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  1. #1

    Default Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Financed by Andy Tauer and with perfumeshrine's Elena Vosnaki seemingly at the editorial helm joined by perfume writer and vendor Rebecca Veuillet-Gallot, this new site casts itself as a platform for articulating the desire for true craft in perfume in opposition to the purely economic rationale of the industry and for presenting/bringing together those adhering to the code of perfumism. What do you think - is this promising? Will detractors deride it as an indirect self-advertisement for Tauer perfumes? Is it the seedling for a new community along the lines of the natural perfumer's guild - only including synthetics? Its programmatic certainly would seem to echo many of the complaints of BN veterans, including myself, on the state of the art.
    Last edited by the_good_life; 19th February 2010 at 09:32 AM.
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  2. #2

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by Perfumism.com

    Perfumism, manifesto

    Perfumes have become a commodity. What used to be true objects of desire are now shelf items which barely last...a season...Modern chemistry fertilized what could be a bloom period of perfumery and produced pale saplings failing any comparison. Modern perfumery has less to do with actual scents, but is rather created around images and visions suggested by clever marketing, in which perfumes are positioned as art. The large brands are identifying the exclusive niches and producing their own products for that specific market.

    In Perfumism however, art set in that context becomes meaningless and niche as a term becomes obsolete...

    Perfumism stands for accomplished and creative perfumers, who craft genuine scents which are in themselves art to the nose. Perfumism is innovation beyond packaging and marketing, it is building on pure and traditional perfumery. Each individual fragrance is a delicately composed harmonious masterpiece.

    There is a need for perfumism. Perfumism is the art of crafting aesthetical perfumes, which live on the image that their deliciousness provokes in the mind...low volume, slow and traditional perfumery. Perfumism explains why perfumers need to be independent and how they strive to identify true innovation.

    Against all odds, the time seems right to define the kind of perfumery I and fellow perfume creators are establishing, free from artificial concepts and strategies. Perfumism is a style of its own and a demanding approach to perfumery:

    • We create true perfumes that tell true stories.
    • We use the best natural ingredients we can obtain and build on the treasures of synthetic chemistry.
    • We craft our creations with passion and share the joy of exploring scents.
    • We surprise and create bottled beauty.


    Perfumism connects. Amongst perfume lovers we share our knowledge in our pursuit to discover true perfumes. Perfumism is inviting creative perfumers and perfume lovers, joined by their passion for scents and a common vision.

    Everyone is niche. We are not. We are perfumers who care.
    I ran the Perfumism manifesto through Google Translate with the source language set to Auto-detect and the target language as English, and here's what it spit out:

    Perfumers should stop making crap! Perfumes should smell good. And, they should be distinctive enought to evoke their own mental images and associations rather than relying on marketing to create this identity.

    The world needs independent perfumers because the major houses only make crap. Therefore, we independent perfumers unite to create Perfumism.

    We're not mainstream. We're not niche. We're, like, totally different.

    We will create perfumes, yes. But more than that, we will churn out our own endless stream of flowery marketing gobbledygook to obscure meaning and create confusion. You think Creed is all marketing? Just wait 'til you see version 2 of the Perfumism Manifesto!
    Last edited by NillaGoon; 18th February 2010 at 11:22 PM.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Financed by Andy Tauer and with perfumeshrine's Elena Vosnaki seemingly at the editorial helm joined by perfume writer and vendor Rebecca Veuillet-Gallot, this new site casts itself as a platform for articulating the desire for true craft in perfume in opposition to the purely economic rationale of the industry and for presenting/bringingt ogether those adhering to the code of perfumism. What do you think - is this promising? Will detractors deride it as an indirect self-advertisement for Tauer perfumes? Is it the seedling for a new community along the lines of the natural perfumer's guild - only including synthetics? Its programmatic certainly wouls seem to echo many of the complaints of BN veterans, including myself, on the state of the art.
    Thank you, the_good_life, for sharing this. This would seem to be the most salient observation as a perfumer is launching the site--self-promotion in the guise of perfume education and connoisseurship. I would really doubt a discussion board when participants are owners of stores or perfumers themselves. You would doubt the motives for their responses. After all, who is going to venture, "I am the owner of such-and-such perfumes, but my rivals messieurs and sons have a better selection of gourmands than we do." I don't think so.

