear that the membership is now worldwide – from nearly every place and culture. This fact leads us to an important truth – that the true influence of England on the world was never in the political realm, but rather in the subtle spread of its intellectual influence, which both carried knowledge to the world, and brought even more back home, enabling its further spread. This history nicely parallels the influence of Basenotes, which is quietly British, yet unites the world in knowledge and a common love of fragrance.

    Theme

    The theme of this fragrance is embodied in the working name, Voyage of Discovery. Although one might jump to the conclusion of a well-worn, purely nautical/aquatic/”Eau” theme from “Voyage”, it is the “Discovery” aspect which frees the perfumer and allows for unlimited novelty. Although there need be no overt connection, the voyages of Charles Darwin (2009 being the bicentenary anniversary of his birth), James Cook, and others, are emblematic of the exotic, worldwide set of components available to the perfumer, and thereby provides a facile way to symbolize the worldwide membership of Basenotes. Yet, despite the familiarity of the nautical theme, or perhaps even because of it, there are provided both a target market beyond Basenotes itself, and a way to introduce the simultaneous modern and traditional thematic aspects which are so beneficial in a fragrance. “Voyage” is the classic, traditional, historical side of the theme. “Discovery” is always fresh and exciting and new, even if steeped in history.

    The idea of representing the journey of the fragrance lover as a “voyage of discovery” is almost a common idea of the community. With little effort, I found the phrase used several times on Basenotes, and also in this quote on Perfume of Life:

    To me perfume is a voyage of discovery and the thrill of the hunt!” (Annegina)

    Fragrance

    There are minimal constraints on the perfumer, other than to respect the basic theme. Suggested ways of doing this are:

    · Consider components from varied sources, particularly those parts of the world encountered by the early British explorers and naturalists.
    · Feel free to use aquatic notes and cool citrus notes to support a nautical sub-theme or unisex appeal – the former being useful for broadening commercial appeal, and the latter being representative of the Basenotes community.
    · With the above in mind, avoid a purely aquatic or nautical fragrance, typical of the broad market. This is not any voyage – it should be mind-broadening, as befits a true “voyage of discovery”. Thus, the fragrance offers the possibility of something new and exciting, should the perfumer have a groundbreaking idea that fits the basic theme.
    · Avoid coming too close to earlier aquatic/exotic contrast ideas such as “Old Spice”, yet study the success of any predecessors to avoid duplication, find patterns of market success, and discover new opportunities for a breakout fragrance idea which can claim novelty
    · Avoid an overtly “synthetic” feel, which negates the historical aspects of the theme. Something leaning toward a classic citrus eau de cologne is a possibility.

    Marketing and Other

    The word “Voyage” has been used in six fragrance names in the Basenotes Directory. The word “Discovery” has been used in two. The combination of them is not found. The phrase has been used in the website wordage for Baldessarini Del Mar, but was not used in a similar context. The usage there was less intellectual, and more targeted at a luxury theme:

    “The luxurious clear blue fragrance is inspired by the idea of a voyage of discovery across azure waters – the cool freshness of relaxing on the deck of your yacht, reminiscent of exotic places.”

    I can think of no better description of what we would be trying to avoid. The word “yacht” should be kept far away from this fragrance, as it easily diminishes the traditional aspects so important for the theme.

    The closest potential for a collision of names is with the various fragrances of Nautica – four of the six fragrances using the word “Voyage” are theirs. However, the other two predate Nautica’s use of the term, and with a sufficiently unique theme, “Voyage of Discovery” is likely to be distinct and free of legal entanglements. In addition, Nautica’s Voyage is usually used by the full name Nautica Voyage.

    If the word “Voyage” is deemed too risky from a marketing standpoint, then the similar phrase “Age of Discovery” – which retains most of the proposed theme – is a useful alternative. There is no fragrance with this name.

    Potential marketing icons include globes, maps, ships, exotic flora, and assorted nautical and exploratory accoutrements. British icons can be borrowed if kept subtle, tasteful, and world-welcoming in outlook.

