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  1. #1

    Default Testers/samplers longevity

    Hi,

    Maybe this is in some FAQ or a very common question:

    Is the longevity of a tester / sample going to be less than the actual bottle? I bought a couple of samples vials and sprays and sure I now know what they smell like but some of them the longevity is like poof 30 minutes. For some this wasn't the case, but just curious.

    Eitherway you guys are normally great with replies. So thanks in advance.

    NH

  2. #2

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Nope they are exactly the same! A tester is just a bottle that a company would normally set out for customers to use to try before they buy. You can normally get them for cheaper because they are labeled tester or maybe have no cap or something, but the juice inside is the same. As for samples, maybe you just get lesser longevity because you applied less? The juice should be the same either way though

  3. #3
    Craig's Avatar
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    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Samples could last less than the actual bottle does, especially if they are decanted from old stock and some official samples may even last longer than a full bottle does, it's post luck depending on how old they are.
    If a bottle has not been stored correctly away from heat and sunlight, that would also make a difference over time.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    I strongly disagree with Kinok, every cologne projects its best with a certain application. A sample vial basically just gives you and idea of the scent itself.. sillage and longevity can be hard to determine based on a sample vial, though it really all depends.

    Perfumers know it's the initial scent that attracts the buyer, that's the purpose of samples.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 22nd March 2010 at 12:30 AM.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Testers - exactly the same.
    Samples - the same 'juice' but often fragrances smell different when sprayed in comparison to when they are 'dabbed' on.
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  6. #6

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    How do you strongly disagree with me? I said the exact same thing lol. A sample is only different in that you get less in them then you get in a full spray from a bottle.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Oh I'm sorry, I thought he was asking if sample vials are the same as the real thing

    Edit - No wait, I reread, he was asking the above ^^

    You replied with "They are exactly the same"

    Sorry but testers are not the same as the originals either, testers more times than none don't have the caps on them, this exposes the juice to more oxygen and whatever particles are flowing through the air. This can ultimately change the scent of the fragrance to make it smell "lifeless"

    ^^ To add some more to this for some insight, picture leaving an onion on the counter next to a banana for a week. The banana is going to absorb some of the onions smell and end up tasting funny. -- You have 50 colognes lined up with no caps (testers) aside from whatever toxins may be in the air, the actual colognes around them are going to find a way into each others bottles. This may not happen immediately but overtime you can notice it. The end result.. you have a flatter cologne with less life because of impurities in the air and other chemicals from other fragrances seeping in and screwing with its concoction. The same reason people recommend storing your fragrances in a cool place, in the box if possible. I even know some enthusiasts who use wine coolers to store their fragrances in.

    Now.. I would not recommend ordering testers online, but sometimes you can go to Macy's and ask if they will sell you new testers. Mass marketers like Macy's have tons of brand new testers, with the caps and in the box. Usually the only difference between a new tester and a new original is that the tester will likely say "tester" some where on the bottle. And while a real bottle may be a 3.4 oz, the tester may be something very strange like a 3.0 or more common a 3.3

    If it's just a question of money, there are lots of places you can go to get quality fragrances for a fraction of the cost. Most notably - TJ MAXX, Marshall's, Ross.. They also accept returns if you didn't really use it.
    They also often have boxes open so you can take them out and get an idea of what you're going to buy, without feeling under pressure as you would in a department store.

    Better yet you can refer to sites like fragrancenet.com or fragrancex.com for reviews. More in depth reviews here on bassnotes. Though I've seen time and time again 20 positive reviews and little to no negatives, a "newbie" then goes by that.. buys the stuff and finds it repulsive, that's why it's good to follow somebody on here who likes the same stuff as you. Some people are strictly into gourmands/sweet stuff, others prefer the old powerhouses, others are all about the light crisp/fruity scents. It all depends really.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 22nd March 2010 at 06:01 AM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony87 View Post
    Testers - exactly the same.
    Samples - the same 'juice' but often fragrances smell different when sprayed in comparison to when they are 'dabbed' on.
    The gentleman states things as they are and with grace.
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  9. #9

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    The small size of a sample would, I think, make it more vulnerable to poor storage conditions. And a sample is applied differently - even a spray sample generally produces a smaller spray. So even though the juice should be identical to what's in the bottle, it may smell different.