    The jury is still out, I guess, until the site has been running awhile.
    "No sweet perfume ever tortured me more than this." Desert Rose by Sting and Cheb Mami, Album 1999.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by NillaGoon View Post
    I ran the Perfumism manifesto through Google Translate with the source language set to Auto-detect and the target language as English, and here's what it spit out:

    Perfumers should stop making crap! Perfumes should smell good. And, they should be distinctive enought to evoke their own mental images and associations rather than relying on marketing to create this identity.

    The world needs independent perfumers because the major houses only make crap. Therefore, we independent perfumers unite to create Perfumism.

    We're not mainstream. We're not niche. We're, like, totally different.

    We will create perfumes, yes. But more than that, we will churn out our own endless stream of flowery marketing gobbledygook to obscure meaning and create confusion. You think Creed is all marketing? Just wait 'til you see version 2 of the Perfumism Manifesto!

    Lol - literally! This is excellent.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Seriously, what the heck is this site? Its got no head or tail ...
    -

  6. #6

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by NillaGoon View Post
    We will create perfumes, yes. But more than that, we will churn out our own endless stream of flowery marketing gobbledygook to obscure meaning and create confusion. You think Creed is all marketing? Just wait 'til you see version 2 of the Perfumism Manifesto![/INDENT][/INDENT]
    That's exactly what I hope this sight won't turn out to be. I have hopes that it might become a platform for open source perfumes (I think I just made that up, but it's a great idea), artistic preservation and honest dialogue between perfumer(s) and consumers as the steering committee behind it are pretty respectable folks. But if it doesn't . . .well, let's just hope it does. Best of luck to Andy and Ellena, make us proud.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    I know that English isn't any of the contributors' first language, so maybe it would behoove them to hire an editor to make sure whatever message they have doesn't get lost in a sea of 10 dollar words and awkward sentence structures.
    “Auntie Mame [is] a froth of whipped cream and champagne and daydreams and Nuit de Noël perfume. She's not mortal at all.”- Patrick Dennis

  8. #8

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Financed by Andy Tauer ...
    I ever thought a well served site would cost not to much more than 100$$/month. And he has readily an own site running.

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Is it the seedling for a new community along the lines of the natural perfumer's guild - only including synthetics? Its programmatic certainly would seem to echo many of the complaints of BN veterans, including myself, on the state of the art.
    The schedule reflects romanticism. Fine fragrance and functional fragrance contribute to the smelly surrounding of every day life. Everything is scented nowadays. Not very much smells of what it really is. No food without flavors which lie to us regarding nutritional value.

    Why should anybody, who is caught in this context want to smell LIKE or OF "natural" roses?! Why not, if You dare carrying a REAL rose in the buttonhole? Or linger to the park more often. The ansatz by Tauer et al has a bit of a bloodless elite in it.
    Last edited by merry.waters; 22nd February 2010 at 08:08 PM.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by merry.waters View Post
    I ever thought a well served site would cost not to much more than 100$$/month. And he has readily an own site running.
    It should honestly be quite a bit less than that, Andy's a popular perfumer but he's not at the point of needing $100 a month for hosting.

    I'm not sure what to make of it in all honesty. I'm waiting for the other shoe to drop at this point, because what's on there now is a sweet sentiment but certainly doesn't need a board of directors.
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  10. #10

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    The good news is they have a section on... MASTERPIECES! hahahaha

    For me, it is wait and see.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    I am excited about this website and fully support their endeavors.
    http://www.basenotes.net/threads/370...o-Profumo-Onda
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  12. #12

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by merry.waters View Post
    The schedule reflects romanticism. Fine fragrance and functional fragrance contribute to the smelly surrounding of every day life. Everything is scented nowadays. Not very much smells of what it really is. No food without flavors which lie to us regarding nutritional value.

    Why should anybody, who is caught in this context want to smell LIKE or OF "natural" roses?! Why not, if You dare carrying a REAL rose in the buttonhole? Or linger to the park more often. The ansatz by Tauer et al has a bit of a bloodless elite in it.
    On this I would beg to differ from my experience as a member of Slow Food. It may have seemed like a romantic idea at the beginning to challenge the suposed hegemony of McDonalds, but at heart there is the fundamental question of what we want our culture to be, where we set the priorities. It's not about elitists cherishing foie gras, it's about consciousness, eating/thinking local, discoverng the simple pleasure of an old potato varietal - and bringing together small producers from across the world to gather and exchange agricultural wisdom and devlop strategies against agrobusiness. And it's also about making all this viable in the market, otherwise it would indeed be romanticism. Obviously perfume is a more trivial affair by comparison, but the ethos perfumism is informed by is similar to Slow Food's. I see some conceptual difficulties, or need for clarification, in the perfumism approach as well, but you have to start somewhere. Let's see what happens.