    It might be fun to involve our good Captain Grant and his very fetching “First Mate” in the publicity and marketing of this fragrance – at least within the community and industry - should it be one of those chosen.

    Submitted by Redneck Perfumisto on 31 December 2009.

    I'll admit that the last part sounds a bit suck-uppish, but it's actually worse. I am not above using attractive young people with cute accents to sell juice. This is, after all, the beauty industry.

    [PS - Ken - just saw your submission. Very cool. And very interesting in relation to my next one. You'll see....]
    * * * *

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Here's my second. This features an unusual component that I've scrubbed from this public copy. I may use this myself someday, if I decide to get into perfumery at some point, but I figured that might just be a pipe dream, and better to let BN have a crack at it.

    The basic idea was influenced by my exposure to Neil Morris' Red Sky, which showed me that fragrances evoking my rock-climbing experiences are possible.

    This was for my conehead and greenie friends, as well, I have to admit. Long live Coneheads!

    Brief no. 2.....

    La Forêt Enchantée (The Enchanted Forest)

    This fragrance suggests the unusual beauty of forests with rocky features such as towers and cliffs.

    Background

    The fragrance is simply designed to give the impression of forests which are well-known to rock climbers and hikers. The primary ways in which this is evoked are:

    · Typical accords used to evoke the impression of a mixed deciduous/coniferous forest
    · Additional, newer, mineral accords, used to evoke rock or stone

    This combination, if kept subtle enough not to wander into the area of room fragrances, should still be attractive to consumers who enjoy both green and woody fragrances, as well as those who enjoy modern mineralic fragrances such as Terre d’Hermès.

    In addition, it features an unusual component (redacted).

    Theme

    The theme is simple. A green forest, featuring rock towers or cliffs, in late summer or early fall.

    Fragrance

    · It is classified as a green/woody fragrance with wet, earthy and mineralic notes
    · It is based originally on the mixed deciduous/coniferous forests of Eastern Kentucky (Red River Gorge), but it could just as easily apply to the Gorges du Verdon in France.
    · It features an unusual accord in the topnotes (redacted)
    · It contains leaf-litter (earthy) notes in the heart for realism
    · It uses discretionary floral components to allow the perfumer to adjust the scent for best overall olfactory quality
    · It uses sweet components of any kind, if needed, to moderate the redacted component
    · It uses cypress, pine, and/or hardwood notes in the base, in adjustable amounts, again to optimize quality while attaining a woody character
    · It includes an important wet mineral accord typical of sandstone towers and cliffs found in such forests
    · It uses both tree moss and oakmoss, or their synthetic analogs
    · It can optionally include a subdued chypre effect between the special component and the oakmoss, which can be enhanced by labdanum or beeswax as needed

    Marketing and Other

    A search of the Basenotes Directory reveals that there are no fragrances with the name “[La] Forêt Enchantée” or “[The] Enchanted Forest”. Three fragrances have names containing “Forêt” – Fleurs de la Forêt, Forêt de Bécharré, and La Foret for Women. Two fragrances have names with Enchantée – Nuits Enchantées and Paris Roses Enchantées. Eleven fragrances have names with “Forest”, but none are even close to “Enchanted Forest”. There are no fragrances with the word “Enchanted”.

    There are numerous hotels, parks, recreation areas, and other places and businesses with the names “[The] Enchanted Forest” and “[La] Forêt Enchantée”. These terms are clearly in such common usage that neither one should present a trademark problem.

    Both the name of the scent and the suggested accords should allow considerable freedom to the perfumer and marketer. Gender could easily be unisex or feminine based solely on the name. Strongly masculine positioning in the American market might be more difficult with the English word “Enchanted”, but is not impossible, particularly if upscale, or if marketing leans heavily to an outdoor theme (“forest”) as opposed to a magical theme (“enchanted”). In French, the name should not have a problem in the English-speaking market – particularly for niche positioning,.