    I'd expect testers to be closer to the real thing, since they're a larger bottle with a real sprayer. But testers can still sit around for weeks or months in light, heat, and so on. I recently encountered a perfume display where the testers were lit from beneath by lights; the bottles were mighty pretty, but they were _warm_.

    And with reformulations, the tester or sample may not be quite the same formula as the bottle that you buy.

    So when the sample was decanted into the bottle or tester, it should have been exactly the same stuff that was being decanted into bottles for sale. But that doesn't mean it's guaranteed to smell the same as the bottle that you'd buy after you sample.
    Last edited by ChickenFreak; 22nd March 2010 at 01:42 AM. Reason: Typo.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    If there were a difference between testers and normal bottles, testers would be better to make you buy the product.
    Great works are performed, not by strength, but by perseverance.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    I don't think producers would change whole production line just to put low quality juice in a few bottles. However, tester bottles are usually unboxed, which allows the bottle to be exposed to light and heat all day in the store, and usually without a cap which allows a slight bit of air to meddle with the juice.
    Last edited by leto; 22nd March 2010 at 07:54 AM.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Tester bottles are the same perfume as retail bottles. Most do not have caps, though some do. Most have some sort of marking indicating they are testers, though some do not. Almost all come with boxes, though a few do not. Almost all are the exact same physical bottle, with very few exceptions.

    Samples are a bit different. If they are manufacturer samples you can be confident they are the same as the full bottle unless they are very old and improperly stored (which goes for full bottles as well). If they are aftermarket samples such as hand made decants then there is a chance they have degraded and no longer are true to the original scent. As most decants are sprayed from the parent bottle into a supposedly clean sample vial they have been exposed to a good amount of air and are far more likely to have mixed with other chemicals. Rule of thumb to get the best possible samples is to buy manufacturer samples if at all possible, and, if buying decants, to buy them new and/or unused.

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    Sorry but testers are not the same as the originals either, testers more times than none don't have the caps on them, this exposes the juice to more oxygen and whatever particles are flowing through the air. This can ultimately change the scent of the fragrance to make it smell "lifeless"

    ^^ To add some more to this for some insight, picture leaving an onion on the counter next to a banana for a week. The banana is going to absorb some of the onions smell and end up tasting funny. -- You have 50 colognes lined up with no caps (testers) aside from whatever toxins may be in the air, the actual colognes around them are going to find a way into each others bottles. This may not happen immediately but overtime you can notice it. The end result.. you have a flatter cologne with less life because of impurities in the air and other chemicals from other fragrances seeping in and screwing with its concoction.
    What? Aromatic compounds floating in the air, entering a bottle -- capped or not, caps are hardly perfect seals -- then remixing with the perfume solution? I find this very unlikely and even if it were true we're talking minuscule amounts. Literally parts per million of largely non-reactive chemicals. Oxygen exposure is far more damaging, with heat and light accelerating redox in the solution, degrading the scent.

    The metaphor you provided, of the onion, is not the same. When cut onions release sulfuric compounds which react with a wide variety of foodstuffs, as well as your eyes. Perfume chemicals are stable compounds that should not react with other common substances. They aren't going to mix with each other while sitting in separate bottles.
    Last edited by DocmanCC; 22nd March 2010 at 08:58 AM.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by Anthony87 View Post
    Testers - exactly the same.
    Samples - the same 'juice' but often fragrances smell different when sprayed in comparison to when they are 'dabbed' on.
    I completely agree with Anthony87 on this. I hated GIT when I dabbed it on first (it started smelling ugly, cheap stuff). But when I was later able to spray it on my skin, it worked out to be really good. I repeated this experiment later to ensure that I was correct.