    btw: It's not about natural vs. synthetic (that's where the SF analogy fails). It's about the need to formulate a distinct arts and crafts ethos in opposition to a completely economized perfume industry which minimizes creativity and maximizes profit and does little else, as well as to the pseudo-exclusivity of "niche," which has degenerated into a mere marketing ploy.
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  13. #13

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    It's about the need to formulate a distinct arts and crafts ethos in opposition to a completely economized perfume industry which minimizes creativity and maximizes profit and does little else, as well as to the pseudo-exclusivity of "niche," which has degenerated into a mere marketing ploy.
    I understand the parallel to slow food perfectly. Alas, by definition parallels never touch ;-) Food is a vital need. Fragrance, even functional fragrance is luxury. Food has a value that can be described objectively, fragrance is subjective.

    Bad food tastes and smells LIKE something that signals a value that it doesn't have. For instance one of the infamous Chinese instant soups. Sold as chicken/beef/crab/vegetable, but never saw any of the ingredients by which they are labeled.

    With fragrance it is part of the concept to smell OF something that it isn't. Most of the contemporary fragrances go further and render abstract scents that have never been smelled before - thus "notes" are an odd idea by the way.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by merry.waters View Post
    [..] Bad food tastes and smells LIKE something that signals a value that it doesn't have. For instance one of the infamous Chinese instant soups. Sold as chicken/beef/crab/vegetable, but never saw any of the ingredients by which they are labeled.

    With fragrance it is part of the concept to smell OF something that it isn't. Most of the contemporary fragrances go further and render abstract scents that have never been smelled before - thus "notes" are an odd idea by the way.
    Absolutely correct. The analogue though is not natural vs. simulation of natural but rather that Tauer argues industrial/mass market fragrance falsely claim craft, artisanry, creativity, quality and passion, when really being based on the opposite (i.e. mass production, redundance, cheapness and economic rationality).

    Quote Tauer:
    "I got angry a while ago because I realized that some want to make us believe that their (mass market and top notch marketing) products are exactly this: dreams and artistry.


    And I have realized that so many dance happily their folklore dance and clap their hands like in a Bavarian beer tent, not realizing that the tent is all plastic and the music is from a CD player and the band is just pretending to play. Thus, I wanted to make a statement. Stop it right here and there!"
    http://www.perfumism.com/blog.6.html

    This rationale underlies mass consumer culture as a whole. Thus food is sold with nostalgic rural-agrarian images to systematically obscure the brutal reification of "industrialized" animals and mercilessly exploited soil, the entire perverse structure of big agrobusiness and hi-chem food processing. It seems only logicial that low volume organic producers expose these practices and juxtapose them to their genuine concern for quality and craft and that's what Tauer wants to do for perfume - though an inevitable risk of this is a kind of tit-for-tat among competing groups accusing each other of inauthenticity, hypocrisy. L'Oreál may come out and claim that their accountants are also driven by genuine passion when budgeting a new scent at € 0.15 per 100ml .
    Last edited by the_good_life; 23rd February 2010 at 09:23 AM.
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  15. #15

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    ... genuine concern for quality and craft and that's what Tauer wants to do for perfume - though an inevitable risk of this is a kind of tit-for-tat among competing groups accusing each other of inauthenticity, hypocrisy. L'Oreál may come out and claim that their accountants are also driven by genuine passion when budgeting a new scent at € 0.15 per 100ml .
    Still the said sad scent will have "notes" of all precious ingredients the customer expects in a fragrance. I don't argue against the attitude of being a honest craftsman. I think the problem is not a painstaking mediocre fine fragrance branch, but to much of functional fragrance. It's not low quality but the sheer mass irregardless of it's quality. Does it help to redefine perfume as a luxury good that only few can afford? I don't think Tauer addresses the real big problem.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    I think this is a rare example of people having an honest, positive agenda. I support it entirely. There is no positive change without a little romantic idealism as a focus. The strength of conviction required to hold up an idealistic agenda against the unstoppable onslaught is frighteningly rare these days...
    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 23rd February 2010 at 11:53 AM.
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  17. #17