    Submitted by Redneck Perfumisto on 31 December 2009.
    * * * *

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    ^5 Red!! Well done, both of them. Very interesting name too: Enchanted
    These things cannot be long hidden: the Sun, the Moon, the Truth--Buddha
    Currently wearing: Encre Noire by Lalique

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    I'm just waiting for somebody's hyper-creative brief that amounts to little more than a color....
    Wow! I didn't have to wait long!

    Quote Originally Posted by kbe View Post
    Have you ever experienced a transcendent moment, an indescribable and fleeting moment where you suddenly felt as though your body and spirit melded with the Universe? It could have been during sex, listening to music, watching a film, sipping a great wine or perhaps during something just as simple as a slow late afternoon walk in autumn. In effect, it could be said that during one of those events you completely and utterly lost yourself in the moment.

    Moments such as those can be rare but when they occur they are sublime. Who wouldn't want more of those moments in their life?

    ...

    And perhaps as a final name "Enchanted" .

    ...
    You know, I have experienced such moments!

    Good choice of names, too!

    Just a bit blown away. I'm beginning to think this whole thing is a lot more collective than we ever imagined.
    * * * *

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quote Originally Posted by Redneck Perfumisto View Post
    As for your daughter, 30 Roses - it's too bad they can't just give her the college degrees now, and skip all that expensive going to school stuff.
    She's delighted that you like her brief, and says that in her mind she's in her 20s.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Scottish, icy without mint, transcendent, international, or enchanted, I'd be happy to buy any of them. If the perfumer can capture the intention. And if not, at least we can enjoy reading the briefs. I hope others will post theirs here too.

  18. #18
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    Quarry's Avatar
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    I hope to have time tomorrow or Tuesday to read through all these tempting briefs.
    Here are my four. Click to view PDFs via Google docs. Some of you old-timers may remember rumblings of these ideas.

    His Shirt

    Her Purse

    Chicago Pajamas

    Sorrisi
    Last edited by Quarry; 4th January 2010 at 12:33 PM. Reason: Mini PDFs Disappeared

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    I do like these ideas, Quarry. All of them have very appealing scents at their core - those weird scents that are just at the edge of being tangible ideas - almost like moments - where you smell something and then it passes, but you remember the moment.

    My faves are 2 (Her Purse) and 4 (Sorrisi). The appeal of Sorrisi is more obvious - it grabs my "Un Jardin en Méditerranée" cord and yanks it into the kitchen with the stone everywhere and the oven going and a bunch of stuff fresh out of the cellar with the door open. Suddenly I'm back in Italy, and OH YEAH.

    Her Purse is more interesting. Since we're all "showing our briefs", so to speak, there's no point in stopping now. Personally, I think the smell of a purse with a bit of history is quite sexy. To me, that purse smell says woman, and - well - I do have to admit. I like 'em. It's leather and scented satin and a mishmash of lipstick and makeup and powder and all these great smells that are quite civilized, but romantic in a very urban way. It's like an olfactory thread that links all those concerts and shopping trips and dances. Oh, yeah. My wife doesn't have to ask me twice to get something out of her purse.

    Now I seriously doubt I'm going to wear this fragrance, but if we're talking about a feminine leather with "lipstick" notes? That stays on track to a realistic, je ne sai quoi "purse" smell? That my wife likes and can wear? Sign me up!

    But the name. Oh boy. If it was any better in French, it would be a no-brainer. But "Son Sac à Main"? (Hope that's right - my French is horrible.) No, better to let it stand in English than that.

    Is "Her Purse" just a concept name at this point, or do you envision that going forward? Personally, I really think this one deserves a very sophisticated name.
    * * * *

  20. #20

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Fascinating approaches. Here's my shot:

    L’Avant - woody spicy neo-classical fougère
    A basenotes fragrance must be an olfactory manifesto. What other purpose could a scent have, that bears the imprint of a community deeply dedicated to the art and craft of perfume? It must - at all cost - avoid the cheap and quotidian, the mass market routine that we have so frequently identified as the bane of modern perfumery. Instead it should reach back into the tradition of perfumery’s age of classic modernism with its emphasis on quality and complexity, while embracing the genuine technological advances and aesthetic innovations of recent years. It must feel instinctively comfortable to the lay person while revealing an intellectually vivid structure to the connoisseur - a meta-perfume that speaks of history and sings of beauty.