    And to answer the query, I think that the right amount needs to be applied. The sprays from samples are going to be really tiny, so that could not project as much. Try applying appropriate quantity (not more, not less). Also, the samples are of really small size and can be prone to 'ageing' early if not stored in ideal conditions (away from excessive light and fluctuating temperatures).
    Last edited by HammerFist; 22nd March 2010 at 11:32 AM.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by HammerFist View Post
    I completely agree with Anthony87 on this. I hated GIT when I dabbed it on first (it started smelling ugly, cheap stuff). But when I was later able to spray it on my skin, it worked out to be really good. I repeated this experiment later to ensure that I was correct.

    And to answer the query, I think that the right amount needs to be applied. The sprays from samples are going to be really tiny, so that could not project as much. Try applying appropriate quantity (not more, not less). Also, the samples are of really small size and can be prone to 'ageing' early if not stored in ideal conditions (away from excessive light and fluctuating temperatures).
    I also found the same with GIT... Much more depth & longevity when sprayed from a 2ml sprayer, as opposed to just dabbing on from sample vials.
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  15. #15

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Double post
    Last edited by Anthony87; 22nd March 2010 at 12:44 PM.
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  16. #16

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by DocmanCC View Post
    Tester bottles are the same perfume as retail bottles. Most do not have caps, though some do. Most have some sort of marking indicating they are testers, though some do not. Almost all come with boxes, though a few do not. Almost all are the exact same physical bottle, with very few exceptions.

    Samples are a bit different. If they are manufacturer samples you can be confident they are the same as the full bottle unless they are very old and improperly stored (which goes for full bottles as well). If they are aftermarket samples such as hand made decants then there is a chance they have degraded and no longer are true to the original scent. As most decants are sprayed from the parent bottle into a supposedly clean sample vial they have been exposed to a good amount of air and are far more likely to have mixed with other chemicals. Rule of thumb to get the best possible samples is to buy manufacturer samples if at all possible, and, if buying decants, to buy them new and/or unused.



    What? Aromatic compounds floating in the air, entering a bottle -- capped or not, caps are hardly perfect seals -- then remixing with the perfume solution? I find this very unlikely and even if it were true we're talking minuscule amounts. Literally parts per million of largely non-reactive chemicals. Oxygen exposure is far more damaging, with heat and light accelerating redox in the solution, degrading the scent.

    The metaphor you provided, of the onion, is not the same. When cut onions release sulfuric compounds which react with a wide variety of foodstuffs, as well as your eyes. Perfume chemicals are stable compounds that should not react with other common substances. They aren't going to mix with each other while sitting in separate bottles.
    I beg to differ, and I think many would as well, as I have worked at Macy's and spoke frequently to people who actually work in the labs to make perfumes, and to get the ingredients for the oils. Now I'm not saying that I know everything, but I wouldn't say something unless I could back it up. Try this for yourself take bottle of cologne or perfume, place it on the counter, exposed somewhat to sun, and place several other colognes with out caps around it. Let it sit for at least a month.. overtime I guarantee you 100000% your fragrance will turn. Not just in smell and overall performance but possibly in color as well. Or to make things less time consuming go order some testers from a place like Parfumedistributor.com, (I believe this is the name) They sell these testers at very low prices (obviously for a reason, because they have turned) Every so often at Macy's a group of people from a perfumer will come in and speak to the managers of the cosmetics/fragrance departments and talk about what's a hot commodity and what isn't. Do some surveys, ask some questions etc etc. stuff you would expect. Knowing some of these people and having access to contact them, just gives me a little more insight into what I love. If you believe that you're right than that's fine. If you believe that what I say is ridiculous, that's your opinion. I am just helping a fellow out, based on what I know, what I've known for years, and what's ultimately going to help any noob in the long run.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    LOL, I forgot something.
    "Perfume chemicals are stable compounds that should not react with other common substances. They aren't going to mix with each other while sitting in separate bottles. "

    ^^ Maybe I'm misunderstanding.. That's like saying layering fragrances won't affect an individual fragrance because the chemicals inside are "stable compounds"

    Another example.. Mixing ammonia with bleach. Obviously they have stable compounds in them, but that has nothing to do with the chemical reaction. If you've never mixed the 2, I don't recommend it.. it's gonna smoke and can be very harmful to ones health.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 23rd March 2010 at 05:45 PM.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Hi!

