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  1. #31
    Frag Bomb Squadron XIII
    Diamondflame's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    I work with patients in a hospital myself. Believe me, given the many unpleasant smells you encounter in the course of their stay, a close-wearing yet pleasant sillage is more than a welcome relief to many. The fact that certain medications have odors that induce mild headaches, I find it ridiculous to ban the wearing of fragrances but not deodorants in hospitals. Is body odour preferable? I don't think so. And certain deodorants actually have harsh sillage. While I understand the argument for a zero sillage in clinical settings, 'discretion' seems a far better word than 'policy'. Wear whatever you want but keep it discreet.

    Btw, Handsome Toad, what fragrance would you grab as the paramedics are about to carry you off to the waiting ambulance?

  2. #32

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    Btw, Handsome Toad, what fragrance would you grab as the paramedics are about to carry you off to the waiting ambulance?
    I told him that bottle of Rochas Man was dangerous! I'm pretty sure he'll wear his beloved Delicious Closet Queen.
    Last edited by Spray; 27th February 2010 at 01:28 PM.

  3. #33

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by paeonyrose View Post
    I can say I've never seen,heard or read of anyone having anaphylaxis to a perfume. If there are any anaesthetists, ED physicians or ICU physicians out there who've experienced this please correct me.
    I think anaphylactic shock is a bit extreme and not likely with a fragrance. When I think of anaphylaxis, I think of a GNR bacteremia, or perhaps powdered latex, or some sort of IgE mediated reexposure to some sort of anitgen. Fragrance? Nah, thats why I mentioned CNS effects (N/V/D). Hell, there is a thread here about if and what fragrance has ever made you ill, and this is in healthy people. So, sick people have a heightened sensitivity to foods and smells, at times. Since, you don't know who will react in this way, its good policy to not come to work smelling loud, but I would think something pleasant and soft would be appropriate, if nothing else to make "you" feel like you're as clean as possible in a germ ridden unit.

    To prove a point, I once put on a latex glove, touched a seemingly clean blanket on a patient's bed, then put my hand in a petri dish. About 2-3 days later, you'd be amazed what grew on it!
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  4. #34
    Frag Bomb Squadron XIII
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Scentologist View Post
    To prove a point, I once put on a latex glove, touched a seemingly clean blanket on a patient's bed, then put my hand in a petri dish. About 2-3 days later, you'd be amazed what grew on it!
    On your hand or the glove?

  5. #35

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    I work in an x-ray department and almost always wear a frag. I have had some coworkers tell me that they don't like
    pachouli. I don't believe a patient has ever given me the impression that I shouldn't be wearing cologne, and some
    have even complimented me. I mix things up pretty well, and if something strikes a nerve with someone, I try to
    avoid wearing it when they are on the work schedule that day.

  6. #36

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Oh yeah, I forgot to ask one more thing. If a coworker smells like an ashtray, is it politically correct to say, "Excuse me, you smell like an ashtray, please quit smoking, thanks."?

  7. #37
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Probably not, but if they complain on a particular fragrance you can strike a deal: you both quit or you both tolerate each other...

  8. #38

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Primrose View Post

    At other times, some scents can make others very ill to the point of vomiting. Some with migraines are affected by scent, and some pregnant women are very sensitive. I have a familly member who was made ill at the scent of jasmine when pregnant.

    You can always douse yourself when you leave the hospital and indulge to your heart's content, but hospitals are not the place to impose our will on others.
    I am going to play Eve's advocate here and reassert what I said about pregnant women, who can become ill from different scents, including some perfumes and some foods--such as the smell of fish.
    "No elegance is possible without it...perfume is a part of you." Gabrielle "Coco" Chanel
    Currently wearing: Poison by Christian Dior

  9. #39
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Basteri View Post
    My cousin asked me the same question not very long ago he is a medical Doctor and this is his first year working at the ER.

    I suggested him to check Acqua Di Parma Colonia, some of the Allegorias and Prada infusion. He bought Acqua di Parma and he told me that his co-workers want to buy it also now they have a problem because all of them will be ending smelling the same.
    Basteri,
    Too bad it's such a good choice! You sure gave good advice to your cousin. Pretty funny to think of everyone smelling of the same stuff there. Good choice.
    That girl, that bottle, that mattress and me.