    From these parameters derives my vision of a neo-classical masculine fougère fit for this Neo-Victorian era of ours, with its newfound LOHA love of understated luxury, true craft and subtle distinctions. It should follow Jacques Guerlain’s classic proportions – at least 80% natural, no more than 20% synthetic. It should feature, commemorating Houbigant’s Fougère Royale and the proud lineage it spawned, a lavender topnote. But this lavender should be CO2 extracted, thus embodying quality-enhancing state-of-the-art technology. It should incorporate liquorous florals in the heart, which were once the mark of male gentility and may now embody 21st century masculine sensitivity (the rose geranium of vintage Czech & Speake No. 88 or Washington Tremlett’s Black Tie, both originating from Forester in Milan, may serve as an example). Its base should blend wood, green and spice (such as Australian sandalwood, oakmoss, coumarin, vetiver, labdanum) into a sense of nouvelle tradition providing the depth of good natural oils while imparting some of the playful transparency mastered by Giacobetti or Buxton – yet it should avoid the obviousness of Iso-e-Super employed as a creative short-cut that demotes many contemporary creations.

    The machinery of modern olfactory tools should be sufficiently integrated with the classic structure, so as to form what one may call a steampunk fragrance, as it could be comfortably worn on hand-embroidered velvet wired with color-changing nanotechnology. Finally, it will subtly incorporate the unusual, a twist only of the unexpected, to signify its 21st century pedigree (e.g. a miniscule amount of Kewda flower to sweeten a sandalwood-labdanum-coumarin-oakmoss base). Thus the Victorian English Ferns, Mouchoir pour Monsieur, Caron pour un home and Dunhill of 1934, Agua Brava, Paco Rabanne and the other classics should receive their due homage, while yet another turn of innovation is folded into the structure of this new creation binding together past and present under the name of: L’Avant (“The Forward,” referencing “lavande," as well as "l’avantgarde”).
    In terms of style and market competition, two central reference points would be Knize perfumes, specifically Knize Forest, as well as Lorenzo Villoresi, e.g. Sandalo.
    My Wardrobe
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  21. #21
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Fascinating approaches. Here's my shot:

    L’Avant - woody spicy neo-classical fougère
    A basenotes fragrance must be an olfactory manifesto. What other purpose could a scent have, that bears the imprint of a community deeply dedicated to the art and craft of perfume? It must - at all cost - avoid the cheap and quotidian, the mass market routine that we have so frequently identified as the bane of modern perfumery. Instead it should reach back into the tradition of perfumery’s age of classic modernism with its emphasis on quality and complexity, while embracing the genuine technological advances and aesthetic innovations of recent years. It must feel instinctively comfortable to the lay person while revealing an intellectually vivid structure to the connoisseur - a meta-perfume that speaks of history and sings of beauty.

    From these parameters derives my vision of a neo-classical masculine fougère fit for this Neo-Victorian era of ours, with its newfound LOHA love of understated luxury, true craft and subtle distinctions. It should follow Jacques Guerlain’s classic proportions – at least 80% natural, no more than 20% synthetic. It should feature, commemorating Houbigant’s Fougère Royale and the proud lineage it spawned, a lavender topnote. But this lavender should be CO2 extracted, thus embodying quality-enhancing state-of-the-art technology. It should incorporate liquorous florals in the heart, which were once the mark of male gentility and may now embody 21st century masculine sensitivity (the rose geranium of vintage Czech & Speake No. 88 or Washington Tremlett’s Black Tie, both originating from Forester in Milan, may serve as an example). Its base should blend wood, green and spice (such as Australian sandalwood, oakmoss, coumarin, vetiver, labdanum) into a sense of nouvelle tradition providing the depth of good natural oils while imparting some of the playful transparency mastered by Giacobetti or Buxtonyet it should avoid the obviousness of Iso-e-Super employed as a creative short-cut that demotes many contemporary creations.