    Interesting discussion. I immediately thought of fragrances that are sold without a cap. Like some Gaultier frags, Bvlgari Aqva, Paco Rabanne 1 Million, Armani Diamonds, Cartier Declaration... My Aqva didn´t change, but that was a 50ml bottle that I used up quickly.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    ^^ and sadly those are more vulnerable to turning. Now if they are more synthetic like most of the Curve's with no caps, more synthetic ingredients keep the fragrance safer and less prone to going bad. Just like preservatives in food.

    Strangely enough all of the "capless" curves come equipped with a tin, as opposed to just a normal box. Coincidence? Or maybe Claiborne is a step ahead of everyone else and knows about the possible dangers of a cologne with no cap being exposed.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 23rd March 2010 at 05:49 PM.

  20. #20

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    I thought this topic was about ordering a fragrance as a tester, if the juice inside will be the same or not? Yes the juice is the same. If you buy a tester online it is not one that has been sitting around a store for ages. It is one that is brand new and is inside a box. It is true many times they don't have caps, but many fragrances don't have caps. Unless you are leaving them around for ages in a sauna, they should do ok.
    I'm not your toy.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    Try this for yourself take bottle of cologne or perfume, place it on the counter, exposed somewhat to sun, and place several other colognes with out caps around it.
    I'm confused - this sounds like proof that sun will damage the bottle, not the lack of a cap.

  22. #22

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by ChickenFreak View Post
    I'm confused - this sounds like proof that sun will damage the bottle, not the lack of a cap.
    Assuming the bottle is capless:
    Exposing it to sunlight will not only speed up its demise, but allow harmful particles in the air to seep into the bottle more efficiently. Heat creates things to expand, the sprayer will open up more (although you can't actually see it with the naked eye) tests have been done and this has been proven, so I don't understand why some you even try to argue..
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 23rd March 2010 at 05:40 PM.

  23. #23

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    But it's well established that light and heat damage perfume. So to test your theory, you have to eliminate those factors and perform the experiment in a cool dark chamber.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by ChickenFreak View Post
    But it's well established that light and heat damage perfume. So to test your theory, you have to eliminate those factors and perform the experiment in a cool dark chamber.
    The "theory" never specified that it was stored in a dark place. So rather.. to test your new theory would be irrelevant because I never made that claim -- instead please search around the net or on youtube as many connoisseurs can tell you that a fragrance keeps best with its cap, and in the box regardless of temperature. Of course it's a given that heat will just speed up its demise because as you stated it's a known fact.

    It's like saying milk keeps better without the cap.. Not nearly the same, but the same ridiculous concept, they make caps for a reason. If you actually believe that it has no affect whatsoever on fragrances, then by all means.. continue your methods.

    Adding to this: The basic idea of me saying all this was to let people know that there are differences between testers and originals.. not to "test theories" and not to argue. There's no theory to test when its already been proven, it just makes you look argumentative.
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 23rd March 2010 at 11:26 PM.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    You would probably find that due to the pressure difference in the nozzle & pipe with the atmosphere, not to mention the expulsion of the possibly contaminated liquid in the pipe, it would be pretty hard for anything in the atmosphere to physically contaminate a fragrance.

    You definitely want to keep your bottles away from UV and heat though!
    Last edited by Anthony87; 23rd March 2010 at 11:43 PM.
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  26. #26
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    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Ok, this is getting silly. Lets try not to rely on anecdotal evidence here, ok?