  10. #40
    Dependent RHM's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    I was just in the hospital (unexpectedly) and two of my nurses smelled wonderful. It was an opportunity for me to strike up a conversation when I was alone, frightened and in pain. One wore Dolce & Gabanna, the other wore Viva La Juicy! I was so happy they were wearing scent. I felt so uncomfortable (and "stinky") from laying in an ER bed for 7 hours.

    I will always remember those two nurses and their signature scents.
    We cannot live only for ourselves. A thousand fibers connect us with our fellow men. ~Herman Melville

  11. #41
    Dependent knit at nite's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by tott View Post
    I don't see what's so ridiculous about it. A nice fragrance doesn't lift all worries from peoples shoulders, but it might make them feel more comfortable in an uncomfortable situation. It might also make hospital and its staff feel more human and approachable. (These are subtle perceptions and often subconscious.)
    Pus 1

    Of couse no one is going to say" OMG you smell great- that makes up for my relative's being in a coma, etc" That WOULD be ridic. Cello's post just said it was the perception of comfort and to both caregiver and patient, these perceptions can be subliminal.
    Last edited by knit at nite; 27th February 2010 at 10:06 PM. Reason: spelling

  12. #42

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Yuck - If I'm sick in the hospital, or being treated for something, I don't wanna smell someone's cologne or perfume. Think about it, you wouldn't walk into a patient's room playing music they might not want to listen to...

    P.S. I currently work as a unit coordinator at a hospital and I hear complaints all the time about the "cologne guy" in food services, and the skanky nurse who wears a gallon of cheap vanilla body spray.
    Sales thread here

  13. #43

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    Btw, Handsome Toad, what fragrance would you grab as the paramedics are about to carry you off to the waiting ambulance?
    I would have to grab Angel... maybe this one, perhaps.


  14. #44
    Dependent Le Grand Duc's Avatar
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    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Diamondflame View Post
    I work with patients in a hospital myself. Believe me, given the many unpleasant smells you encounter in the course of their stay, a close-wearing yet pleasant sillage is more than a welcome relief to many.
    Exactly ... that's my boy!

  15. #45

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Yep, one person's perfume can be another's poison, that's for sure. I guess it reflects people's opinion on what is acceptable. I remember back at med school we had a lecture about professionalism which included among other things advice about personal hygiene along the lines of patients not appreciating a BO ridden Dr with bad breath & dandruff leaning all over them during an examination. At one hospital I worked at there were notices from admin in the change rooms regarding acceptable personal appearance, apparently triggered by one staff member dressing inappropriately (ie major cleavage, short short skirts, mega-makeup and lots of facial piercings ). The usual advice I guess - keep things safe & average and quite, and few people will be offended.

  16. #46

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    If I worked in a Hospital I would wear something very light and conservative.....Gary

  17. #47

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Spray View Post
    I told him that bottle of Rochas Man was dangerous! I'm pretty sure he'll wear his beloved Delicious Closet Queen.
    LOL, no... I came busting out of the closet a long time ago and openly admit I'm a Lesbian trapped in a man's body. It would be Lady Vengeance by Juliette Has A Gun.


  18. #48

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Can smells be the symptoms of some conditions? I just wonder if fragrance may interfere in diagnosis. My wife told me that maskers should not be worn in an autopsy as they had to identify some smells.

  19. #49

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by zliang View Post
    Can smells be the symptoms of some conditions? I just wonder if fragrance may interfere in diagnosis. My wife told me that maskers should not be worn in an autopsy as they had to identify some smells.
    A smell could be a subjective symptom in a certain context but it is not quantifiable. If I am correct in understanding your statement and your statement, a smell would not be a symptom, it would be the insult to injury.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

  20. #50

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    I have to say that I always felt that Chanel No 5 extrait has a striking resemblance to embalming fluid. I wear it and I'm not a necrophiliac.

  21. #51

    Default Re: Hospital fragrances

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruggles View Post
    I have to say that I always felt that Chanel No 5 extrait has a striking resemblance to embalming fluid. I wear it and I'm not a necrophiliac.
    lol, I'll have to give the extrait a sniff someday. I've never smelt anything quite as disturbing as formaldehyde. Spend just a few short hours in a lab with a cadaver and it will permeate everything that came into the door with you. Truly horrible stuff.
    Is the juice worth the squeeze?

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