    The machinery of modern olfactory tools should be sufficiently integrated with the classic structure, so as to form what one may call a steampunk fragrance, as it could be comfortably worn on hand-embroidered velvet wired with color-changing nanotechnology. Finally, it will subtly incorporate the unusual, a twist only of the unexpected, to signify its 21st century pedigree (e.g. a miniscule amount of Kewda flower to sweeten a sandalwood-labdanum-coumarin-oakmoss base). Thus the Victorian English Ferns, Mouchoir pour Monsieur, Caron pour un home and Dunhill of 1934, Agua Brava, Paco Rabanne and the other classics should receive their due homage, while yet another turn of innovation is folded into the structure of this new creation binding together past and present under the name of: L’Avant (“The Forward,” referencing “lavande," as well as "l’avantgarde”).
    In terms of style and market competition, two central reference points would be Knize perfumes, specifically Knize Forest, as well as Lorenzo Villoresi, e.g. Sandalo.
    Steampunk. Exactly. I like that. I think if there was one word to describe the whole idea, other than L'Avant itself, it would be "steampunk" (I only hope it's evaluated by somebody who actually knows the word and appreciates the genre.) Steampunk is interesting because it almost describes Basenoters and their little sophisticatedly retro alternate universe - even those who would object to being called that, or being compared to it.

    Although I'm an Iso E Super lover, I agree that we have to give that up for at least one fragrance - maybe all of them. It's like the civet of woody ambers. We simply can't get everybody on board with it in the mix. Much as I love it, sacrifices have to be made for the greater good.

    I agree with most everything you're envisioning, but especially what I've made bold. Most importantly, we have to have at least one fragrance which pays NO heed to mass market considerations. Something which is of high quality and TRUE to BNers. Part of this actually IS a market consideration. Most BNers simply aren't going to buy something that doesn't at least resemble good niche or the best CLASSIC designer fragrances. I think that at least one of the 3 scents (hopefully more) needs to be comparable to the good stuff that gets respect on the boards. Who cares if they have to make it cost more than the other two? I guarantee that I would buy a full bottle of what you're describing here, irrespective of cost. Woody spicy fougère with a modern twist? Not a problem.

    I would also say that, if some of the previous briefs were selected - especially some of the more unusual ones, then it would almost be imperative that something with traditional aspects along these lines be there to balance the mix.

    Neo-classical and steampunk. Well, I don't have to wake my son up to know which brief he's going to favor. I can hardly wait to tell him. This might actually get him to add another fragrance to his 1-bottle collection of Boss Pure. Good job!
    * * * *

  22. #22

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Quarry I love your presentations - they are very interesting ideas and beautifully laid out!!

    T_G_L I love this idea of a steampunk fragrance its a phenomenal idea - its a genre I know something of having been introduced to it by none other than our very own DustB. I have always been familiar with the age, but not the title given to it.

    OK, so here is my own brief... it is less specific in terms of ingredients, but rather precise in terms of its style. I wanted the perfumers to have plenty of artistic license with this one.


    Concept :
    I would like to see gender-neutral eau de parfum that reveals a delicate balance
    between something frightfully noxious and something wildly enchanting.

    As a child, I always wondered what the poison apple from “Snow White” might have smelled and tasted like... the idea of casting a poisonous/enchanted veil over something natural and alluring always fascinated me. Something delicious played against something wildly repugnant.

    I am inspired by botany, but in a vintage, “Brothers Grimm” sense. An age where
    women administered deadly nightshade to their eyes in an effort to dilate their
    pupils... beauty and innocence vs premeditation and witchery. I love the idea of
    rummaging through an old apothecary with fragrant wooden drawers brimming with roots and spices and shelves cluttered with amber bottles holding salves and lotions that have long since expired. Paper packages tied up with string hold obscure bushels of animal and vegetal matter, selected specifically to ward off evil spirits, or be used in a spell. A time where the line between the “old ways” and the new technologies was blurred.