    Left uncapped, I very much doubt fragrances evaporate even 1ml of liquid annually but lets say this is true. What are the chances of the fragrance molecules surviving the trip to the neighboring bottle? Air and liquid density does not change that much throughout the day so it's not as if the bottles are breathing air in and out. Even if so the quantities would be minuscule. The small negative pressure created by spraying is the primary cause of air entering a bottle, when the bottles are no longer adjacent to eachother.

    Over the lifetime of a bottle it will maybe gain a few thousand particles of other fragrances as it displaces used perfume. A few thousand out of trillions will definitely not be noticed, assuming the uninvited molecules re-liquefy to begin with, which is another set of unlikely events. Do you see why now this idea is absurd?

    My apologies to the original poster whose thread has strayed is far off topic.
    Last edited by DocmanCC; 25th March 2010 at 08:47 PM.

  27. #27

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    The simple facts are:

    Testers contain the same liquid as retail bottles. Some can be affected by heat and light (UV), which can alter the colour, or slightly alter the smell, of a fragrance.

    Sample vials can smell different to the 'full product' as dabbing a fragrance doesnt give off the top notes as much, as well as altering the dispersion of the fragrance onto your skin. Also applying directly to your skin from a sample vial can allow the contaminants on your skin, or skin cells themselves, to enter the vial (its doubtful that this affects the smell)

    The only way a fragrance without a cap (le Male, etc) will smell any different is if its a splash bottle.

    The initial posters question has been answered correctly (a few times), all these long, pseudo-science posts are doing is complicating the issue!
    Last edited by Anthony87; 25th March 2010 at 11:12 PM.
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  28. #28

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    sometimes, the testers can be vintage while you will be sold the new stuff.

    not a biggie, really

  29. #29

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    I'm curious to know if any of you have actually bought/owned a tester? Every tester I've had was significantly different from the original fragrance.. as I said many posts ago "lifeless"

    To me the sample vial is the real thing, no ifs, ands or buts. Only difference is the way it's distributed whether dabbed on or sprayed, it's usually not gonna be as affective as the original authentic bottle. Everything else on this thread is just a back and forth debate that can go on forever.

    In conclusion I'm just going to say that since perfumes really work due to containing highly volatile organic molecules, I'd imagine no matter how well you seal them up, they will eventually either decompose or make it through whatever seals you have on them. There aren't a lot of each molecule in there, so a small change would have a reasonable effect on the smell, especially to highly sensitive people (There's quite a range of sensitivity to smells amongst humans).
    Last edited by The_Cologneist; 24th March 2010 at 06:57 AM.

  30. #30

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    Quote Originally Posted by The_Cologneist View Post
    It's like saying milk keeps better without the cap.
    Wait. Are we talking about splash bottles? Yes, of course an open splash bottle would evaporate and deteriorate - it has perhaps half a square inch _open_ to the air. I thought that we were talking about spray bottles.

    Edited to add - and, yeah, I have a tester of Cristalle and a capped normal bottle of Cristalle. They're both kept in the cool and dark, and they both smell the same.
    Last edited by ChickenFreak; 25th March 2010 at 08:40 PM.

  31. #31

    Default Re: Testers/samplers longevity

    I'm curious to know if any of you have actually bought/owned a tester? Every tester I've had was significantly different from the original fragrance.. as I said many posts ago "lifeless"
    Why yes in fact I do own some testers! And they are all exactly the same as the original fragrances. One doesn't even have a cap, and it is perfectly fine. I fail to see where the logic of air tight caps is coming into play. Most bottles of fragrances I own the caps are FAR from air tight. Like stated before, unless you have a splash or massive flacon of something, chances are if you keep it out of sunlight and heat, it will be pretty much safe. If you are going to get super technical about everything, which it seems like you are, there is no doubt a fragrance is going to decay over a period of time. I don't think it is a world crises though, causing it to evaporate within a month. In fact, I feel much safer keeping my Hypnotic Poison Elixir stored with the spray pump attached then taking it out/off everytime I want to spray and replacing it with its "airtight" cap.

    Anyway those are just my thoughts on the subject. I think technicalities took this uber far off topic :X
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