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  1. #1

    Default Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    Hi everyone,

    It's been a while...

    During my perfume making quest I'm very lucky to have built a nice perfume organ. However I found out many materials are too 'stinky' for me. I can't even blend with them anymore cos their scents make me nauseous. It's mostly small quantities (1 oz max) of aldehydes, some woody accords and stuff like indole, civet etc. All synthetics btw.

    Any advice on what to do? Right now I'm thinking about bringing them to our 'chemical waste dispenser'. But they've been so expensive...

    Ideas?

    Thank you!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    My suggestion would be to decant a small amount of each into 90% alcohol to keep for possible future use for yourself, and sell the rest of the undiluted chemicals on eBay or through Basenotes. At least don't throw them away....don't waste good perfume materials. Give them to someone who might appreciate them if you can't sell them. Good luck!

  3. #3

    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    Thank you for your reply. I'll give it a thought.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    Use real essential oils not synthetic stuff..
    Last edited by Man_from_Shalimar; 23rd January 2010 at 12:01 PM.

  5. #5
    ECaruthers's Avatar
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    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    Irina,

    First be sure you're working in a well ventilated area. Since it's winter now, where you are, this may be a problem. If necessary, set up a fan to exhaust your work area.

    Second, try wearing the disposable masks for over your nose and mouth that people use when painting. Any store that sells paints should sell them.

    Third, Be sure to wash up, throw away paper towels, etc. at the end of every work session. Some of the ingredients you mention can linger for days.

    Fourth, try keeping all the stinky ingredients in a refrigerator when you're not working with them. The seal on the refrigerator should keep them from stinking up your whole work area.

    Fifth, as Nymphea suggested, try working with these materials pre-diluted to 10% in alcohol. They may not bother you at a lower concentration.

    Sixth, if you're using alcohol as your dispersant, consider switching to oil based perfumes. Oils evaporate much more slowly and so there's less smell when you open a bottle of, say, civet, dispersed in oil.

    Good luck.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    Thank you Your words sound very sensible as I already work like this cos of my very sensitive nose. I have a special fridge only for my perfume materials. I also make oil based perfume and you are right the effect is less diffusive.

    However I really cannot stand the stink of this stuff any longer. Even if every bottle is packed and put in 3 different aluminum containers I can still smell them on the containers (labels) of my most favorite stuff. So today I've moved everything out of the house in our outdoor winter shed (wearing a mask & gloves and after a bath I can still smell them). I don't even know if I could sell it as that would mean packing it all up (and smell it again). So if anyone here plans a trip to the Netherlands, please come by and take it all away LOL

    And yes, for me this means I'm going back to the basics, mostly all natural stuff, although I still love synthetics musks and gourmand accords and those I'll keep

    Quote Originally Posted by ECaruthers View Post
    Irina,

    First be sure you're working in a well ventilated area. Since it's winter now, where you are, this may be a problem. If necessary, set up a fan to exhaust your work area.

    Second, try wearing the disposable masks for over your nose and mouth that people use when painting. Any store that sells paints should sell them.

    Third, Be sure to wash up, throw away paper towels, etc. at the end of every work session. Some of the ingredients you mention can linger for days.

    Fourth, try keeping all the stinky ingredients in a refrigerator when you're not working with them. The seal on the refrigerator should keep them from stinking up your whole work area.

    Fifth, as Nymphea suggested, try working with these materials pre-diluted to 10% in alcohol. They may not bother you at a lower concentration.

    Sixth, if you're using alcohol as your dispersant, consider switching to oil based perfumes. Oils evaporate much more slowly and so there's less smell when you open a bottle of, say, civet, dispersed in oil.

    Good luck.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Too many 'stinky' fragrance materials

    For those needed you can dillute to 1% or even less. Let your nose be the judge.

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