    Direction :
    I would like to keep the brief open to interpretation. I have set the scene, the age,
    and the overall concept, but the ingredients chosen are up to the perfumer/chemist.
    Ideally I would like to see something ‘alarming’ when first applied... the idea is to
    inspire an initial sense of shock or regret... but then compell the wearer to lift their wrist to their nose again and again because they recognise something below...
    something beguiling and intriguing that slowly emerges as the scent dries on the skin.

    Keywords:
    Belladonna, Nightshade, Vintage, Witchery, Brothers Grimm, Apothecary,
    Rudimentary, Experimental, Contradiction, Beguile, Allure, Repell


    Imagery:
    A selection of images below are able to be used as a reference as they conjure the style and feel of the perfume I have in mind.

    Last edited by Sorcery of Scent; 4th January 2010 at 09:35 AM.

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Dimitri - this is really interesting! Not only is this just an inherently interesting concept (and fitting in the current cultural fascination with vampires and such), but I may have an implementation idea for your fragrant poison apple. Gotta sleep now - been up all night and just saw your post. Details later.

    Those pictures of witches are OUTRAGEOUS!
    * * * *

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    There are so many good ideas I can't begin to pick a favorite. But here are a few thoughts.
    Whoever wins, Quarry should do the ad campaign! Unless the Italian goverment hires her first.
    I would love a neo-fougere but respectfully suggest not using the term 'steampunk.'
    Keeping the poison apple balance from top through basenotes is a technical challenge the perfumers should love. And it will really demand testing on many skin types.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    Some of these are simply excellent. I submitted three myself, but I can see I've got some very stiff competition.

    I can't imagine how the judges are going to make their selections. I guess it'll mainly come down to personal preference.

    Good luck to you all!
    Last edited by dareka; 4th January 2010 at 06:36 PM.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    WOW! You people are very creative! I didn't submit any briefs, just wanted to see what you all have conjured up. I like these ideas and hope the perfumers find your thoughts inspiring! I know I do!

  27. #27

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    These are really very, very good! I am also inspired by the ideas each of you has submitted.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    This is one of the three that I submitted.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    (Nervously) putting mine up here:

    #1 - Fragrance Brief: the memento

    Retro green floral with atypical base, feminine

    Through its olfactory pyramid, this fragrance will trace the experience of picking a small bouquet and then drying it between the pages of a book. But for its literally bookish base, it should smell as if it could have been produced decades ago. Just as with a dried bouquet, one whiff should suggest a fondly-remembered past. Rather like Stella, its contents are suggestive of times past while its audience is relatively young.

    The top notes should include lilac, not too sweet, and transparent but definite green notes, galbanum or otherwise. (Think of the lightest of the Vent Vert reformulations or of a less-chemical Jontue – the initial impression should be definitely green without masking the flowers or smelling of mold.) A freshwater accord such as is found in Bath & Body Works’ Rainkissed Leaves may be present or not – ditto hints of lily-of-the-valley.

    The green notes and any watery scent that may be present should fade when the heart notes assert themselves, turning the fragrance more straightforwardly floral. Iris would be a nice addition, although it is expensive, or a violet if it is not too powdery or sugary. Rose should be present, but only subtly, and better if it is a slightly overripe rose. The lilac should remain and grow sweeter at this point, to better transition into the sweetness of the base. Think of Chanel No. 19, Penhaligon’s Victorian Posy, or some of Crabtree & Evelyn’s offerings. If this scent were a woman, she would be soft-spoken, but she’d have excellent posture and a good vocabulary. She’d listen to Satie’s Gymnopédies in idle moments.

    Finally, the sweetness of the lilac should fade, while the iris/violet and rose remain, and blend into the sweetness of old glue and leather such as are found in old hardback books. CB I Hate Perfume’s In The Library is the ideal reference here, but of course that has no floral notes in it, and this scent has no need for the furniture polish component. An element of bitterness can reappear at this point, whether from chamomile or from variants of the green top notes.