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Well, I don't think Andy Tauer wants to solve the world's olfactory problems. But it's already a success if you can create a network of like-minded people, producers and customers, that will help to sustain an artisanal perfume culture and create at least incrementally greater consumer awareness. That's the only way some people may realize the banality of ubiquitous functional perfumery (and the fact that industrial fine perfumery has become nearly identical to it) and to begin boycotting it. To revisit the analogy, Slow Food does not want to destroy fast food, it wants to present viable alternatives, and rather than worshipping, say, the La Ratte potato, aims at establishing structures that will enable farmers to actually make a living off of growing and selling them.
    Last edited by the_good_life; 23rd February 2010 at 01:24 PM.
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    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Well, I don't think Andy Tauer wants to solve the world's olfactory problems. ... create at least incrementally greater consumer awareness.
    The network will probably remain an elitist club, that is the way I see it. Fine fragrance is per definitionem a luxury good, and Tauer aims to make even finer fragrances. I would like to see more fun and satire like the Etat Libre D'Orange line but without the iso e super ... .
    Last edited by merry.waters; 23rd February 2010 at 01:41 PM.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by merry.waters View Post
    The network will probably remain an elitist club, that is the way I see it. Fine fragrance is per definitionem a luxury good, and Tauer aims to make even finer fragrances. I would like to see more fun and satire like the Etat Libre D'Orange line but without the iso e super ... .
    Perhaps, but this kind of elitism is good, IMO. It offers, rather than dictating, visions, it's rebellious, and in no way does it exclude ironic alternatives such as ELDO
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  20. #20

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    Well, I don't think Andy Tauer wants to solve the world's olfactory problems. But it's already a success if you can create a network of like-minded people, producers and customers, that will help to sustain an artisanal perfume culture and create at least incrementally greater consumer awareness. That's the only way some people may realize the banality of ubiquitous functional perfumery (and the fact that industrial fine perfumery has become nearly identical to it) and to begin boycotting it. To revisit the analogy, Slow Food does not want to destroy fast food, it wants to present viable alternatives, and rather than worshipping, say, the La Ratte potato, aims at establishing structures that will enable farmers to actually make a living off of growing and selling them.
    I think he would love to solve the worlds olfactory problems, as many right-thinking people (i.e. those not making an enourmous profit from rubbish) would. However, he is clearly grounded in the real world to the extent that he knows this is unlikely to happen. At the same time, he simply wishes to express his strongly held beliefs that the true craft of perfumery has some human meaning and is not just an economy-of-scale number crunching excersize. It is a bold move to express belief that what you are doing yourself is superior, you lay youself open to easy (facile?) accusations of self promotion, elitism etc. To my mind, it is an objective truth that Tauer's "hand made from good ingredients with care and attention products" are better than mass market cheapies. Despite the fact that I only really like two of his perfumes (and I like those VERY much), I highly respect the craft in the others. There is work and human attention in those, steered by motives of personal artisanal satisfaction, not cynical marketing.

    He has taken a huge step of starting something - without beginnings there are no middles or ends (whatever form these may take). All credit to him.
    Last edited by hirch_duckfinder; 23rd February 2010 at 03:47 PM.
    "Don’t try to be original. Be simple. Be good technically, and if there is something in you, it will come out. ” - Henri Matisse.

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  21. #21

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by hirch_duckfinder View Post
    It is a bold move to express belief that what you are doing yourself is superior, you lay youself open to easy (facile?) accusations of self promotion, elitism etc. ... All credit to him.
    The latter is ok with me. I simply see no chance that his attempt will make it out of the inner circle of the well knowing and righteous thinking people - as far as "perfumery is an artform". Humanity suffers from other issues too. Perfumery will not cure that all.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    The ART of perfumery, or olfactory pleasure, is as much the responsibility of the receiver as it is the giver. The idea that you can appreciate a scent, not solely because it’s something you love, but because of the complex abstract messages that your brain is perceiving by smelling many varied scents, gives the value to it, as a knowledge that we have lost over the millennia of evolving. Animals and insects are certainly far more intelligent in this sense than we are.

    For far too long we have become passive receivers of what social mores and industry deems appropriate for us to understand as ‘acceptably smellable’. It has completely dwarfed our olfactory knowledge and understanding. It would be wonderful to begin reeducating ourselves to appreciate many bombastic scent combinations, (not just ‘lovely’ (aka: sweet) aromas). There is nuance and beauty to be smelled in so many infinite combinations, and yet, our young people are brainwashed into thinking only a handful of scents are acceptable. It is tragic; so this kind of pursuit is certainly worthy in my book!

  23. #23

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?