    This scent is something that women from about 25-35 might buy for themselves, or that mothers might buy for their daughters. It’s sentimental rather than sexy, serious rather than flirtatious. Give it a palette like a Caillebotte painting – light green, muted purple, warm brown, and the neutral shade of a rainy sky seen through a dirty window.

    --------------------

    #2 - Fragrance Brief: a California girlhood

    Eccentric floral, feminine

    The lantana flower has, I think, a beautiful aroma, but I know of no lantana perfumes - possibly because it’s thought of as a nuisance plant. This fragrance would feature the scent of the lantana while ornamenting it with other notes also drawn from a childhood in California . The olfactory elements are nearly all summery, and so this may be either a summer scent or one saved for the greyest part of winter. It’s an Aimee Mann song, a picture on a Jones Soda bottle, or a sundress from Anthropologie, meant to appeal to young women of college age or so who don’t fear idiosyncrasy.

    The lantana scent is present at all stages of the perfume, at its strongest in the heart and at its (relative) weakest in the drydown. The top notes should be punched up with a dandelion accord similar to that found in Skeem’s Lilac Dandelion. This is replaced, in the heart, with the scent of the lantana plant’s own leaves. Some find this aroma disagreeable, so it must not be allowed to overpower the bloom. It should simply fill out the smell of the flower. Also present in the heart, if possible, is the scent of a hot sidewalk. As the floral sweetness finally fades, a different chocolate/vanilla sweetness (handled very lightly, as in a very weak application of Vera Wang Princess) covers some of the lost ground, and a fabric smell like that of a warm blanket or stuffed animal replaces the sidewalk. This is the scent’s literal dessert-and-tucking-in phase. And, if this is AT ALL possible, the base lastly should incorporate, faintly, the sulfurous note left in the air after a fireworks display.

    This perfume should feel personal, rather than plastic. Alternatively, it’s a diary entry as opposed to a headshot.

    ----------------

    #3 - Fragrance Brief: she loves you

    Woody gourmand, masculine

    The distinguishing quality of masculine fragrances often seems to be abrasiveness. Wood resins become acrid, ozone scrape’s ones nostrils, spices are almost sneeze-worthy, and citrus elements are as sour as can be. This is meant to be a masculine scent that is identifiable as such without giving up the smoothness that women’s fragrances take for granted. It wouldn’t be quite the thing for a board meeting or a night spent clubbing – instead, it’s suited for time with a sweetheart or the sort of flirtation meant to attract long-term interest. The scent should make the wearer’s girlfriend want to borrow his jacket and could be marketed that way. (While single men might buy it for themselves, boyfriends or husbands might have it bought for them.)

    The two primary elements in this scent are dry wood and dry cinnamon, and they should arrive simultaneously. The former is meant to be a realistic scent of wood (a bit like being near some unvarnished furniture) so sandalwood, kyara, and amber are out. Birch strikes me as a likely candidate instead. (Beech and alder might do well, but strong evergreen elements should probably be left out, since we’re not trying to recreate Polo.) The latter should specifically reference cinnamon rolls, so it must be sweetened a little so as not to smell merely like bark. A burnt sugar sweetness might be most appropriate for this purpose, but if a very small additional element of vanilla could make the scent more “comfortable”, then it might be worthwhile. Potential lesser notes that aren’t specifically sweet might include nutmeg or ginger, but the latter is not a dry scent and would have to be handled carefully. Smelling this scent should be like being in a warm room, so a brief top note reminiscent of cold air “outside” might be an interesting touch, if possible. The last note to fade should be the cinnamon, outlasting the wood and the sugar.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Briefs we submitted

    I am absolutely dazzled by all of this magnificent creativity. You are quite an amazing group my darlings. I was not too enthused about the whole idea of a BN scent, but after reading all of these i am beside myself with anticipation to see (smell) what the final result will be.
    I really bow down to all of you and your amazing ability to give life to what will become a most glorious scent, i am sure of it.
    As i still sit here in awe.
    Quand on boit l'eau, il faut penser à sa source

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