    If Communism is the philosophy of Communists, what exactly is this newly created non-word of Tauer’s? And further – is he the first self proclaimed perfumist now, or would that include his bloggers and (ghost-) writers, board members, or what else there may be?

    Everyone is niche. We are not. We are perfumers who care. - Suddenly declaring war at niche? That indeed surprises me! Gospels usually begin with a distorted picture of realities, I know. But what good can a manifesto (Italian?) do here?

    Andreas Tauer, let your perfumes speak to us and trust our noses, please! Many will like what they perceive, others won’t. In either case your manifesto would hardly change that. And, as much as it It will suit artists to write poems and (fragrant) Lieder, pamphlets will not! End of comment. NillaGoons amusing post is a much better way of dealing with this kind of nonsense appropriately.


    Still, I wonder what could have inspired this strange new blog? Tauer, besides deriving a secure income from working with some public entity has been running a kitchen lab for the development of rather exceptional perfumes in the fifth or sixth year now. I am less familiar with his followership in Switzerland, but he has certainly been able to win a growing community of customers within the global blogosphere. His talent to communicate with the right groups of people seems to have been a vital part of that.

    At the end of last year he has transformed his private business into a small limited liability company (GMbH), and it is quite possible that he wants to modify the ways to communicate also. While he has been building and expanding relationships with natural (indie) perfumers (cosmetics producers, and local traders) in the past, he may see his professional future as one of an ‘independent perfumer’ who doesn’t want to be limited by a specific credo other than ‘quality’, regardless of source.


    Nevertheless, he remains to be a small niche perfume manufacturer during years to come, and he may have to rely on internet trade and channels of distribution within the world of ‘bloggers’. Only the direction of it may change: away from the community of natural perfumery (and their customers) towards the full palette of natural and synthetic components, their suppliers and other perfumers working in a similar way. From all I hear, sales via professional distributors are on the rise, too. Therefore, seeking new Seilschaften [climbing rope(d) parties] would make sense.

    Last edited by narcus; 26th February 2010 at 05:44 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by narcus View Post


    Everyone is niche. We are not. We are perfumers who care. - Suddenly declaring war at niche? That indeed surprises me! Gospels usually begin with a distorted picture of realities, I know. But what good can a manifesto (Italian?) do here?


    I think Tauer's is a response to the corruption of "niche" as no longer a meaningful category denoting quality-driven low volume perfumery, but just a marketing ploy for selling the same "08/15" Givaudan etc. cocktail at premium prices. To remian in manifesto language, the problem is false perfume consciousness and, driven by anger as he himself says, the idea is to get a discourse going that will clarify categories and demistify the perfume business. It's not about convincing consumers by virtue of his work, which he's doing anyway but getting people to choose the red pill when looking at perfume. It's OK to like dunhill London (well, actually no), but view it as what it is: an extension of functional perfumery that smells good to some people - a product created by accountants, marketing teams and technicians, not by an inspired perfumer articulating a vision. Perfumism may turn out to be a still birth but then again it may flower into a node of communication for like-minded perfumers and information for interested consumers. I'm skeptical, but willing to give the idea a chance. The message is certainly one I can subscribe too.
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  25. #25

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    I don't disagree with the intention of having a site to discuss the artistry of perfume. My disagreement comes with a section labelled "Masterpiece". This is no different than the "Is FragranceX a Masterpiece?" threads we roll our eyes at. Those usually come from excited newbies. What is disappointing here is the idea that this committee of PERFUMism has set themselves up as the judges for what is a "masterpiece". Time and context are what sets something apart as a true masterpiece and the unwillingness to let those twin processes play out over years makes any contemporary discussion of the term meaningless and arrogant.
    While there is much to admire about the site the underlying anger that created it has tainted it a bit in my eyes. I think their hearts are in the right place I'd like to see their emotions match that.

  26. #26

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by Somerville Metro Man View Post
    I don't disagree with the intention of having a site to discuss the artistry of perfume. My disagreement comes with a section labelled "Masterpiece". This is no different than the "Is FragranceX a Masterpiece?" threads we roll our eyes at. Those usually come from excited newbies. What is disappointing here is the idea that this committee of PERFUMism has set themselves up as the judges for what is a "masterpiece". Time and context are what sets something apart as a true masterpiece and the unwillingness to let those twin processes play out over years makes any contemporary discussion of the term meaningless and arrogant.
    While there is much to admire about the site the underlying anger that created it has tainted it a bit in my eyes. I think their hearts are in the right place I'd like to see their emotions match that.
    Well, apart from the fact that newbies seldom approach the issue referencing Kant and aesthetic theory, the ultimate definition at the essay's end is tentative and explicitly considers the question of context and time:

    "So, in perfumes we might ask ourselves using objective criteria:
    How well does the fragrance converse what it has to say? (And does it have something to say in the first place?) How well does it integrate into its genre and into its time-frame? How well does it balance the facets and create its message? How well does it stay on skin? Is the perfumer or art director in possession of a distinct style uniquely his/her own? Does the perfume open a new dialogue with those who precede it and those who are following it? And finally, does it lack the pretence to pose as beauty but can it at the same time create passionate discourse? These factors might pave the path to a masterpiece."
    http://www.perfumism.com/masterpieces.5.html

    Also, I prefer to see this as a proposition for discussion, not an attempt at authoritatively pronouncing criteria. We all know the web is discursive.

    It's quite clear though, judging from the handful of responses here, that perfumism is bound to fail, since even many perfume enthusiasts of the basenotes variety, who may agree with some of its criticisms, are perceiving it as a word-mongering excercise in self-righteousness and commerically-driven networking. That was an inevitable epistemological risk of such an endeavor launched by someone commercially involved in the industry. Ironically the negative response to perfumism would seem a product of the cynism created precisely by the structures in the perfume business perfumism has attacked.
    Last edited by the_good_life; 25th February 2010 at 02:56 PM.
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    I think Tauer's is a response to the corruption of "niche" as no longer a meaningful category denoting quality-driven low volume perfumery, but just a marketing ploy for selling the same "08/15" Givaudan etc. cocktail at premium prices....
    I interpreted that part roughly the same way, and I called it a distorted picture of realities. There never was a 'corruption of niche' , except in the minds of a large number of rather uninformed, assumedly young bloggers in the 'English' writing hemisphere. I would have expected that Tauer was better informed. I know he could have been.

    <<Everyone is niche. We are not. We are perfumers who care.>>

    The way it's been emphasized, above slogan isn't a mere detail in the pamphlet. I don't see this as "a proposition for discussion" but as a call for battle. Replace 'everyone' with a brand of your choice and you will sometimes get good, other times rather bad answers. Example Serge Lutens (with or without Sheldrake):

    "Serge Lutens is niche", could be correct or false depending on details of the (economic) criteria used. Let's leave the answer open. On to the next: "We are not." Against all odds, lets just assume Tauer was correct in this. On to the final part of the slogan: "We are perfumers who care." I think, he does have the image of a perfumer who cares. Let' be generous: statement correct. So, what is so disturbing?

    The hidden venom is in the juxtaposition of everyone and we , as if there was a contrast. Logical conclusion: Lutens-Sheldrake are (niche) perfumers who do not care ?? - Just grotesque. This can't be "perfumism". I am rather reminded of the hubris of a classical hero. You could also call it unabashed narcissism, tolerable only with men in their early prime.
    Last edited by narcus; 26th February 2010 at 07:12 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  28. #28

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by the_good_life View Post
    I think Tauer's is a response to the corruption of "niche" as no longer a meaningful category denoting quality-driven low volume perfumery, but just a marketing ploy for selling the same "08/15" Givaudan etc. cocktail at premium prices. To remian in manifesto language, the problem is false perfume consciousness and, driven by anger as he himself says, the idea is to get a discourse going that will clarify categories and demystify the perfume business.
    Niche is (among other things) a clearly defined term in the world of economics, and that's how it has also been used in perfumery, probably since the sixties until, some time in the nineties, masses of younger people conquered the internet, created blogs, and linked each other to discuss their hobbies among themselves. Large enthusiasm, small knowledge.

    Perfume niche, so I hear, had a rather negative connotation before some little known manufacturers really surprised the public with products which were highly competitive with the best established brands, or beat them in almost every respect. And that's how the idea spread among consumers: niche=quality. This was not caused by marketer anonymous or abuse of any kind. From all I could observe in the past seven years it emanated from within uncensored blogs (as we all know, hosted blogs are hardly ever critical). The misconception fixed itself in the minds of each generation of newcomers. Those who tried to warn of the mistake were ignored, at least as far as could observe it.

    If we would assume the manifesto was not written to serve Tauer as a marketing submarine, then I would say Turin had already said a lot of the same within the last eight to two years ago, only clearer and in a fair manner. In nearly the same period Tauer spread his own little share of misinformation and misguidance regarding the business. The newest I am aware of: some perfume houses would label or position mediocre products as niche products in order to raise customers expectations and their willingness to pay an extra.
    Last edited by narcus; 26th February 2010 at 06:56 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  29. #29

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by Somerville Metro Man View Post
    While there is much to admire about the site the underlying anger that created it has tainted it a bit in my eyes. I think their hearts are in the right place I'd like to see their emotions match that.
    Maybe it's because perfume has no religious value to me that I cannot share any optimism for perfumism. Black pessimism only.

    Something at least I may have sorted out: Perfumistos are in charge of guarding the Manifesto, while Perfumistas are the red army of Perfumism (and the red pill Revolution is imminent!).
    Last edited by narcus; 26th February 2010 at 03:46 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    machinskii kaputtski sabotage fascitski ...
    edit Mar 04 2010: I wanted to see what's new on perfumism.com and took the Google highway getting there. Google replies: "Did you mean perfumismo. com ?"
    Oh, the slippery paths of subculuture slang - perfumismo, perfumisto, perfumism, perfumekaboom... (and I haven't even tried thinking in plurals yet) !
    Last edited by narcus; 4th March 2010 at 09:05 AM.
    'Il mondo dei profumi è un universo senza limiti: una fraganza puo rievocare sensazioni, luoghi, persone o ancora condurre in uno spazio di nuove dimensioni emozionali' L. V.

  31. #31
    Hillaire
    Guest

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Well, I am sure of one thing; the_good_life, you should be the person writing Tauer's/ "perfumisms" press; you are eloquent, and all of your proclamations/protestations on behalf of "perfumism" impute a sincere, if quixotic, righteous idealism to this "cause". And I am honestly moved to review and look beyond my initial reaction to the turgid, circuitous declaration of "perfumism's" intent (copied above), which was, to be blunt, that I was witness to another marketing shuffle.

    To illustrate my impression, I'll refer back to the parallelism to the 'slow food' movement, an admittedly privileged pastime, in which I eagerly participate .

    My heartfelt interest, as a conscientious consumer and gourmand, is in eating well (and beautifully) and in moreover acquainting myself and others with food "sources" (their political dereliction and consequently frightening product), the value of supporting private growers, and the ultimate importance, both in terms of responsibility and evolved epicurism, of consuming and cooking "slow" cuisine.

    However, I can also attest to many small restaurateurs who espouse 'slow foodism' more as a savvy 'term' than as a sincere motivation, simply in order to attract an extant, "informed" --and frankly monied -- target demographic... us bohemian bourgeoisie folks to be exact.

    Therefore, I am wary of the buzz of "consciousness", generally. And in an an effort to separate the true artisans from the bandwagon riders, I must ultimately resort to my personal discernment of quality. We all must...

    My point being, Mr. Tauer is from the get-go speaking to a specific, identified segment and obvious potential buyer. Clearly,tween girls throwing away their money for Paris Hilton's swill, won't reflect on their patronage of the bottom-line-driven cosmetic industry, nor will they stumble upon the "perfumsim" website. Nor will starving Africans. I would further argue that the presence of such a passionate declaration of "intent" adjunct to a particular fragrance maker, which trumpets a lot of already stable notions (fueled by Turin and even many of the brilliant proponents of quality here at BN) of niche fragrance's established, 'cottage'-supporting demographic (I suspect herein lies his impetus in suggesting undeserved and ubiquitous niche claims, btw -- to attract the "judicious" niche consumer.), strikes me as a particularly shrewd strategy, which will potentially expand sales. (I daresay if Jaime Oliver (for example) initiated or funded a 'slow food' website, I'd regard it no differently.)

    Finally, it is up to the true connoisseurs, who I believe are inherently capable of rising above the prevailing 'conscious'-consumer Zeigeist, to evaluate the final products of the artisan, based on their subjective notions of quality.
    I, for one -- just as I think many slow food establishments pale in contrast to classical French cuisine -- don't think Tauer's perfumes stand in the league of better Amouages or PdNs, firms I noticed his manifesto borders on declaring non-existent or somehow "false", and I therefore, with regard to all this affectation of "excellence", am just inclined to "take it all with a grain of salt".
    Last edited by Hillaire; 26th February 2010 at 08:47 PM.

  32. #32

    Default Re: Perfumism.com - what do you think?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hillaire View Post
    Well, I am sure of one thing; the_good_life, you should be the person writing Tauer's/ "perfumisms" press; you are eloquent, and all of your proclamations/protestations on behalf of "perfumism" impute a sincere, if quixotic, righteous idealism to this "cause". And I am honestly moved to review and look beyond my initial reaction to the turgid, circuitous declaration of "perfumism's" intent (copied above), which was, to be blunt, that I was witness to another marketing shuffle.

    To illustrate my impression, I'll refer back to the parallelism to the 'slow food' movement, an admittedly privileged pastime, in which I eagerly participate .

    My heartfelt interest, as a conscientious consumer and gourmand, is in eating well (and beautifully) and in moreover acquainting myself and others with food "sources" (their political dereliction and consequently frightening product), the value of supporting private growers, and the ultimate importance, both in terms of responsibility and evolved epicurism, of consuming and cooking "slow" cuisine.

    However, I can also attest to many small restaurateurs who espouse 'slow foodism' more as a savvy 'term' than as a sincere motivation, simply in order to attract an extant, "informed" --and frankly monied -- target demographic... us bohemian bourgeoisie folks to be exact.

    Therefore, I am wary of the buzz of "consciousness", generally. And in an an effort to separate the true artisans from the bandwagon riders, I must ultimately resort to my personal discernment of quality. We all must...

    My point being, Mr. Tauer is from the get-go speaking to a specific, identified segment and obvious potential buyer. Clearly,tween girls throwing away their money for Paris Hilton's swill, won't reflect on their patronage of the bottom-line-driven cosmetic industry, nor will they stumble upon the "perfumsim" website. Nor will starving Africans. I would further argue that the presence of such a passionate declaration of "intent" adjunct to a particular fragrance maker, which trumpets a lot of already stable notions (fueled by Turin and even many of the brilliant proponents of quality here at BN) of niche fragrance's established, 'cottage'-supporting demographic (I suspect herein lies his impetus in suggesting undeserved and ubiquitous niche claims, btw -- to attract the "judicious" niche consumer.), strikes me as a particularly shrewd strategy, which will potentially expand sales. (I daresay if Jaime Oliver (for example) initiated or funded a 'slow food' website, I'd regard it no differently.)

    Finally, it is up to the true connoisseur, who I believe is inherently capable of rising above the prevailing 'conscious'-consumer Zeigeist, to evaluate the final products of the artisan, based on their subjective notions of quality.
    I, for one -- just as I think many slow food establishments pale in contrast to classical French cuisine -- don't think Tauer's perfumes stand in the league of better Amouages or PdNs, firms I noticed his manifesto borders on declaring non-existent or somehow "false", and I therefore, with regard to all this affectation of "excellence", am just inclined to "take it all with a grain of salt".
    Hillaire - your points are well taken. In fact, let's have slow coffee together some time .
    I recall the debts raging within Slow Food Germany about idealism vs. interest. The issue is tricky. Most SF activists are professionals in the food business - producers, vendors, restaurateurs. Their professions and contacts enable them to be effective activists. Yet, they unquestionably have a commercial stake in the affair. I've settled for preferring an interested party lobbying on behalf of genuine extra-native olive oil and getting the job done in favor of abstract pronouncements and protests - to have at least a semblance of effective opposition to the dark powers that rule the halls of Brussels and Strasbourg. I'm deeply cynical about humanity, btw., but I often trust individuals (maybe falsely so) and it seems to me that Tauer is sincere. But perfumism needs to recalibrate its message, perhaps the initial pronouncements cam on too strong and wordily. I am looking forward to reading various perfumers' thoughts on art, though and still believe the site aims mostly at clarifying (what is artisan perfumery, how are its criteria different from mass market) rather than judging (industry - bad, artisan - good), opening a dialogue between and among like-minded perfumers and the public - which, as you correctly diagnosed, will surely consist primarily of hardcore fragheads. But, then, it's always been the crux of liberal bourgeois reformers that the people they want to reach aren't listening and the effort frequently becomes primarily about feeling good about one's own moral superiority. I do believe that SF has shown it can work and has given incredible impetus in the shape of the SF university and the Terra Madre network. Agaion, perfume is a much more limited, elitist and trivial pursuit by comparison, but I think Andy Tauer and many of us as well are deeply passionate about it. The only Tauer I wear myself is L'Air, btw. his is not my preferred style of perfumery. I prefer the older products from those myth-mongering purveyors of historical falsehoods and disingenuous infusion-method tales. Such is life . But I respect the quality of his scents and the transparency of his approach.
    My Wardrobe
    II est de forts parfums pour qui toute matière/Est poreuse. On dirait qu'ils pénètrent le verre.

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